Refine Search

New Search

Results: 4

(searched for: doi:10.1016/j.jbi.2021.103793)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
P.K. Jithesh
Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, Volume 211; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmpb.2021.106402

Abstract:
Background and Objective COVID-19 pandemic continues unabated due to the rapid spread of new mutant strains of the virus. Decentralized cluster containment is an efficient approach to manage the pandemic in the long term, without straining the healthcare system and economy.
Published: 25 June 2021
by MDPI
Journal of Clinical Medicine, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132813

Abstract:
The approved coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccines reduce the risk of disease by 70–95%; however, their efficacy in preventing COVID-19 is unclear. Moreover, the limited vaccine supply raises questions on how they can be used effectively. To examine the optimal allocation of COVID-19 vaccines in South Korea, we constructed an age-structured mathematical model, calibrated using country-specific demographic and epidemiological data. The optimal control problem was formulated with the aim of finding time-dependent age-specific optimal vaccination strategies to minimize costs related to COVID-19 infections and vaccination, considering a limited vaccine supply and various vaccine effects on susceptibility and symptomatology. Our results suggest that “susceptibility-reducing” vaccines should be relatively evenly distributed among all age groups, resulting in more than 40% of eligible age groups being vaccinated. In contrast, “symptom-reducing” vaccines should be administered mainly to individuals aged 20–29 and ≥60 years. Thus, our study suggests that the vaccine profile should determine the optimal vaccination strategy. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding vaccine’s effects on susceptibility and symptomatology for effective public health interventions.
, Mengyu Zhang
Published: 17 June 2021
Complexity, Volume 2021, pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1155/2021/6692678

Abstract:
As COVID-19 in some countries has increasingly become more severe, there have been significant efforts to develop models that forecast its evolution there. These models can help to control and prevent the outbreak of these infections. In this paper, we make long-term predictions based on the number of current confirmed cases, accumulative recovered cases, and dead cases of COVID-19 in some countries by the modeling approach. We use the SIRD (S: susceptible, I: infected, R: recovered, D: dead) epidemic model which is a nonautonomous dynamic system with incubation time delay to study the evolution of COVID-19 in some countries. From the analysis of the recent data, we find that the cure and death rates may not be constant and, in some countries, they are piecewise functions. They can be estimated from the delayed SIRD model by the finite difference method. According to the recent data and its subsequent cure and death rates, we can accurately estimate the parameters of the model and then predict the evolution of COVID-19 there. Through the predicted results, we can obtain the turning points, the plateau period, and the maximum number of COVID-19 cases. The predicted results suggest that the epidemic situation in some countries is very serious. It is advisable for the governments of these countries to take more stringent and scientific containment measures. Finally, we studied the impact of the infection rate β on COVID-19. We find that when the infection rate β decreases, the cumulative number of confirmed cases and the maximum number of currently infected cases will greatly decrease. The results further affirm that the containment techniques taken by these countries to curb the spread of COVID-19 should be strengthened further.
, Yan Chu, Shayan Shams, Yejin Kim, Ananth V. Annapragada, Devika Subramanian, Ioannis Kakadiaris, Assaf Gottlieb, Xiaoqian Jiang
Journal of Biomedical Informatics, Volume 119; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbi.2021.103818

Abstract:
Study the impact of local policies on near-future hospitalization and mortality rates. We introduce a novel risk-stratified SIR-HCD model that introduces new variables to model the dynamics of low-contact (e.g., work from home) and high-contact (e.g., work on-site) subpopulations while sharing parameters to control their respective R0(t) over time. We test our model on data of daily reported hospitalizations and cumulative mortality of COVID-19 in Harris County, Texas, from May 1, 2020, until October 4, 2020, collected from multiple sources (USA FACTS, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council COVID-19 report, TMC daily news, and Johns Hopkins University county-level mortality reporting). We evaluated our model’s forecasting accuracy in Harris County, TX (the most populated county in the Greater Houston area) during Phase-I and Phase-II reopening. Not only does our model outperform other competing models, but it also supports counterfactual analysis to simulate the impact of future policies in a local setting, which is unique among existing approaches. Mortality and hospitalization rates are significantly impacted by local quarantine and reopening policies. Existing models do not directly account for the effect of these policies on infection, hospitalization, and death rates in an explicit and explainable manner. Our work is an attempt to improve prediction of these trends by incorporating this information into the model, thus supporting decision-making. Our work is a timely effort to attempt to model the dynamics of pandemics under the influence of local policies.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top