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(searched for: doi:10.1016/j.oregeorev.2020.103589)
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Yangyang Zhang, , , Jiajun Liu, Jiang Wang, Zhongjian Zha, Haijun Bai
Published: 2 December 2021
Ore Geology Reviews, Volume 140; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oregeorev.2021.104626

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, Cristian Biagioni, Federica Zaccarini
Published: 19 November 2021
European Journal of Mineralogy, Volume 33, pp 717-726; https://doi.org/10.5194/ejm-33-717-2021

Abstract:
Gersdorffite, ideally NiAsS, and associated minerals from Contrada Zillì (Peloritani Mountains, Sicily, Italy) have been characterized through electron microprobe analysis and X-ray diffraction. Primary minerals, hosted in quartz veins, are represented by gersdorffite, tetrahedrite-(Fe), and chalcopyrite with minor pyrite and galena. Rare aikinite inclusions were observed in tetrahedrite-(Fe) and chalcopyrite. Gersdorffite occurs as euhedral to subhedral crystals, up to 1 mm in size, with (Sb,Bi)-enriched cores and (Fe,As)-enriched rims. Its chemical composition is (Ni0.79−0.95Fe0.18−0.04Co0.04−0.01)(As0.90−1.03Sb0.10−0.00Bi0.02−0.00)S0.98−0.92. It crystallizes in the space group P213, with unit-cell parameters a=5.6968(7) Å, V=184.88(7) Å3, and Z=4, and its crystal structure was refined down to R1= 0.035. Associated tetrahedrite-(Fe) has chemical formula (Cu5.79Ag0.07)Σ5.86(Cu3.96Fe1.59Zn0.45)Σ6.00(Sb3.95As0.17Bi0.03)Σ4.15S13.06, with unit-cell parameters a= 10.3815(10) Å, V=1118.9(3) Å3, and space group I-43m. Its crystal structure was refined to R1=0.027. Textural and crystallographic data suggest a polyphasic crystallization of gersdorffite under low-temperature conditions.
, Petr Drahota, , , Magdaléna Peřestá, Stefan Kiefer, Michael Stöger-Pollach, Nathalie Tepe, , Tomáš Mikuš, et al.
Published: 21 October 2021
Applied Geochemistry, Volume 135; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2021.105114

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Published: 8 August 2021
by MDPI
Abstract:
Thallium is a highly toxic metal and is predominantly hosted by sulfides associated with low-temperature hydrothermal mineralization. Weathering and oxidation of sulfides generate acid drainage with a high concentration of thallium, posing a threat to surrounding environments. Thallium may also be incorporated into secondary sulfate minerals, which act as temporary storage for thallium. We present a state-of-the-art review on the formation mechanism of the secondary sulfate minerals from thallium mineralized areas and the varied roles these sulfate minerals play in Tl mobility. Up to 89 independent thallium minerals and four unnamed thallium minerals have been documented. These thallium minerals are dominated by Tl sulfosalts and limited to several sites. Occurrence, crystal chemistry, and Tl content of the secondary sulfate minerals indicate that Tl predominantly occurs as Tl(I) in K-bearing sulfate. Lanmuchangite acts as a transient source and sink of Tl for its water-soluble feature, whereas dorallcharite, Tl-voltaite, and Tl-jarosite act as the long term source and sink of Tl in the surface environments. Acid and/or ferric iron derived from the dissolution of sulfate minerals may increase the pyrite oxidation process and Tl release from Tl-bearing sulfides in the long term.
Published: 15 February 2021
by MDPI
Abstract:
A suite of sulfate minerals from the Monte Arsiccio mine (Apuan Alps, Northern Tuscany, Italy), previously identified by using both X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy, was studied through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), in order to determine their trace-element content. Several elements (Tl, Rb, As, Sb, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Cr) were found above the detection limits. Among them, some are important from an environmental perspective and may reach relatively high concentrations (e.g., Tl = 1370–2988 μg/g; As = 505–1680 μg/g). Thus, these sulfates may act as transient sinks for some of these potentially toxic elements, as well as for sulfate ions and acidity. Indeed, dissolution experiments revealed the ability of these secondary minerals to produce a significant pH decrease of the solutions, as well as the release of Fe, Al, and K as major ions. This work discusses the relation between the budget of trace elements and the crystal chemistry of sulfate minerals and provides new insights about the environmental role played by the sulfate dissolution in controlling the quality of water in acid mine drainage systems.
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