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(searched for: doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146380)
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Published: 27 April 2021
by MDPI
Atmosphere, Volume 12; doi:10.3390/atmos12050562

Abstract:
Due to the exponential growth of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Spain (2020), the Spanish Government adopted lockdown measures as mitigating strategies to reduce the spread of the pandemic from 14 March. In this paper, we report the results of the change in air quality at two Atlantic Coastal European cities (Northwest Spain) during five lockdown weeks. The temporal evolution of gaseous (nitrogen oxides, comprising NOx, NO, and NO2; sulfur dioxide, SO2; carbon monoxide, CO; and ozone, O3) and particulate matter (PM10; PM2.5; and equivalent black carbon, eBC) pollutants were recorded before (7 February to 13 March 2020) and during the first five lockdown weeks (14 March to 20 April 2020) at seven air quality monitoring stations (urban background, traffic, and industrial) in the cities of A Coruña and Vigo. The influences of the backward trajectories and meteorological parameters on air pollutant concentrations were considered during the studied period. The temporal trends indicate that the concentrations of almost all species steadily decreased during the lockdown period with statistical significance, with respect to the pre-lockdown period. In this context, great reductions were observed for pollutants related mainly to fossil fuel combustion, road traffic, and shipping emissions (−38 to −78% for NO, −22 to −69% for NO2, −26 to −75% for NOx, −3 to −77% for SO2, −21% for CO, −25 to −49% for PM10, −10 to −38% for PM2.5, and −29 to −51% for eBC). Conversely, O3 concentrations increased from +5 to +16%. Finally, pollutant concentration data for 14 March to 20 April of 2020 were compared with those of the previous two years. The results show that the overall air pollutants levels were higher during 2018–2019 than during the lockdown period.
, Constanza Avendaño-Vera, Alex Boso, ,
Published: 7 April 2021
Abstract:
Introduction In south-central Chile, outdoor air pollution primarily originates as household air pollution from wood burning for heating. The effect of COVID-19 lockdowns on ambient air pollution levels in urban south-central Chile may therefore be different from trends observed in cities where transportation and industrial emission sources dominate. Methods This quasi-experimental study compares hourly fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10) particulate matter measurements from six air monitoring stations (three reference grade beta attenuation monitors and three low-cost SPS30 sensors) in commercial and low or middle-income residential areas of Temuco and Padre Las Casas, Chile between March-September 2019 and 2020 (spanning COVID-19 lockdown). Results In Padre Las Casas, average outdoor PM2.5 concentrations peaked above 100 ug/m3 from 8-10 pm during winter (May-August) 2019 and 2020, when wood burning is common. During COVID-19 lockdown, average monthly ambient PM2.5 concentrations in a commercial and middle-income residential area of Temuco were up to 50% higher (12 µg/m3 to 18 µg/m3) and 59% higher (22 µg/m3 to 35 µg/m3) than 2019 levels, respectively. Conversely, PM2.5 levels decreased by up to 52% (43 µg/m3 to 21 µg/m3) in low-income neighborhoods. The night-time (8 pm-9 am) mass percent of PM10 that was PM2.5 during strict quarantine (April 2020) increased by 48% above April 2017-2019 proportions (50% to 74%) in a commercial area of Temuco. Conclusions Wood burning for home heating was responsible for a significantly higher proportion of ambient PM2.5 pollution in commercial areas and middle-income neighborhoods of Temuco during COVID-19 lockdown, compared to winter months in 2019. Constrastingly, energy insecure households likely refrained from wood heating during lockdown, leading to PM2.5 concentration declines. To reduce the double burden of ambient air pollution and energy insecurity in south-central Chile, affordability of clean heating fuels (e.g. electricity, liquefied petroleum gas) should be a policy priority.
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