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Emily Alford
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 18-20; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7603

Abstract:
In recent years, the opioid crisis across the United States has influenced the research of many professional fields. Widely known as a first stop information source for analysts and professionals in the medical and public health worlds, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) gathers and presents extensive data on prescription rates and overdose numbers to the public. However, the opioid crisis is a collective matter. It holds cause and effect economically, environmentally, and socially. This article explores resources developed by federal departments outside of HHS, which provide useful data and information relevant to their fields on such impacts. Departments such as Agriculture, Education, Labor, Housing and Urban Development—even the General Services Administration—make available statistics both the public and researchers can access to learn more about the effects of this crisis.
Lynda Kellam
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 4-4; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7599

Abstract:
I hope you are all enjoying the warming weather (or at least making the best of it). By the time this issue is published, I imagine that I will have spent several days sitting on my porch or hanging out at a gorge. I can’t wait. I also hope by the time you are reading this that most, if not everyone, has been able to get vaccinated.During the past year, in addition to efforts to grow our membership, the leadership of GODORT has endeavored to retain a sense of community through a difficult time. Our Friday chats have been successful with a wide range of topics from government documents in the news to a discussion of the Mapping Prejudice Project. While we may not be able to sustain the pace of the chats indefinitely, I hope we can continue to come together informally in between conferences.
Valerie D. Glenn, Laurie Aycock
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 7-10; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7601

Abstract:
Through the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP), the Government Publishing Office (GPO) provides materials published by government agencies to designated libraries in the United States and its territories. In return, these libraries offer free, public access to the materials in their depository collections. The state of Georgia has 23 federal depository libraries—one Regional and 22 Selectives. All but two of these libraries are affiliated with academic institutions, and the majority are part of the University System of Georgia (USG).
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 2-3; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7598

Abstract:
Last year I published an editorial about voting during the pandemic, contrasting states trying to make voting more accessible, with states that were fighting efforts to enable ways citizens could vote safely. Unfortunately greater voting access is under more attack now. The Brennan Center for Justice noted as of March 24th, “361 bills with restrictive provisions in 47 states. That’s 108 more than the 253 restrictive bills tallied as of February 19, 2021—a 43 percent increase in little more than a month.” This is very disappointing, and once again my home state of Texas is restricting access, trying to ban methods of voting that local officials allowed during the pandemic in last year’s general election. The Texas Senate recently passed Senate Bill 7, which would limit extended early voting hours, prohibit drive-thru voting, and make it illegal for local election officials to proactively send applications to vote by mail. Here’s hoping the Texas House will stand up to the Texas Senate and not restrict the ways citizens of Texas can vote. I think it also demonstrates that the U.S. Supreme Court was premature in its 2013 Shelby County v. Holder ruling removing the requirement that states with a history of racial discrimination in voting get pre-clearance from the Justice Department before making changes in voting procedures. With so many states trying to restrict voting, and limit the powers of election officials, the U.S House has passed H.R. 1, For the People Act of 2021, in early March. This bill addresses voter access, election integrity and security, and more. Hopefully this will pass the U.S. Senate and allow the citizens of the United States the right to vote without undue burdens.
Carl P. Olson
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 5-6; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7600

Abstract:
This report is one of the first of a series on the gray zone, a “carrier concept” for hostile action, preceded by a long game of diplomacy, threats, and propaganda to achieve warlike aims without full-scale warfare. It owes a good deal to the British Royal Army’s General Rupert Smith, author of a 2005 best-seller, The Utility of Force: The Art of War in the Modern World.
Paul Riermaier, Williams Bandoma, Sue Gagnon, Janet Marler, Sandra Standish, Victoria Turner
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 11-17; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7602

Abstract:
Weeding is a systematic approach to the removal of resources from a library’s collection. In the weeding process, materials are identified for withdrawal in order to maintain a collection that is accurate, updated, well-used, meets the needs of the users, and is in line with the library’s mission. When weeding tangible resources that are part of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP), a depository library must ensure that its weeding policy follows the Legal Requirements & Program Regulations of the Federal Depository Library Program and any separate guidelines set by the Regional Depository. However, there are no specific rules or guidelines to follow when weeding digital FDLP resources. This means that individual libraries have more leeway to craft digital weeding procedures that best serve their institution, patrons, and the community at large. In this article, we will discuss initial considerations when developing a process for weeding digital depository materials, we will examine different methods for analyzing a digital collection’s size and usage, and we will review methods for maintenance and weeding of digital resources.
Eric Stroshane
Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy, Volume 6, pp 6-13; https://doi.org/10.5860/jifp.v6i1.7593

