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(searched for: doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033322)
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, Marina Lleal, Sara Ortonobes, Maria Queralt Gorgas, Daniel Sevilla-Sánchez, Nuria Carballo, Elisabet De Jaime, Susana Herranz, on behalf of the MoPIM study group
Published: 11 January 2022
BMC Geriatrics, Volume 22, pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-021-02715-8

Abstract:
Objectives: The objectives of the present analyses are to estimate the frequency of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) at admission according to STOPP/START criteria version 2 in older patients hospitalised due to chronic disease exacerbation as well as to identify risk factors associated to the most frequent active principles as potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Methods: A multicentre, prospective cohort study including older patients (≥65) hospitalized due to chronic disease exacerbation at the internal medicine or geriatric services of 5 hospitals in Spain between September 2016 and December 2018 was conducted. Demographic and clinical data was collected, and a medication review process using STOPP/START criteria version 2 was performed, considering both PIMs and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs). Primary outcome was defined as the presence of any most frequent principles as PIMs, and secondary outcomes were the frequency of any PIM and PPO. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted on all outcomes and multilevel logistic regression analysis, stratified by participating centre, was performed on the primary outcome. Results: A total of 740 patients were included (mean age 84.1, 53.2% females), 93.8% of them presenting polypharmacy, with a median of 10 chronic prescriptions. Among all, 603 (81.5%) patients presented at least one PIP, 542 (73.2%) any PIM and 263 (35.5%) any PPO. Drugs prescribed without an evidence-based clinical indication were the most frequent PIM (33.8% of patients); vitamin D supplement in older people who are housebound or experiencing falls or with osteopenia was the most frequent PPO (10.3%). The most frequent active principles as PIMs were proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and benzodiazepines (BZDs), present in 345 (46.6%) patients. This outcome was found significantly associated with age, polypharmacy and essential tremor in an explanatory model with 71% AUC. Conclusions: PIMs at admission are highly prevalent in these patients, especially those involving PPIs or BZDs, which affected almost half of the patients. Therefore, these drugs may be considered as the starting point for medication review and deprescription. Trial registration number: NCT02830425
, Susana Herranz, Albert Roso-Llorach, Rosa Jordana, Concepción Violán, Marina Lleal, Pere Roura-Poch, Marta Arellano, Rafael Estrada, Gloria Julia Nazco
Published: 15 November 2021
by BMJ
Abstract:
Objectives: To estimate the frequency of chronic conditions and geriatric syndromes in older patients admitted to hospital because of an exacerbation of their chronic conditions, and to identify multimorbidity clusters in these patients.Design: Multicentre, prospective cohort study.Setting: Internal medicine or geriatric services of five general teaching hospitals in Spain.Participants: 740 patients aged 65 and older, hospitalised because of an exacerbation of their chronic conditions between September 2016 and December 2018.Primary and secondary outcome measures: Active chronic conditions and geriatric syndromes (including risk factors) of the patient, a score about clinical management of chronic conditions during admission, and destination at discharge were collected, among other variables. Multimorbidity patterns were identified using fuzzy c-means cluster analysis, taking into account the clinical management score. Prevalence, observed/expected ratio and exclusivity of each chronic condition and geriatric syndrome were calculated for each cluster, and the final solution was approved after clinical revision and discussion among the research team.Results: 740 patients were included (mean age 84.12 years, SD 7.01; 53.24% female). Almost all patients had two or more chronic conditions (98.65%; 95% CI 98.23% to 99.07%), the most frequent were hypertension (81.49%, 95% CI 78.53% to 84.12%) and heart failure (59.86%, 95% CI 56.29% to 63.34%). The most prevalent geriatric syndrome was polypharmacy (79.86%, 95% CI 76.82% to 82.60%). Four statistically and clinically significant multimorbidity clusters were identified: osteoarticular, psychogeriatric, cardiorespiratory and minor chronic disease. Patient-level variables such as sex, Barthel Index, number of chronic conditions or geriatric syndromes, chronic disease exacerbation 3 months prior to admission or destination at discharge differed between clusters.Conclusions: In older patients admitted to hospital because of the exacerbation of chronic health problems, it is possible to define multimorbidity clusters using soft clustering techniques. These clusters are clinically relevant and could be the basis to reorganise healthcare circuits or processes to tackle the increasing number of older, multimorbid patients.Trial registration number: NCT02830425.
, Pär Schön, Nicola Orsini, Johan Fastbom, Bo Burström, Janne Agerholm
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health; https://doi.org/10.1177/14034948211018384

Abstract:
Aims: Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications (PIM) are risk factors for negative health outcomes among older people. This study aimed to investigate socio-demographic differences in polypharmacy and PIM use among older people with different care needs in a standard versus an integrated care setting. Methods: Population-based register data on residents aged ⩾65 years in Stockholm County based on socio-demographic background and social care use in 2014 was linked to prescription drug use in 2015. A logistic regression analysis was used to estimate socio-demographic differences in polypharmacy and PIM, adjusting for education, age group, sex, country of birth, living alone, morbidity and dementia by care setting based on area and by care need (i.e. independent, home help or institutionalised). Results: The prevalence of polypharmacy and PIM was greater among home-help users (60.4% and 11.5% respectively) and institutional residents (74.4% and 11.9%, respectively). However, there were greater socio-demographic differences among the independent, with those with lower education, older age and females having higher odds of polypharmacy and PIM. Morbidity was a driver of polypharmacy (odds ratio (OR)=1.19, confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.22) among home-help users. Dementia diagnosis was associated with reduced odds of polypharmacy and PIM among those in institutions (OR=0.78, CI 0.71–0.87 and OR 0.52, CI 0.45–0.59, respectively) and of PIM among home-help users (OR=0.53, 95% CI 0.42–0.67). Conclusions: Polypharmacy and PIM were associated with care needs, most prevalent among home-help users and institutional residents, but socio-demographic differences were most prominent among those living independently, suggesting that municipal care might reduce differences between socio-demographic groups. Care setting had little effect on inappropriate drug use, indicating that national guidelines are followed.
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