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(searched for: doi:10.1080/14697017.2021.1861724)
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, Arménio Rego, Marco Berti, Stewart Clegg, Miguel Pina e Cunha
Published: 18 December 2021
Abstract:
During times of suffering such as that inflicted by the COVID-19 pandemic, compassion expressed by leaders helps to ease distress. Doing so, those in a position to provide resources that might facilitate coping and recovery are attentive to the situations of distress. Despite an abundance of leadership theorizing and models, there still is little academic literature on compassionate leadership. To address this limitation, we present an exploratory case study of New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, someone widely recognized for her compassionate leadership and frequently described in paradoxical terms (e.g. ‘kind and strong’; embodying ‘steel and compassion’). We address her compassionate leadership through the lenses of paradox theory, legitimacy theory and conservation of resources theory. We contribute a heuristic framework that sees various types of legitimacy leveraged synergistically to build resources and alleviate suffering – providing further legitimacy in an upward spiral of compassionate leadership.
, Lindsay K. Campbell, Sophie Plitt, Michelle L. Johnson
Published: 26 November 2021
Frontiers in Sustainable Cities, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.3389/frsc.2021.725620

Abstract:
In addition to impacts on human health and the economy, COVID-19 is changing the way humans interact with open space. Across urban to rural settings, public lands–including forests and parks – experienced increases and shifts in recreational use. At the same time, certain public lands have become protest spaces as part of the public uprisings around racial injustice throughout the country. Land managers are adapting in real-time to compound disturbances. In this study, we explore the role of the public land manager during this time across municipal and federal lands and an urban-rural gradient. We ask: How adaptable are public land managers and agencies in their recreation management, collaborative partnerships, and public engagement to social disturbances such as COVID-19 and the co-occurring crisis of systemic racial injustice brought to light by the BLM uprisings and protests? This paper applies qualitative data drawn from a sample of land managers across the northeastern United States. We explore management in terms of partnership arrangements, recreational and educational programs, and stakeholder engagement practices and refine an existing model of organizational resilience. The study finds abiding: reports of increased public lands usership; calls for investment in maintenance; and need for diversity, equity, and inclusion in both organizational settings and landscapes themselves; and the need for workforce capacity. We discover effective ways to respond to compound disturbances that include open and reflective communication, transforming organizational cultures, and transboundary partnerships that are valued as critical assets.
, Sophie Johnson, Teela Clayton, Riko Kimoto, Bach Xuan Tran, Long Hoang Nguyen, Kisoo Park
Published: 3 August 2021
Frontiers in Communication, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.3389/fcomm.2021.731979

Abstract:
Saliou (Eur J Epidemiol, 1994, 10 (4), 515–517) argued that pandemics are special kinds of crises and requires the public health sector to focus on: 1) reducing uncertainty, 2) rumor mitigation, and 3) ensuring the public reduces their risk of contracting the disease. With this as a backdrop, the central aim of this research is to better understand the connections between public information seeking, evaluation, and self-protective behaviors in the COVID-19 pandemic and focuses on a comparison between the Republic of Korea and Vietnam to provide insights into the influence of the individual, institutional, and information factors influencing people’s experience with COVID-19. Thus, there are two major contributions of this study. First, it provides a cross-theory evaluation of the factors that contribute to information seeking, evaluation, and self-protective behaviors. Second, the study identifies potentially critical differences in information seeking, evaluation, and self-protective behaviors based on acute disease reproduction in countries with a successful pandemic suppression history. Findings suggest that in countries where there are high levels of trust and satisfaction even small changes in the infection rates lead to different information seeking and self-protective behaviors.
, Thomas Stoeckle
Published: 2 August 2021
Journal of Public Affairs; https://doi.org/10.1002/pa.2733

Abstract:
Positioning Covid-19 as a wicked problem we analyse the extent that the UK government adhered to the guidelines for dealing with such problems and the extent to which the management of the pandemic exacerbated the crisis. We argue the management of the pandemic saw a continuance of political communication as usual, focusing on emphasising the optimistic rhetoric which underpinned the Brexit narrative and 2019 election campaign which delivered Boris Johnson a majority. The failure to break out of a narrow permanent campaigning mindset which saw the pandemic as a brief interlude during a period when the focus was on delivering Brexit led to public confusion as optimistic claims were proven to be inaccurate and promises unreachable. Johnson's government's attempts to offer certainty despite a situation characterised by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity led to numerous U-turns that seriously damaged their credibility while the politicisation of the response led to poor decision making at key points. We therefore highlight the deficiencies of Johnson's strategy and highlight key lessons for communications professionals who navigate an increasingly volatile and uncertain world beset by wicked problems. In particularly we highlight the importance of depoliticising crises, seeking a diverse range of ideas and expertise, developing an empathic leadership style, starting a public conversation that recognises uncertainty and so develop a framework where wicked problems are a feature of public debate. We argue that failure in all of these areas contributed to the UK's poor comparative performance during the Covid-19 pandemic.
Journal of Change Management, Volume 21, pp 133-143; https://doi.org/10.1080/14697017.2021.1917489

Abstract:
MAD statement This leading article aims at Making a Difference (MAD) by inspiring to engage in new conventions for leadership and organizational change at a time when there is an opening for new practices to emerge. The COVID-19 pandemic upended much of what we take for granted, making us more aware of the ambiguity and multiplicity of reality, of the need for collaboration, adaptation and resilience, and of the embodied and material dimension of work life.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Change Management, Volume 21, pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1080/14697017.2021.1880092

Abstract:
MAD statement This leading article is setting out to Make a Difference (MAD) through catalysing the further exploration and development of leadership theory and practice by facilitating the reimagining and reframing of challenges and solutions ahead. It does so by integrating the academic concerns of the current literature with the issues raised by recent events marked by the cataclysmic end of the Trump presidency in the United States.
Helena Cristina Roque, Madalena Ramos
Responsible, Sustainable, and Globally Aware Management in the Fourth Industrial Revolution pp 363-385; https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-6926-9.ch020

Abstract:
COVID-19 was declared the pandemic on 11 March 2020, and the world is still in the throes of an unprecedented and highly unpredictable public health crisis, with consequences at an individual, group, organisational, and societal level. Under such dire circumstances, leadership is of decisive importance, as the repercussions of the decisions taken may, now more than ever, be crucial. Hence, leadership is currently essential not only for the success, but for the actual survival of organisations. In a scenario of ongoing change with unforeseeable outcomes, the absence of good leadership could mean the demise of an organisation. Grounded on the theory of responsible leadership and the theory of shared leadership, the authors present the good leadership practices that are considered essential during times of major unpredictability such those currently underway.
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