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(searched for: doi:10.1080/02763893.2019.1597803)
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International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159120

Abstract:
Age-friendly communities (AFCs) are an important measure for fostering active aging. The key to achieving an age-friendly living environment is to construct or renovate it according to the residents’ demands. To date, very few studies have attempted to delve into the AFCs’ environmental demand from different groups’ perspectives. Based on the theory of place attachment, the aim of this paper is to explore the demand diversity of different groups for the AFC environment. This study employs the nonparametric test and the Ordinal Priority Approach (OPA) to investigate the demands from the residents’ perspectives, and is enhanced by incorporating experts’ opinions. The empirical analysis shows that residents have a high level of demand for the physical environment (indoor and outdoor) and social environment (community services and social participation). At the same time, experts advocate the importance of using digital technologies to support people aged 45–65 who have higher requirements for a community environment than older adults. The findings also show that other backgrounds, such as gender, living arrangements, and year of the community establishment, lead to different demands. However, the impact of residents’ education level, occupation, income, and self-care ability on the environmental demands is low. Based on the research findings, the paper provides some practical suggestions for the future design and development of AFCs.
, Margie Rahmann, Ellen de Jong
Published: 11 October 2021
Building Research & Information, Volume 50, pp 19-35; https://doi.org/10.1080/09613218.2021.1984867

Abstract:
Although people are living longer, well-being and quality of life (QoL) are not guaranteed. The built environment is recognized as influencing health outcomes across lifespans. This narrative review takes a cross-disciplinary approach to understand the current evidence of the relationship between design, healthy ageing and QoL. Diverse methods were used to search for relevant literature, including database, and reference list search. Sixty-five papers were deemed relevant and included in this review. Seven main themes emerged through inductive thematic analysis. The extracted literature suggests there is good evidence for the role of biophilia, and indoor environmental quality; emerging evidence for technology, wayfinding, and opportunities for social interactions; but limited evidence for safety/security and adaptability/fit. One significant consideration for healthy ageing was older adults maintaining agency in their lives, including the ability to exert control over their environment in order to support healthy ageing. Design decisions have a significant impact on the health and well-being of older adults, but these decisions are often made in the absence of strong scientific evidence. This review sets out to assist decision-makers to consider design principles that support healthy ageing.
Published: 15 October 2020
Journal of Aging and Environment pp 1-24; https://doi.org/10.1080/26892618.2020.1833397

Abstract:
An overview of housing assessment tools developed or adapted for research use in East and Southeast Asia is currently lacking. A scoping review was conducted to address this knowledge gap. PubMed, Web of Science and CINAHL were searched for relevant scientific literature, and 22 articles were selected. Besides study-specific checklists, two assessment tools validated for use in Asia and three validated in other countries were identified. The tools were limited in scope and mostly concerned potential injury hazards. Issues such as indoor temperature and housing accessibility also need to be included to comprehensively assess the home environment in Asian countries.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093298

Abstract:
This study identified predictors of satisfaction with care services among family members of older adults residing in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). In this cross-sectional descriptive study, the participants were 330 family members of older adult residents of LTCFs in Seoul, Gyeonggi, Gangwon, Gyeongbuk, and Chungnam, Korea. Data were collected from July to October 2018 using a structured self-report questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent t-testing, one-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis testing, Pearson’s correlation coefficients, and hierarchical multiple regressions. The most important predictors of satisfaction with care services were satisfaction with the physical housing environment (β = 0.49, p < 0.001), caregiving stress (β = −0.30, p < 0.001), the facility’s size (β = −0.13, p = 0.001), the number of visits to the facility (β = −0.10, p = 0.024), and the number of family members who participated in the decision to place the relative in a facility (β = 0.09, p = 0.033). This study is significant because it provides fundamental data for qualitatively improving care services in LTCFs. Based on the results, strategies should be developed to relieve caregiving stress among family members and improve satisfaction with the physical housing environment.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244961

Abstract:
Maintaining health and improving the quality of life of the elderly is extremely challenging in an aging society. In this study, the relationship between housing and the independence and functional capabilities of the elderly is examined, and the effect of housing conditions on health improvements and their economic benefits for the elderly in terms of medical expenditures are assessed. The study is based on the Chinese Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), which was conducted in 2011 and 2013. Two indices that measure housing conditions and the health status of the elderly were run through regression and state-transition models. Housing was found to have a positive relationship with the health of the elderly, and the improvement of housing conditions could significantly change health status and decrease medical expenditures. The importance of maintaining the health of the elderly through housing adaptations and the economic benefits of housing interventions are highlighted, as these can contribute to both public health and housing adaption subsidy policies.
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