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(searched for: doi:10.1080/02763893.2019.1593280)
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I. V. Kristinsdottir, P. V. Jonsson, I. Hjaltadottir, K. Bjornsdottir
Published: 29 October 2021
BMC Health Services Research, Volume 21, pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-07197-3

Abstract:
Policymakers advocate extended residence in private homes as people age, rather than relocation to long-term care facilities. Consequently, it is expected that older people living in their own homes will be frailer and have more complex health problems over time. Therefore, community care for aging people is becoming increasingly important to facilitate prevention of decline in physical and cognitive abilities and unnecessary hospital admission and transfer to a nursing home. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the characteristic of home care clients and home care provided in five European countries between 2001 and 2014 and to explore whether home care clients who are most in need of care receive the care required. This descriptive study used data from two European research projects, Aged in Home Care (AdHOC; 2001–2002) and Identifying best practices for care-dependent elderly by Benchmarking Costs and outcomes of Community Care (IBenC; 2014–2016). In both projects, the InterRAI-Home Care assessment tool was used to assess a random sample of home care clients 65 years and older in five European countries. These data facilitate a comparison of physical and cognitive health and the provided home care between countries and study periods. In most participating countries, both cognitive (measured on the Cognitive Performance Scale) and functional ability (measured on the Activities of Daily Living Hierarchy scale) of home care clients deteriorated over a 10-year period. Home care provided increased between the studies. Home care clients who scored high on the physical and cognitive scales also received home care for a significantly higher duration than those who scored low. Older people in several European countries remain living in their own homes despite deteriorating physical and cognitive skills. Home care services to this group have increased. This indicates that the government policy of long-term residence at own home among older people, even in increased frailty, has been realised.
, Anne Dickerson, Isabelle Gélinas, Priscilla Harries, Isabel Margot-Cattin, Barbara Mazer, Tadhg Stapleton, Lizette Swanepoel, Amanda Timmer, Lana Van Niekerk, et al.
Published: 30 March 2021
Ageing and Society, Volume 42, pp 1938-1963; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0144686x20001968

Abstract:
Community mobility using private and public transportation is important for maintaining health, social participation and living well in later life. This international cross-sectional cohort study (N = 246) reported on the health and driving status of older adults from seven countries where the mobility patterns of drivers and non-drivers were compared in terms of city and rural areas, weather, as well as their respective differences in the number of out-of-home places accessed and quality of life. Older adults participated in a semi-structured interview and completed four standardised instruments: the EQ-5D-5L, modified PULSES health profile, modified Transportation Questionnaire, and the Transport – Participation in Activities and Places Outside the Home. Results suggested inclement weather and place of residence negatively impacted out-of-home activities but did not increase use of public transportation. Drivers accessed more out-of-home activities than non-drivers, suggesting higher community participation among this group, and quality of life was generally high among all participants, but slightly higher for drivers. Findings indicate that a complex myriad of factors can influence community mobility in older adults and further investigations are needed to understand patterns of transport in later life, particularly with regard to those factors that promote and maintain transport mobility, and relationships between transport mobility, community participation and quality of life.
, Brian Buta, Kevin D. Bader, Casey Hanley, Nancy L. Schoenborn, Matthew McNabney,
Published: 4 February 2021
Journal: BMC Geriatrics
BMC Geriatrics, Volume 21, pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-021-02041-z

Abstract:
Background Frailty syndrome disproportionately affects older people, including 15% of non-nursing home population, and is known to be a strong predictor of poor health outcomes. There is a growing interest in incorporating frailty assessment into research and clinical practice, which may provide an opportunity to improve in home frailty assessment and improve doctor patient communication. Methods We conducted focus groups discussions to solicit input from older adult care recipients (non-frail, pre-frail, and frail), their informal caregivers, and medical providers about their preferences to tailor a mobile app to measure frailty in the home using sensor based technologies. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed thematically. Results We identified three major themes: 1) perspectives of frailty; 2) perceptions of home based sensors; and 3) data management concerns. These relate to the participants’ insight, attitudes and concerns about having sensor-based technology to measure frailty in the home. Our qualitative findings indicate that knowing frailty status is important and useful and would allow older adults to remain independent longer. Participants also noted concerns with data management and the hope that this technology would not replace in-person visits with their healthcare provider. Conclusions This study found that study participants of each frailty status expressed high interest and acceptance of sensor-based technologies. Based on the qualitative findings of this study, sensor-based technologies show promise for frailty assessment of older adults with care needs. The main concerns identified related to the volume of data collected and strategies for responsible and secure transfer, reporting, and distillation of data into useful and timely care information. Sensor-based technologies should be piloted for feasibility and utility. This will inform the larger goal of helping older adults to maintain independence while tracking potential health declines, especially among the most vulnerable, for early detection and intervention. Keywords: Frailty, wearable, health services.
Published: 29 January 2020
Journal of Aging and Environment, Volume 34, pp 389-401; https://doi.org/10.1080/26892618.2019.1707737

Abstract:
Older adults wish to remain in their homes as long as they are able, but little research has evaluated what role housing plays in the decision to age in place. Qualitative interviews of aging services providers and focus groups with older adults provide insight into needs for home improvement while aging in place and the effects those needs may have on deciding to relocate. In light of the recent CHRONIC Care Act and resultant new access to potential home improvement assistance for some older adults, findings from this study highlight the importance of maintaining independence while increasing older adults’ awareness of and access to home improvements to support aging in place.
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