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(searched for: doi:10.20886/jpht)
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, Harry P. Andreassen, Christina Skarpe
Journal of Sustainable Forestry, Volume 39, pp 494-510; https://doi.org/10.1080/10549811.2019.1686029

Abstract:
Forest rehabilitation is when a desired tree species is planted in degraded forests or lands. Rehabilitation by planting a single tree species is a common way to restore exploited forests to maintain ecological processes. We compared woody and herbaceous understory vegetation between forests rehabilitated by mahogany (N = 12) or teak (N = 12) planted from 1941 until 2003 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Understory vegetation of these areas was compared with that of three native forests. Species richness, species diversity, density of plants and proportion of native plants did not differ between the rehabilitated areas and the native forest. Recently rehabilitated areas were different from the native forests while 41–74 yr after rehabilitation, characteristics of understory vegetation approached those of native forest. We described species composition using ordination, and found it to differ between areas rehabilitated with teak and with mahogany and, particularly, between the rehabilitated areas and the native forests. Time since rehabilitation and tree species planted were important for the species composition of understory vegetation. We conclude that the selection of species for rehabilitation and letting rehabilitated areas mature are important for understory development and species diversity.
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