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(searched for: doi:10.1007/s10551-018-3791-8)
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Anastasios Hadjisolomou
Published: 22 August 2022
Abstract:
Purpose: The article challenges the narrow view in scholarship which presents disengagement as passive and simply the absence of condition of engagement and explores how food retail employees articulate their disengagement within the intensified customer-centric service work. The article adopts the term “active disengagement”, as presented by Ackroyd and Thompson (2016) and empirically examines this as a form of oppositional voice towards managerial norms and behavioural expectations.Design/methodology/approach: The article draws on qualitative data from two case study organisations in the Cypriot food retail sector. Forty-six interviews took place with participants across different departments, including front-line employees and front-line and senior managers, to better understand the research problem through different perspectives.Findings: The data show that disengagement is an integral part of organisational life and it is expressed in an individual and less-risky way. The data also reveal a variation in disengagement actions across departments, depending on employees' mobility on the shop floor and the intensity of interaction with the customers and the line manager. Shop floor employees enjoyed a wider “space of disengagement”, in comparison to those working on the front-end/checkouts. Nevertheless, checkout employees have developed sophisticated actions to express disengagement.Research limitations/implications: This research provides a refined understanding of active disengagement in organisations. It empirically contributes to the existence of a spectrum of engagement and expands Ackroyd and Thompson's (2016) “active disengagement” framework, discussing it as a form of oppositional voice towards corporate values and the customer-centric work intensification.Practical implications: The research provides empirical evidence that employee disengagement is not merely the absence of engagement, as HRM scholars and practitioners have argued, but entails further social meanings. This article will be useful for practitioners to rethink, revisit and revise employee engagement programmes in organisations, as well as to re-write corporate values, mission and vision, to also consider employees' experiences within the workplace. This will allow the provision of social support by management to address active disengagement in service organisations.Originality/value: The study provides an important insight in employees' individual actions to express disengagement towards corporate values and managerial expectations related to customer service. It highlights the variation of dynamics across the food retail shop floor, which has been treated as a contextual periphery within the disengagement debate. Applying a broader lens on retail work heterogeneity, it provides further understanding of the diversity of how frontline service workers express disengagement within the triadic employment relationship. This study offers ground for future research to examine active disengagement in various contexts for better conceptual and practical understanding of this behaviour in organisations.
Wenchi Zou, Baowen Lin, Ling Su,
Published: 21 August 2022
Journal of Business Ethics pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-022-05227-6

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Published: 20 May 2022
by MDPI
Journal: Sustainability
Sustainability, Volume 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14106237

Abstract:
Since the empirical evidence on the relationship between corporate social responsibility disclosure (CSRD) and firm productivity is scarce in the context of the banking industry, the study examines whether CSRD leads banks in Bangladesh to higher productivity. Using annual report data of all 30 banks listed on the Dhaka Stock Exchange in Bangladesh from 2011 to 2018, the study applied a data envelopment analysis (DEA) to determine the productivity of the sample banks, and then ordinary least squares (OLS) analysis to examine the impact of CSR on the banks’ productivity. Furthermore, the study utilized two-stage least squares (2SLS) and a generalized method of moments (GMM) to check the robustness of the findings amid the detection of endogeneity issues. The study also used several alternative variables to check and verify the reliability of the study. The findings indicate that the greater a bank’s contribution to CSR, the higher its productivity. However, banks with more debt to assets are less productive. Additionally, the study observed that the impact of CSRD on bank productivity is higher in GRI banks compared to non-GRI banks, non-politically connected banks as opposed to politically connected banks, and conventional banks compared to Islamic banks. The study provides valuable insight into how CSR activities can promote bank productivity, thus motivating the banks to execute a well-thought-out action plan to ensure more CSR contribution. This study is the first ever bank-level evidence that provides insight into how the patterns of CSR activity of publicly traded banks impact their productivity.
Martina Kurki, Merja Lähdesmäki
Published: 6 May 2022
Abstract:
Although present research shows that ambitious corporate sustainability objectives improve employee engagement in business organizations, there is scarcity of research showing how employees engage in corporate sustainability objectives and become autonomous sustainability thinkers. We suggest that a strong, individual level of psychological ownership of corporate sustainability is a precondition for the development of sustainability thinking, and examine the factors that influence the emergence of such feelings of ownership. Our qualitative study, based on 29 interviews conducted in seven Finnish local business units from three different technology-oriented multinational enterprises (MNEs), shows that several key factors can have contradictory effects, both strengthening and hindering the routes to psychological ownership of corporate sustainability. While these contradictory effects may potentially lead to confusion among employees, our findings may help managers to avoid pitfalls in developing a more sustainability-oriented organizational culture. Moreover, by applying the theory of psychological ownership, our study contributes to the business sustainability research by providing new theoretical opportunities to understand the process of how individuals may become engaged in enhancing business sustainability.
, Magnus Söderlund
The International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research, Volume 32, pp 184-200; https://doi.org/10.1080/09593969.2022.2047757

Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to explore a set of mechanisms that mediate the influence of the impact of responsible service employee behaviour on customer satisfaction during the Covid-19 pandemic. A questionnaire was distributed online to UK residents who were instructed to recall and focus on either one very dissatisfying or one very satisfying face-to-face service encounter with an employee during the Covid-19 pandemic. A structural equation modelling approach was used to analyse the associations between the hypothesized response variables. The main finding was that the impact of responsible employee behaviour in service encounters on customer satisfaction was sequentially mediated by perceptions of employee morality and perceived employee humanness. A more parsimonious mediation model comprises only employee morality as a mediator. The attributions of morality to employees are important in a setting in which new social norms guide interpersonal behaviour and in which the violation of such norms can have serious health implications. This study adds empirical evidence to the emerging discourse in the service and retail literature on the implications of the Covid-19 pandemic. It also contributes to the literature on customers’ moral reactions in commercial settings, and to the literature in which perceived humanness is seen as a relevant characteristic of human employees. The results imply that responsible employee behaviour should be encouraged not only from the perspective of the well-being of customers and employees, but also from a business point of view.
Ferman Omar Ismael, Mehmet Yeşiltaş, Simbarashe Rabson Andrea
Published: 4 March 2022
Abstract:
This study examines the impact of corporate social responsibility on organisational citizenship behaviour, work engagement, and job embeddedness. Structural equation modeling tests were conducted on 522 responses gathered from telecommunications companies in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The results depicted that corporate social responsibility improvements have positive effects on organisational citizenship behaviour, work engagement, and job embeddedness. Further observations depicted an insignificant positive partial causal path between corporate social responsibility, work engagement, and organizational citizenship behaviour. This study's novelty elements are inherent in its potency to examine the causal path between corporate social responsibility, work engagement, and organizational citizenship behavior. This study contributes to the literature by further expanding job embeddedness theory and proposing a comprehensive job embeddedness framework that researchers and practitioners can adopt in future research.
Published: 11 February 2022
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Volume 50, pp 214-222; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhtm.2022.02.012

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Isabel Kittyma Disse, Hürrem Becker-Özcamlica
Published: 8 February 2022
Journal of Services Marketing, Volume 36, pp 1095-1105; https://doi.org/10.1108/jsm-05-2021-0156

Abstract:
Purpose: Numerous service organizations involve employees in strengthening customer relationships. While the literature has emphasized the importance of a sustainable market orientation (SMO) for an organization’s image, it has not explored how employees’ behavior in sustainable service organizations influences the reputational effect. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of SMO-aligned employee behavior on customer attitude and behavior, while considering different SMOs and the role of value-based brand choice. Design/methodology/approach: The authors conducted a 2 (SMO-aligned vs nonaligned) × 3 (social, environmental or economic SMOs) between-subject, scenario-based experiment with 313 participants to test the hypotheses. A moderated mediation analysis was also conducted. Findings: The results show that SMO-aligned employee behavior has a positive impact on customers’ trust in contrast with SMO-nonaligned behavior independent of the SMO. The relationship between employee behavior and customer word-of-mouth is mediated by trust. Furthermore, the effect on trust is moderated by value-based brand choice. Originality/value: This study contributes to employee behavior research by examining the impact of SMO-aligned employee behavior on customer outcomes in sustainable service organizations. Adding to previous research on employee behavior, it further considers the impact of value-based brand choice.
Published: 28 November 2021
by MDPI
Journal: Sustainability
Sustainability, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313175

