Refine Search

New Search

Results: 2

(searched for: doi:10.29252/sjnmp.3.4.67)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Sahar Ahmadi,
Journal of Healthcare Engineering, Volume 2022, pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.1155/2022/8608732

Abstract:
Objective. It is important to evaluate the long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the intention of midwives to leave their jobs. The study examined the relationship between burnout and the intent to leave work among midwives who worked at Ayatollah Mousavi Hospital of Zanjan, one year after the COVID-19 outbreak. Method. In a descriptive-analytical study, the intention of 88 midwives to leave their jobs was evaluated, one year after the outbreak of COVID-19 disease in 2021. The midwives were selected using convenience sampling methods. Data were collected using the Maslach burnout questionnaire and the Anticipated Turnover Scale (ATS). Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, Pearson correlation coefficient, and multiple linear regression model with the stepwise method at a 95 confidence level. Results. The mean intention to leave the job was 29.71±6.75. Most of the midwives reported a moderate level of intention to leave the job (47.7). There was a significant positive correlation between the intention to leave the job and all three components of burnout. The stepwise regression analyses indicated that emotional exhaustion (β=0.344) and working rotational shifts (β=0.276) were significant predictors of intent to leave the job. Conclusions. It can be concluded that the intention to leave the job of midwives was moderate. Given the relationship between emotional exhaustion and the intent to leave the job, interventions to increase the mental strength and resilience of midwives during the COVID-19 pandemic seem necessary.
Maryam Hajiesmaello, , Hedyeh Riazi, Hamid Alavi Majd, Roya Yavarian
Published: 24 January 2022
BMC Psychiatry, Volume 22, pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-022-03707-7

Abstract:
Background: The present qualitative study was conducted to explain the experiences of secondary traumatic stress (STS) and its related factors in midwives working in maternity wards. Methods: Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 11 midwives working in the maternity wards of hospitals in Urmia, Iran, through in-depth interviews with open-ended questions. Data were analyzed using the conventional content analysis approach. Results: The results of data analysis led to the extraction of three themes, seven main categories, and 18 subcategories. The first theme was “STS stimuli,” with the two categories of “Discriminatory approach to midwifery” and “The nature of the midwifery profession”. The second theme was “Traumatic outcomes”, which included the subcategories of “Psychological-emotional trauma”, “Physical trauma” and “Social trauma”. The third theme was “Risk management”, which had the two subcategories of “Reactive approach” and “Proactive approach”. Conclusions: The results showed that, in addition to the traumatic nature of events that midwives experience during work as the secondhand victims, factors such as governance-organizational structure, unbalanced distribution of power, and poor supportive laws undermine their professional role and provide conditions conducive to STS. Therefore, avoiding traumatic situations and scientific and skill self-empowerment were the most important strategies adopted by the midwives in this study to prevent risky situations and cope with the consequences of STS. The participation of midwifery stakeholders in policy-making and adopting supportive legislation in redefining the position and role of midwives can play a major role in reducing STS and sustaining their role and position in maternal care.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top