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(searched for: doi:10.5465/amp.2018.0083)
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Handbook of Research on Industrial Informatics and Manufacturing Intelligence pp 195-220; https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-3850-0.ch008

Abstract:
The purpose of this chapter is to provide a synthesis of urban visibilities and invisibilities in smart cities and regions as presented throughout this book. Key elements including dimensions, relationships, theory, and methods are presented in developing an integrated conceptual framework for the interweaving of the visible and invisible as InVisibilities in relation to the ambient in smart cities. Tables are included that enable summary and comparative views across chapters pertaining to findings, insights, ideas, exercise questions, and future directions for research and practice. This chapter makes a contribution to 1) emerging research and practice for ambient InVisibilities in smart cities; 2) the synthesizing of urban theory and methods pertaining to the visible and invisible dimensions of 21st century cities and urban regions; and 3) the extending of understandings pertaining to smart cities through of a conceptual framework for visibilities, invisibilities, and the ambient encompassing the physical and digital as a guide for theory and practice going forward.
Handbook of Research on Industrial Informatics and Manufacturing Intelligence pp 141-168; https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-3850-0.ch006

Abstract:
The purpose of this chapter is to explore urban visibilities and invisibilities in terms of the physical, digital, less tangible, and ambient in relation to the need for new methodologies and approaches in understanding and designing for smart cities. This chapter seeks to shed light on the interweaving of elements in urban environments informing methodologies for smart cities. The research literature for urban methodologies and approaches in the context of visibilities and invisibilities is explored in this chapter for smart cities and regions. Using an exploratory case study approach combined with an explanatory correlational design, placemaking and attuning to urban spaces are investigated as proxies for InVisibilities and the ambient.
Handbook of Research on Industrial Informatics and Manufacturing Intelligence pp 170-194; https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-3850-0.ch007

Abstract:
The purpose of this chapter is to explore urban visibilities and invisibilities through the use of ambient approaches and inquires in smart cities and regions. As such, this chapter seeks to further operationalize elements of ambient InVisibilities advanced in this book, incorporating livability and well-being and challenges and opportunities associated with data. The research literature for well-being and livability in relation to urban data visibilities and invisibilities is explored in this chapter in the context of smart and responsive cities. Using an exploratory case study approach, combined with an explanatory correlational design, selected elements of urban life in smart cities are is investigated. This chapter makes a contribution to 1) the research literature for well-being and livability and other emergent complexities associated with data in the context of smart cities and 2) the evolving of theory through formulation of a conceptual framework for augmented awareness for ambient Invisibilities in smart cities.
Heidi Collins, Yvonne McNulty
German Journal of Human Resource Management: Zeitschrift für Personalforschung, Volume 34, pp 202-227; https://doi.org/10.1177/2397002220908425

Abstract:
Insider researchers in international human resource management study not only the organisations or communities they may be members of, but also the people they perceive closeness with or with whom they share identities. The research context for insiders is rich but rarely problem-free. The uncertainty and dynamism of insider research often leaves insider researchers grappling with methodological and ethical challenges, but with no explicit framework to guide how they can be addressed in research practice or research reporting. Indeed, the ‘sanitised’ methodologies appearing in published work often do not reflect the complexity of the authors’ experience. In this article, we call for researchers to give more explicit consideration of what it means to research from an insider position, regardless of the research paradigm from which they work. The article addresses some of the messy details of insider research, drawing on personal accounts of our own research practice. We offer a framework of researcher personae as a tool for reflecting upon researchers’ insider positionality before, during and after data have been collected and analysed. Overall, we encourage researchers working from insider positions to adopt three practices: (1) to engage in reflexive consideration of the effects of (changing) positionality on their work as a way to strengthen the ethical and theoretical outcomes of research practice; (2) to acknowledge and leverage, rather than conceal, insiderness as a key strategy for making feasible more research on sensitive and ‘taboo’ topics; and (3) to make positionality explicit in research reporting in order to enhance the quality of insider research as well as enhance fieldwork learning more generally in the international human resource management field. While the personal accounts we share in this article are based on our research within the field of international human resource management, the intention is that it may also be of value to researchers in other fields.
Teresa M Amabile
Work, Aging and Retirement, Volume 5, pp 207-211; https://doi.org/10.1093/workar/waz007

Abstract:
Quantitative research, using surveys and archival data, has contributed much to the field’s understanding of the retirement transition, the factors influencing it, and its consequences. In this commentary, I argue that, in order to move to a deeper understanding of retirement decisions, retirement processes, and retirement experiences, researchers must add rigorous qualitative studies to their portfolios. Only by asking open-ended questions of people approaching, moving through, or living in retirement can we illuminate deeper psychological issues such as identity maintenance and change, the reconstruction of life narratives and structures, the reciprocal influence of relationships on individual decisions and experiences, and the confrontation of existential questions about the meaning of one’s life.
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