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(searched for: doi:10.1016/j.hlc.2020.08.001)
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, Joanne Nolte, Stacey Matthews, Jennifer Angel, Ann Le, Andrew Moore, Tina Campbell,
Published: 28 November 2021
Journal of Advanced Nursing; https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.15104

Abstract:
Aim To describe a protocol for the pilot phase of a trial designed to test the effect of an mHealth intervention on representation and readmission after adult cardiac surgery. Design A multisite, parallel group, pilot randomized controlled trial (ethics approval: HREC2020.331-RMH69278). Methods Adult patients scheduled to undergo elective cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting, valve surgery, or a combination of bypass grafting and valve surgery or aortic surgery) will be recruited from three metropolitan tertiary teaching hospitals. Patients allocated to the control group with receive usual care that is comprised of in-patient discharge education and local paper-based written discharge materials. Patients in the intervention group will be provided access to tailored ‘GoShare’ mHealth bundles preoperatively, in a week of hospital discharge and 30 days after surgery. The mHealth bundles are comprised of patient narrative videos, animations and links to reputable resources. Bundles can be accessed via a smartphone, tablet or computer. Bundles are evidence-based and designed to improve patient self-efficacy and self-management behaviours, and to empower people to have a more active role in their healthcare. Computer-generated permuted block randomization with an allocation ratio of 1:1 will be generated for each site. At the time of consent, and 30, 60 and 90 days after surgery quality of life and level of patient activation will be measured. In addition, rates of representation and readmission to hospital will be tracked and verified via data linkage 1 year after the date of surgery. Discussion Interventions using mHealth technologies have proven effectiveness for a range of cardiovascular conditions with limited testing in cardiac surgical populations. Impact This study provides an opportunity to improve patient outcome and experience for adults undergoing cardiac surgery by empowering patients as end-users with strategies for self-help. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12621000082808.
, Xiang Zeng, Zufeng Ding, Fenghua Lv, Jawahar L. Mehta, Xianwei Wang
Published: 25 August 2021
Frontiers in Pharmacology, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2021.699949

Abstract:
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or COVID-19 infection is the cause of the ongoing global pandemic. Mortality from COVID-19 infection is particularly high in patients with cardiovascular diseases. In addition, COVID-19 patients with preexisting cardiovascular comorbidities have a higher risk of death. Main cardiovascular complications of COVID-19 are myocardial infarction, myocarditis, acute myocardial injury, arrhythmias, heart failure, stroke, and venous thromboembolism. Therapeutic interventions in terms of drugs for COVID-19 have many cardiac adverse effects. Here, we review the relative therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of anti-COVID-19 drugs.
, Joosup Kim, Emma K. Tod, Julie L. Morrison, Sibilah J. Breen, Katherine Jaques, Rohan Grimley, Brett Jones, Geoffrey C. Cloud, Timothy Kleinig, et al.
Published: 26 February 2021
Frontiers in Neurology, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2021.621495

Abstract:
We present information on acute stroke care for the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia using data from the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry (AuSCR). The first case of COVID-19 in Australia was recorded in late January 2020 and national restrictions to control the virus commenced in March. To account for seasonal effects of stroke admissions, patient-level data from the registry from January to June 2020 were compared to the same period in 2019 (historical-control) from 61 public hospitals. We compared periods using descriptive statistics and performed interrupted time series analyses. Perceptions of stroke clinicians were obtained from 53/72 (74%) hospitals participating in the AuSCR (80% nurses) via a voluntary, electronic feedback survey. Survey data were summarized to provide contextual information for the registry-based analysis. Data from the registry covered locations that had 91% of Australian COVID-19 cases to the end of June 2020. For the historical-control period, 9,308 episodes of care were compared with the pandemic period (8,992 episodes). Patient characteristics were similar for each cohort (median age: 75 years; 56% male; ischemic stroke 69%). Treatment in stroke units decreased progressively during the pandemic period (control: 76% pandemic: 70%, p < 0.001). Clinical staff reported fewer resources available for stroke including 10% reporting reduced stroke unit beds. Several time-based metrics were unchanged whereas door-to-needle times were longer during the peak pandemic period (March-April, 2020; 82 min, control: 74 min, p = 0.012). Our data emphasize the need to maintain appropriate acute stroke care during times of national emergency such as pandemic management.
, Salvatore Pepe, A. Robert Denniss
Published: 1 December 2020
Heart, Lung and Circulation, Volume 29, pp 1737-1740; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2020.10.008

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, Sally C. Inglis, Robyn Gallagher, Patricia M. Davidson
Published: 13 October 2020
Heart, Lung and Circulation, Volume 29, pp 1744-1748; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2020.09.921

Abstract:
“Nursing is the glue that holds everything together” Patricia M. Davidson [ 1 Davidson P.M. Stuck on nursing and proud of it [Blog]. John Hopkins Nursing Magazine, Baltimore, MD, 2013. https://magazine.nursing.jhu.edu/2013/12/stuck-on-nursing-and-proud-of-it/ Date accessed: September 28, 2020 Google Scholar ]
Skye Coote, , Elizabeth O’Brien,
Published: 9 October 2020
Heart, Lung and Circulation, Volume 29, pp 1895-1896; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2020.09.925

Abstract:
We thank Inglis and colleagues for the recent CSANZ COVID-19 Cardiovascular Nursing Care Consensus Statement [ 1 Inglis S.C. Naismith C. White K. Hendriks J.M. Bray J.E. Hickman L.D. et al. CSANZ COVID-19 cardiovascular nursing care consensus statement: executive summary. Heart Lung Circ. 2020; 29 : 1263-1267 Abstract Full Text Full Text PDF PubMed Scopus (2) Google Scholar ] and for highlighting important issues in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease nursing management during the COVID-19 pandemic. While many of the identified issues apply to patients with cardiac disease or stroke, several fundamental differences affecting patients with stroke require distinction.
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