Refine Search

New Search

Results: 5

(searched for: doi:10.1080/23311932.2019.1645258)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
, Hupenyu A. Mupambwa, Patrick Nyambo, Binganidzo Muchara, Carlos W. T. Nantapo
Handbook of Climate Change Management pp 591-611; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-57281-5_322

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 9 October 2021
by MDPI
Clean Technologies, Volume 3, pp 711-742; https://doi.org/10.3390/cleantechnol3040043

Abstract:
A number of technological challenges need to be overcome if algae are to be utilized for commercial fuel production. Current economic assessment is largely based on laboratory scale up or commercial systems geared to the production of high value products, since no industrial scale plant exits that are dedicated to algal biofuel. For macroalgae (‘seaweeds’), the most promising processes are anaerobic digestion for biomethane production and fermentation for bioethanol, the latter with levels exceeding those from sugar cane. Currently, both processes could be enhanced by increasing the rate of degradation of the complex polysaccharide cell walls to generate fermentable sugars using specifically tailored hydrolytic enzymes. For microalgal biofuel production, open raceway ponds are more cost-effective than photobioreactors, with CO2 and harvesting/dewatering costs estimated to be ~50% and up to 15% of total costs, respectively. These costs need to be reduced by an order of magnitude if algal biodiesel is to compete with petroleum. Improved economics could be achieved by using a low-cost water supply supplemented with high glucose and nutrients from food grade industrial wastewater and using more efficient flocculation methods and CO2 from power plants. Solar radiation of not <3000 h·yr−1 favours production sites 30° north or south of the equator and should use marginal land with flat topography near oceans. Possible geographical sites are discussed. In terms of biomass conversion, advances in wet technologies such as hydrothermal liquefaction, anaerobic digestion, and transesterification for algal biodiesel are presented and how these can be integrated into a biorefinery are discussed.
, Hupenyu A. Mupambwa, , Binganidzo Muchara, Carlos W. T. Nantapo
Handbook of Climate Change Management pp 1-21; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-22759-3_322-1

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
K. S. Sastry Musti
Green Public Procurement Strategies for Environmental Sustainability pp 186-206; https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-3343-7.ch009

Abstract:
Climatic changes can cause severe food and water shortages, and desert nations such as Namibia can be challenged more than other countries for obvious reasons. Dependency on imports for food and electricity in Namibia is continuous in recent times. However, Industry 4.0-based large-scale symbiotic systems can potentially help in achieving a sustainable food security regime, as they operate under controlled conditions. Namibia is blessed with abundant sunshine and land availability, and hence, ample opportunities do exist for producing solar energy, which is used to meet the energy requirements of symbiotic systems. This chapter examines typical local operating conditions and then makes a strong case for fully automated symbiotic systems that use low-cost desalination and renewable energies.
, Balasuramani Ravindran, Ernest Dube, Noxolo S. Lukashe, Asteria A. N. Katakula, Pearson N. S. Mnkeni
Earthworm Assisted Remediation of Effluents and Wastes pp 299-331; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-4522-1_18

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top