Abstract:
(1) Background: Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a concept, which from its very beginning, has been dividing researchers and practicians into its supporters and opponents. The owners of some organizations can still see in it its great value and implement its premises, among other things, in the human resources management processes. (2) Methods: The aim of the research presented within this article was to define the aspects of CSR in the processes of recruitment and selection of candidates to work in the teal organization and the motifs of implementing the aspects of CSR into these processes. A qualitative research strategy was applied in order to achieve reliable research results, and a single embedded case study was used as a tool of this research. The research information was gathered with the use of the following research methods: interviews, analysis of the documents, and analysis of the audio–visual materials (video recordings). The research was carried out in one of the leading teal companies in Poland, Marco Company Ltd. (3) Results: In the organization being researched, the aspects of the teal organization were identified in ten elements of the job candidates’ recruitment and selection processes. They permeate the entire process of recruitment constituting its inherent feature. The inclusion of CSR aspects into the processes of the job candidates’ recruitment and selection allows the company to gain such candidates who will make up the unique organization culture in cooperation with other Marco Company employees and will also fulfil corporate fundamental vision and mission. (4) Conclusions: The processes realized within the analysed company, including those in the field of job candidates‘ recruitment and selection, are to create a socially responsible and timeless business as the foundation of the welfare of the customers, suppliers, employees, company partners and local society. In order to achieve this purpose, the company needs suitable people, and that is the reason why CSR aspects are already included in the process of job candidates’ recruitment and selection.
, Tony Garry, Juergen Gnoth,
Published: 4 March 2021
Journal of Service Theory and Practice, Volume 31, pp 450-467; https://doi.org/10.1108/jstp-06-2020-0124

Abstract:
Purpose This study aims to provide empirically generated insights into the drivers of guardianship behaviour among frontline service employees (FLEs) within retail settings. Design/methodology/approach The research framework comprises a quantitative survey of 507 frontline service employees at national supermarkets within New Zealand. Findings The findings of the survey suggest that service employee perceptions of internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities, their level of psychological ownership towards the supermarket and personal moral beliefs, shape their guardianship behaviours and, consequentially, the prevention of in-store deviant behaviours by customers such as shoplifting. Originality/value The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, it offers both a conceptual foundation and an empirical-based evaluation of the antecedents and role of guardianship behaviour among frontline service employees. Second, the conceptual model derived from this research may aid practitioners in developing strategies that engender guardianship behaviours in their employees within service contexts.
Published: 28 December 2020
Frontiers of Business Research in China, Volume 14, pp 1-22; https://doi.org/10.1186/s11782-020-00096-0

Abstract:
This study focuses on the use of we-media by small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to disclose internal corporate social responsibility (ICSR) under the impact of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Study 1 interprets the catalyst effect of COVID-19 on the externalization of SMEs’ ICSR. The fuzzy grading evaluation method is initially verified. Under the impact of COVID-19, SMEs fulfilling their ICSR can enhance consumer brand attitudes. Study 2 uses a structural equation model and empirical analysis of 946 effective samples and finds that consumers perceive the self-sacrifice of corporations during the coronavirus disease period. SMEs can fulfill their ICSR to enhance the internal explanation mechanism of consumer brand attitudes and the moderating role of enterprise losses.
Verena Girschik, , Evgenia I Lysova
Published: 3 November 2020
Journal: Human Relations
Human Relations, Volume 75, pp 3-32; https://doi.org/10.1177/0018726720970275

Abstract:
In their recent essay, Gond and Moser (2019) have proposed that micro-CSR research has the potential to “matter” and transform business practices as it engages closely with how individuals in companies work with and experience corporate social responsibility (CSR). But can micro-CSR research in its current form realize this transformative potential and serve social justice? Adopting an intellectual activist position, we argue that the transformative potential of micro-CSR is severely limited by its predominant focus on CSR as defined, presented, and promoted by companies themselves, thereby serving to sustain the hegemony of the business case for CSR, promoting narrow interests and maintaining managerial control over corporate responsibilities. We propose that micro-CSR researchers broaden the scope of their research to cultivate the potential of alternative ideas, voices, and activities found in organizational life. In so doing we lay out a research agenda that embraces employee activism, listens to alternative voices, and unfolds confrontational, subversive, and covert activities. In the hope of inspiring other micro-CSR researchers to explore these unconventional paths, we also offer suggestions as to how we can pursue them through empirical research.
Published: 18 August 2020
Journal of Business Ethics, Volume 174, pp 355-368; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-020-04586-2

Abstract:
In recent years, scholars have sought to investigate the impact that ethical leaders can have within organisations. Yet, only a few theoretical perspectives have been adopted to explain how ethical leaders influence subordinate outcomes. This study therefore draws on social rules theory (SRT) to extend our understanding of the mechanisms linking ethical leadership to employee attitudes. We argue that ethical leaders reduce disengagement, which in turn promotes higher levels of job satisfaction and organisational commitment, as well as lower turnover intentions. Co-worker social undermining is examined as a moderator of the relationship between ethical leadership and disengagement, as we suggest that it is difficult for ethical leaders to be effective when co-worker undermining prevails. To test the proposed model, questionnaires were administered to 460 nurses in Romanian hospital settings over three time points separated by two-week intervals and the hypotheses were tested using generalised multilevel structural equation modeling (GSEM) with STATA. The findings revealed that ethical leadership has a beneficial effect on employee attitudes by reducing disengagement. However, the relationship between ethical leadership and disengagement was moderated by co-worker social undermining, such that when undermining was higher, the significance of the mediated relationships disappeared. These results suggest that while ethical leaders can promote positive employee attitudes, their effectiveness is reduced in situations where co-worker undermining exists.
Sustainability Management Forum | NachhaltigkeitsManagementForum, Volume 28, pp 93-107; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00550-020-00505-1

