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(searched for: doi:10.1080/24721840.2018.1553567)
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Bilal Kilic, Melis Tabak
Published: 27 May 2022
Abstract:
In this study, we set out to estimate the prevalence of presenteeism and to define its possible association with organizational factors, committing errors and stress among ab-initio pilots. Presenteeism is a major safety-related issue and has been extensively studied in a variety of occupation groups. As a cross-sectional study, a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data from ab-initio pilots. The participants assessed themselves on the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6). Correlation analysis was performed to explore the association between organizational factors and presenteeism. Based on the findings, the prevalence of presenteeism was 29.1 percent among the ab-initio pilots (N=175). Furthermore, there was a strong association between training-related stress (p< 0.01) and presenteeism. The student pilots with presenteeism were found to make mistakes during flight. Better and effective supervision for ab-initio pilots was associated with lower levels of presenteeism, highlighting the need for a supportive and comfortable atmosphere in the flight deck in which ab-initio pilots may feel comfortable. The findings presented here may facilitate improvements in the field of aviation safety.
, Joan Cahill, Keith Gaynor
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors, Volume 11, pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1027/2192-0923/a000199

Abstract:
Increasing evidence suggests that commercial airline pilots can experience physical, mental, and social health difficulties. Qualitative interviews with commercial airline pilots explored the relationship between work-related stress and well-being. Participatory workshops involving pilots were conducted. The methodology of this action-based research involved a blend of person-centered design approaches; specifically, “stakeholder evaluation” and “participatory design.” The findings further support the hypothesis that pilot well-being is being negatively affected by the nature of their work. The biopsychosocial model of the lived experience of a pilot, as presented in this paper, provides a useful structure to examine pilot well-being, and to identify and scope potential coping strategies to self-manage health and well-being issues associated with the job of being a pilot.
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