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(searched for: doi:10.1186/s12881-020-01156-1)
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, Akshay Kanakan, Janani Srinivasa Vasudevan, ,
Briefings in Functional Genomics; https://doi.org/10.1093/bfgp/elab037

Abstract:
Infectious diseases are potential drivers for human evolution, through a complex, continuous and dynamic interaction between the host and the pathogen/s. It is this dynamic interaction that contributes toward the clinical outcome of a pathogenic disease. These are modulated by contributions from the human genetic variants, transcriptional response (including noncoding RNA) and the pathogen’s genome architecture. Modern genomic tools and techniques have been crucial for the detection and genomic characterization of pathogens with respect to the emerging infectious diseases. Aided by next-generation sequencing (NGS), risk stratification of host population/s allows for the identification of susceptible subgroups and better disease management. Nevertheless, many challenges to a general understanding of host–pathogen interactions remain. In this review, we elucidate how a better understanding of the human host-pathogen interplay can substantially enhance, and in turn benefit from, current and future applications of multi-omics based approaches in infectious and rare diseases. This includes the RNA-level response, which modulates the disease severity and outcome. The need to understand the role of human genetic variants in disease severity and clinical outcome has been further highlighted during the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This would enhance and contribute toward our future pandemic preparedness.
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