Abstract:
There is a dynamic stream of research, which examines why and how employees contribute and respond to corporate social responsibility (CSR). Building on these micro-CSR findings, this article makes a contribution to a better understanding of employee engagement in CSR by considering its determinants and effects. The research centres around the established motivational concept of psychological empowerment in the workplace and applies it to sustainability. The authors propose a model of sustainability empowerment in the workplace (SEW) and empirically test the construct in a comprehensive framework. Results indicate that the sustainability-orientation of employees and the perceived organisational support towards sustainability act as two valid determinants of SEW. It is also shown that SEW has positive effects on job satisfaction and organisational commitment. Further results indicate that the sustainability-orientation of employees plays an important role as a moderator in the relationship between SEW and its effects. In the overall view, the paper contributes to micro-CSR research by showing that SEW is a valid construct that helps to answer why and how employees engage in CSR activities and what positive effects arise therefrom for organisations. The authors give an overview of these contributions and discuss the implications for researchers and practitioners in the field of CSR and HRM.
Yinfeng Liang, , Yangchen Huang
Published: 15 July 2020
Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Volume 58, pp 3589-3607; https://doi.org/10.1080/1540496x.2020.1788537

Abstract:
The recent promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) by China has coincided with a marked increase in the number of its listed firms. To what extent can the disclosure of CSR reports benefit corporate productivity? This article empirically explores the impact of CSR on firm-level Total Factor Productivity (TFP) as well as the possible influence approaches and mechanisms. Following previous literature, several predictive models are built to draw the following conclusions: (1) CSR significantly promotes TFP; (2) the impact of CSR on TFP of family firms is greater than that of non-family firms; (3) CSR has a larger positive impact on firms releasing CSR reports voluntarily than on those releasing under compulsion; (4) CSR has a greater impact on private firms than on state-owned ones, while it has little effect on foreign-funded ones; (5) The impact of CSR on TFP is robust in high-tech firms, non-high-tech firms, coastal firms, non-coastal firms, industrial firms, and service firms. Besides, this article finds that financing constraints operate as a major channel for CSR to affect TFP, while firms’ irregularity acts only as an important channel. Additionally, 2SLS method is employed to deal with possible endogenous problems, finding that our conclusions remain robust.
Management & Marketing. Challenges for the Knowledge Society, Volume 15, pp 302-325; https://doi.org/10.2478/mmcks-2020-0018

Abstract:
Over the past decade, the number of studies investigating corporate social responsibility (CSR), its drivers and benefits has been growing. However, several gaps still remain. Previous research mostly investigated customer perceptions of CSR, leaving the employee perceptions in the sidelines and accordingly neglecting the employee importance. Furthermore, although acknowledging that employee perception of CSR is beneficial for the organisation, most of the previous studies have focused on employee attitudes as a desirable outcome forgetting about the employee behaviour, including organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB), which can be a source of competitive advantage. Moreover, although values have been recognised as key determinants of human attitudes and behaviour, it seems that the potential of values, including the universalism values, for driving the employee perception of CSR and OCB has not been revealed. Trying to close the gap, the paper aims at revealing the relationship between the employee perceptions of CSR, employee OCB and universalism values. In doing this, quantitative data were collected (301 responses in total). Consistent with the expectations, the survey indicated that employee perceptions of CSR directed at four main stakeholder groups, namely employees, customers, government, and social and non-social stakeholders had a positive effect on OCB. As it was expected, universalism values drive both the employee perception of CSR and employee OCB. Moreover, the findings support the idea that the employee perception of CSR partly mediates the relationship between the universalism values and OCB. Generally, the obtained results highlight the necessity for organisations to invest not only in CSR, but also in employee perceptions of CSR, as this could drive extra-role employee behaviour, namely OCB.
, Mark Pagell, Anthony Veltri,
Published: 3 January 2020
Journal of Safety Research, Volume 72, pp 75-91; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsr.2019.11.004

