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(searched for: doi:10.1007/s10603-018-9401-4)
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Published: 29 September 2022
by MDPI
Journal: Sustainability
Sustainability, Volume 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912398

Abstract:
Vehicle electrification has been promoted as an effective way to tackle environmental issues and the energy crisis worldwide. Being the largest auto market, China witnessed a dramatic increase of sale volume and market share of electric vehicles recently, while the incentives kept decreasing. Normative factors have been found to effectively explain consumers’ intention to adopt electric vehicles, but the mechanism remains to be discovered. One of the culture’s orientations, namely collectivism, has been proved to have significant impact on consumption behaviors, but the influence of collectivism on intention to adopt electric vehicles in China needs further discussion. Based on 433 questionnaires collected from Chinese consumers, this study adopted the Value–Belief–Norm (VBN) framework and examined collectivism as a moderator variable on the relationship between personal norms and intention to adopt electric vehicles. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS 27 and PLS-SEM (SmartPLS 3). The results show that the VBN framework successfully explains the intention to adopt electric vehicles of Chinese consumers, and collectivism has a significant positive moderating effect on the relationship between personal norms and intention to adopt electric vehicles. Insights and suggestions from theoretical and managerial perspectives on how to accelerate electric vehicle adoption are discussed for marketers, policymakers and industry practitioners.
Johann M. Majer, Heike A. Henscher, Paula Reuber, Denise Fischer-Kreer, Daniel Fischer
Published: 1 September 2022
Sustainable Production and Consumption, Volume 33, pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.spc.2022.06.012

Published: 3 October 2021
by MDPI
Journal: Sustainability
Sustainability, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910997

Abstract:
Social scientists have argued that ethical consumption is embedded into broader lifestyles running across various domains of social life. For instance, fair trade consumption might be part of a distinctive lifestyle, including behaviors such as going to fancy restaurants or the opera. We, therefore, investigate the relationships of the main dimensions of broader lifestyles to various aspects of fair trade consumption—from purchase frequency, to visiting specialized stores, to the identification with fair trade. The analysis relies on data collected in the Summer of 2011 in Zurich, Switzerland. Since per capita consumption of fair trade products in this country was on a comparatively high level, the results are also important for other societies experiencing only currently the mainstreaming of fair trade. The first dimension, distinctiveness of lifestyles, denoting orientations and behaviors with high social prestige in society, emerges as a substantial and important determinant of all included aspects of fair trade consumption. The second dimension, modernity, is only correlated with a subset of these aspects. These effects are robust, even when taking ethical and political orientations and resource endowment into account. Hence, differences between lifestyle groups do not simply reflect the social position of high-status consumers or their ethical and political views. They reflect orientations, mental representations and routines specific to these social groups. Broader lifestyles are, therefore, a relevant addition to explanations of fair trade consumption.
Published: 18 August 2021
by MDPI
Journal: Sustainability
Sustainability, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169249

Abstract:
Intentions have been described as a key driver of sustainable entrepreneurial opportunity recognition and eventually activity. As a result of this study, interest may increase in entrepreneurship intentions across numerous entrepreneurial levels and styles, specifically from the point of view of sustainability. However, research to date has not been able to completely determine how the intrinsic complications of instantaneously producing social, environmental, and economic means will have an impact on the intentions of university students. This study sought to inspect the impact of self-transcending and self-enhancing value on the advent of intentions. The theory of planned behavior is an adaptive theory that this study quantitatively analyzed using a structural equation model and survey data from 577 university students in Punjab, Pakistan. The empirical findings show that altruistic, biospheric, hedonic, and egoistic values all have an indirect effect on sustainability-driven entrepreneurial intentions, which is important to understand when assessing attitudes toward sustainable entrepreneurship and perceived behavior control. In essence, attitudes, perceived behavior, and social norms all affect aspirations to become a sustainable entrepreneur. In real-world terms, the findings indicate that by using value activation techniques to increase attitudes and educational interest, practitioners may promote sustainable entrepreneurial intentions. It is also suggested how government services could be improved as part of the strategy.
Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, Volume 33, pp 168-192; https://doi.org/10.1080/10495142.2020.1865235

Abstract:
In this paper, I argue that the historical change in the organizational logic of the Fair Trade movement, embodied by Fair Trade labeling, has had an important effect on the emergence of ethical consumption in Europe. By establishing Fair Trade labels, the initial movement logic of political influence through education was supplemented and partly abandoned in favor of a market logic. Fair Trade movements in Western Europe differ in the way they organize and market fair traded goods. Drawing on organizational institutionalism and social movement theories of economic opportunity structures, it is elaborated how the emergence of a new organizational form and its underlying logic shape consumption patterns. Hypotheses are empirically tested using a quantitative multilevel design. Organizational data on national Fair Trade movements compiled from an organizational survey of the European Fair Trade Association are combined with individual-level survey data of the 1997 Eurobarometer for 12 European countries. Logistic hierarchical regression models reveal the crucial importance of the Fair Trade labels once diffused into consumer markets, controlling for organizational communication efforts as well as the number of distribution channels for individual Fair Trade consumption. Thus, adopting a market logic has been a powerful force in rendering Fair Trade successful.
Tim Eberhardt, Marco Hubert, Helena Maria Lischka, Mirja Hubert, Zhibin Lin
Published: 16 November 2020
Journal of Consumer Marketing, Volume 38, pp 58-68; https://doi.org/10.1108/jcm-08-2019-3356

Abstract:
Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine how subjective knowledge about fair trade products and the perceived trustworthiness of information about fair trade goods influence purchase intention and reported purchase behaviour across two product categories, namely, fashion and food. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from an online survey with a sample of 1,616 consumers in four European countries, namely, Germany, Italy, Austria and the UK. Findings The results show that subjective knowledge moderates the positive relationship between intentions to purchase and reported purchase behaviour of fair trade products, however, the moderating role of perceived information trustworthiness was not significant. Furthermore, both the intention to purchase and reported purchase behaviour are significantly lower for fair trade fashion products than for fair trade food products. Practical implications This paper shows how fair trade consumption behaviour is mainly influenced by subjective knowledge about fair trade products. It reveals existing differences in both the buying intentions and reported purchase behaviour in different European markets. Originality/value This research broadens the understanding of consumers’ fair trade consumption behaviour across two different product categories and four different countries, with a focus on the interaction effect of consumers’ subjective knowledge and information trustworthiness.
Kaifeng Zhang, , Ping Wang
Published: 1 January 2020
Cogent Business & Management, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.1080/23311975.2020.1734345

Abstract:
For two decades, fair trade has served as an alternative approach of trading that encourages minimal returns, sustainability, and ethics, by offering producers in developing countries better trading conditions and secured rights. This movement has emerged recently in China, with companies involving domestic trading between richer and poorer regions. However, lack of third-party certification, standardization, process control, public awareness, and brand recognition continue to be challenges. To understand the current fair trade business in China, this paper investigates important decision-making areas from a supply chain management perspective. With the nature of empirical studies, an in-depth case analysis of a fair trade craft company has been conducted along with the purchasing and supplier relationship management, internal operations, and marketing and customer relationship management. This company currently combines the role of fair trade organization and retailer, by implementing an in-house certification system and vertically integrating the supply chain. Findings also highlight risk at each stage of supply chain. Compared with the western society, the unique features of Chinese fair trade business are captured with prioritized areas for improvement. This research contributes to the fair trade literature by providing exploratory study into emerging issues in the supply chain, particularly inside developing countries. The recommendations also create value for policy-makers and practitioners of fair trade companies.
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