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(searched for: doi:10.1111/tbed.13587)
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, Oleksii Solodiankin, Nataliia Rudova, Anton Gerilovych, Serhiy Nychyk, Natalia Hudz, Tetiana Ukhovska, Mykola Sytiuk, Volodymyr Polischuk, David Mustra, et al.
Veterinary Medicine and Science; https://doi.org/10.1002/vms3.578

Abstract:
A Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) questionnaire was designed to collect information on farmers’ knowledge of ASF and their practices surrounding that could impact the spread of the disease. The questionnaire was distributed, and data collected, from 233 backyard farmers from five selected Oblasts (Rivne, Kharkiv, Odessa, Zakarpattia and Kiev). Kruskal-Wallis tests were conducted to identify factors that could influence knowledge, and Dunn tests were performed to determine differences between groups when the Kruskal-Wallis tests were significant. Spearman tests were carried out to explore the association between knowledge and risky practices. Results show that comprehensive knowledge on ASF is not common in backyard farmers and that risky practices that influence the spread of ASF are regularly performed. Of the respondents, 47% felt well-informed about how ASF can be transmitted and 31.8% felt confident about recognizing clinical signs of ASF. The independent variable “Oblast” was identified as a significant factor (p = 0.0015) associated with differences in knowledge on clinical signs. We demonstrated statistically significant differences of knowledge between backyard farmers from different Oblasts. Knowledge of preventive measures was positively correlated with risky handling practices related to edible pork products (p = 0.0053) and non-edible pork products (p = 0.0417). In conclusion, our results show that backyard farmers have knowledge gaps on ASF and practice various risky behaviours that might favour the spread of the disease in Ukraine. There are regional differences in ASF knowledge and risky practices that should be taken into consideration in future evidence-based ASF prevention and control programs, including public awareness activities.
, Edwin Kangethe, Elizabeth Jane Poole, Nicholas Ndiwa, Emily Ouma, Iddo Dror
Frontiers in Veterinary Science, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2021.611263

Abstract:
We assessed the effectiveness of Interactive Voice Response (IVR) technology in delivering biosecurity messages for the control of African swine fever (ASF) in Uganda using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with 408 smallholder pig farmers. Our results show that IVR technology significantly improved knowledge of farmers who had not been exposed to training on biosecurity. Furthermore, it enhanced knowledge for farmers who had received face-to-face (f2f) training in biosecurity. This group of farmers recorded the highest knowledge gain following IVR training compared to farmers who did not receive f2f training. IVR technology was perceived by farmers as a new technology capable of transforming their lives because it is time efficient, has high potential for resource saving and flexibility. IVR also seems to be gender sensitive as it addresses some of the constraints women face in accessing conventional extension services such as time. IVR is an innovative way for delivery of advisory information to pig farmers. The scalability of IVR technology could further be explored and its feasibility assessed for wider use by the extension systems in Uganda and elsewhere.
Published: 2 February 2021
by MDPI
Abstract:
The spectacular recent spread of African swine fever (ASF) in Eastern Europe and Asia has been strongly associated, as it is in the endemic areas in Africa, with free-ranging pig populations and low-biosecurity backyard pig farming. Managing the disease in wild boar populations and in circumstances where the disease in domestic pigs is largely driven by poverty is particularly challenging and may remain so even in the presence of effective vaccines. The only option currently available to prevent ASF is strict biosecurity. Among small-scale pig farmers biosecurity measures are often considered unaffordable or impossible to implement. However, as outbreaks of ASF are also unaffordable, the adoption of basic biosecurity measures is imperative to achieve control and prevent losses. Biosecurity measures can be adapted to fit smallholder contexts, culture and costs. A longer-term approach that could prove valuable particularly for free-ranging pig populations would be exploitation of innate resistance to the virus, which is fully effective in wild African suids and has been observed in some domestic pig populations in areas of prolonged endemicity. We explore available options for preventing ASF in terms of feasibility, practicality and affordability among domestic pig populations that are at greatest risk of exposure to ASF.
, Walter Odongo, Tonny Aliro, Elly Kurobuza Ndyomugyenyi
Tropical Animal Health and Production, Volume 52, pp 3735-3744; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11250-020-02411-6

Abstract:
Pig farming has gained momentum for most smallholder farmers in developing countries as a means of livelihood and household incomes. However, prospects of the pig enterprises are constrained by pig health management issues which affect both its productivity and profitability. Using a cross-sectional survey of 240 smallholder pig farmers, we assessed factors influencing farmers’ access to veterinary services and expenditure on pig health management in northern Uganda. Data was analysed using the binary logit and censored tobit regression models. Access to veterinary services was significantly influenced by pig herd size (p < 0.05), Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) membership (p < 0.1), breed (p < 0.05), production system (p < 0.05) and number of health issues recorded on farm (p < 0.01). Education level (p < 0.01), farming household members (p < 0.05), pig herd size (p < 0.01), breed (p < 0.05), previous disease incidences (p < 0.05), household labour available (p < 0.1) and access to veterinary services (p < 0.01) significantly influenced pig health expenditure. Efforts to improve access to veterinary services and improve pig health management should focus on promoting more intensive production systems and improved breeds that are associated with better access to veterinary services and reduced cost of pig health management.
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