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(searched for: doi:10.1080/02763893.2018.1561593)
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Published: 6 October 2021
Journal of Aging and Environment pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/26892618.2021.1987372

Abstract:
This ethnographic study explores an old age home in a former township in Walvis Bay, Namibia as an institution to investigate its potential to be interwoven in community care services for older adults. Interviews with older adults from the community revealed highly negative opinions about the residence that equated it to an institution. These opinions are compared with conditions in the OAH and the residents’ views. The old age home was much more heterogenous as regards the composition of residents than what was perceived by older adults who lived in the community, who considered the home an option only for people who were childless or had been abandoned. Older adults who voluntarily lived alone in the home represented a new lifestyle that challenged the traditional family care practice that is the norm in later life. There was however some truth to the interviewees’ perceptions of coercive elements, both in terms of practices and architectural design. The paper argues that it is necessary to reduce the stigma that prevents residential care from being an accepted part of community care and a housing option in the future. The study result shows a number of potentialities that can contribute to this.
, Jennifer Ozmetin, Judith Beverly,
Published: 11 December 2020
Journal of Aging and Environment, Volume 35, pp 433-449; https://doi.org/10.1080/26892618.2020.1858383

Abstract:
With the increase in life expectancy in the United States comes an increase in years lived with a disability and poverty. This necessitates age-friendly, affordable housing that is appropriate for older adults with disabilities. Board and care homes provide housing and services for older adults with disabilities. This scoping review maps the literature on board and care homes in the United States following the age-friendly communities framework. A synthesis of articles (n = 10) revealed that board and care homes, while probably affordable, can be unsafe; variable in services provided; are mostly unregulated; and may lack opportunities for socialization.
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