Abstract:
Introduction: Safe production is a sustainable approach to managing an organization’s operations that considers the interests of both management and workers as salient stakeholders in a productive and safe workplace. A supportive culture enacts values versus only espousing them. These values-in-action are beliefs shared by both management and workers that align what should happen in performing organizational routines to be safe and be productive with what actually is done. However, the operations and safety management literature provides little guidance on which values-in-action are most important to safe production and how they work together to create a supportive culture. Method: The researchers conducted exploratory case studies in 10 manufacturing plants of 9 firms. The researchers compared plant managers’ top-down perspectives on safety in the performance of work and workers’ bottom-up experiences of the safety climate and their rates of injury on the job. Each case study used data collected from interviewing multiple managers, the administration of a climate survey to workers and the examination of the plant’s injury rates over time as reported to its third party health and safety insurer. Results: The researchers found that plants with four values-in-action —a commitment to safety, discipline, prevention and participation—were capable of safe production, while plants without those values were neither safe nor productive. Where culture and climate aligned lower rates of injury were experienced. Discussion and conclusion: The four value-in-actions must all be present and work together in a self-reinforcing manner to engage workers and managers in achieving safe production. Practical application: Managers of both operations and safety functions do impact safety outcomes such as reducing injuries by creating a participatory environment that encourage learning that improves both safety and production routines.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, Volume 31, pp 2376-2393; https://doi.org/10.1108/ijchm-06-2018-0451

Abstract:
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues in the context of the hospitality industry and offer some avenues for future research. Design/methodology/approach The paper reviews several domains of CSR and takes stock of some exemplar research from hospitality management pertaining to each domain. Particular note is taken of research that explores CSR issues outside the Western world. Several unanswered questions are then noted along with suggestions for future research. Findings Based on prior literature, four CSR domains were identified as instrumental, social/legal/political, ethical and environmental. CSR issues in hospitality research have predominantly focused on the instrumental domain while there is scant research on other domains. CSR adoption in the multinational context was identified as due from stakeholder pressures, competitive environment and cultural environment. Research limitations/implications The paper identifies some unanswered questions in transnational operations of hospitality firms and suggests avenues for future research. Practical implications The paper recommends that due attention must be given to contextual issues in the conceptualization, focus and practice of CSR by multinational hospitality firms. Originality/value The paper offers a review of hospitality research on various CSR domains. It offers some unanswered research questions that may spur future research, discussion and debates among academics, students and executives.
Published: 16 May 2019
Journal of Business Ethics, Volume 167, pp 361-378; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-019-04174-z

Abstract:
Most studies of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have focused on the organisational level, while the individual level of analysis has been treated as a ‘black box’ when researching antecedents of CSR engagement or disengagement. This article offers insights into a small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) that is recognised as a pioneer in CSR. Although the extant literature suggests that the owner-manager is crucial in the implementation of CSR, this study reveals that employees drive CSR. The employees in the focal firm voluntarily joined forces based on their shared perception of moral responsibility for CSR and they developed strict targets to be achieved by 2030. Despite their strong ethical and moral perspective when enacting CSR, they disengaged from their moral responsibility for CSR in various contexts. This paper contributes to the theory of moral decoupling by uncovering a novel context of disengagement—‘visionary procrastination’. Visionary procrastination is suggested to be a particularly relevant context of disengagement when individuals perceive moral responsibility for CSR. Moreover, by delivering insights into the antecedents of employee-initiated CSR on the organisational level, this study adds to the growing body of literature on the micro-foundations of CSR.
François Maon, Joëlle Vanhamme, Kenneth De Roeck, Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen
Published: 29 April 2019
International Journal of Management Reviews, Volume 21, pp 209-230; https://doi.org/10.1111/ijmr.12198

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Yang Yang, Lujie Chen, , Zhiduan Xu
International Journal of Production Research, Volume 57, pp 6369-6384; https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2019.1566664

Abstract:
In recent years, circular economy (CE) is receiving increasing attention worldwide and is intended to integrate economic activity and environmental wellbeing in a sustainable way. The CE mainly focuses on both the front (eco-design, ECO) and back ends (reverse activities, RA) of operations and production at the firm level. However, what is missing in the literature are the synergistic effects between the two practices on corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance. Drawing on systems theory, this paper used panel data of Chinese manufacturing firms over the period from 2013 to 2015 that was collected from Chinese Research Data Services Platform (CNRDS) and Rankins CSR Ratings (RKS) databases and performed a series of regression tests to see whether complementarity exists between them and their effects on CSR performance. The results show significant complementarity between ECO and RA in improving CSR performance. Furthermore, building on systems theory, three kinds of enablers are identified as essential for promoting the interaction of subsystems and the complementarity of ECO and RA, including CSR vision as an internal enabler within the system, an environmental management system as a system regulation, and supply chain cooperation as an external enabler from the environment.
Published: 20 December 2018
Journal of Business Ethics, Volume 165, pp 453-467; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-018-4093-x

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