Abstract:
SchoolsColleges and UniversitiesNationwidePrisons
Eric Stroshane
Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy, Volume 6, pp 3-5; https://doi.org/10.5860/jifp.v6i1.7592

Abstract:
PrisonsBookstoresColleges and UniversitiesInternational
Eric Stroshane
Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy, Volume 6, pp 17-18; https://doi.org/10.5860/jifp.v6i1.7595

Abstract:
Colleges and UniversitiesDiscriminationFirst Amendment
Eric Stroshane
Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy, Volume 6, pp 19-21; https://doi.org/10.5860/jifp.v6i1.7596

College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.6.288

Abstract:
Fact checkingStreaming musicRemedial postsecondary educationUndergraduate enrollmentGlobal Internet usersStranded college credits
Shelby Deglan, Anthea Leung
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 25-27; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.25

Abstract:
This list features freely accessible links to research and resources on social-emotional learning (SEL) in early childhood. The resources can help children’s librarians and early childhood practitioners expand their knowledge and equip them with practical skills to promote SEL practices at libraries and/or other childcare settings.
Melody Leung, Marika Jeffery
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 28-30; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.28

Abstract:
As our name suggests, the Library Service to Underserved Children and Their Caregivers (LSUCTC) committee seeks to help library staff better serve children and families who are often marginalized and overlooked by traditional library programs and services. A significant part of our committee’s work is focused on developing toolkits that provide resources and ideas for assisting a variety of these overlooked demographics, and we encourage readers to visit our toolkits here: tinyurl.com/lsuctctoolkit.
Nicole Rawlinson
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 35-36; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.35

Abstract:
The Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) within ALSC Implementation task force exists to heighten visibility, increase opportunities, and eliminate challenges to participation within ALSC for BIPOC library workers.The task force supports ALSC’s charge to implement EDI practices while diversifying membership and future leadership. It aims to mitigate the impacts to participation associated with costs, perceived accessibility, and lack of diversity, while developing pathways to ALSC membership and leadership opportunities. Through the task force’s work, one of the main initiatives to increase BIPOC representation within the organization was realized through the development of the Equity Fellows program.
Sharon Verbeten
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 2-2; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.2

Abstract:
In February 2020, I was already planning the summer wall display in our children’s library room—I was planning on having a large pair of glasses with “20/20 Vision!” You know, perfect vision looking ahead to what a great year it would be!
Sarah Barriage, Vanessa Kitzie, Diana Floegel, Shannon M. Oltmann
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 14-22; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.14

Abstract:
Since their first appearances in public libraries, drag queen storytimes (DQS) have frequently been featured in news stories and professional literature. These events feature drag performers leading various aspects of otherwise typical storytimes, including reading books, singing songs, and leading crafts and other activities with young children and their families.
Katie Cerqua, Uma Nori, Kristin Williamson
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 38-39; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.38

Abstract:
As libraries closed physical doors to protect the families we serve, collaborations and partnerships to meet the needs of children and families took on an even greater importance.Libraries scrambled to ramp up virtual programming, grew digital collections and resources, and built outdoor story walks, all while facing the very real concern that many families continue to lack access to these important services. The ongoing lack of equitable access, further exacerbated by the pandemic, left staff with the need to do what we do best—get creative.
Matthew Boulay, Elizabeth McChesney
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 3-5; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.3

Abstract:
Summer 2021 will likely look much different than previous summers due to the impact of the now more than one-year-long pandemic.Here we share research about summer learning loss and overlap that with emerging studies illustrating how COVID-19 closures and remote learning have compounded learning loss, all of which disproportionately impacts Black children, indigenous children, children of color, and all children who live in poverty.
Jackie Cassidy
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 31-32; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.31

Abstract:
While your library may have done take-and-make programming in the past, the term has gained expanded meaning during the pandemic. Now many libraries have adopted take-and-makes as a staple of pandemic programming, bringing joy and creativity to families and librarians.
Robin A. Moeller, Kim E. Becnel
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 6-13; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.6

Abstract:
Booklists created by library and education professionals can be valuable tools for librarians as they develop collections. Based upon the perceived discomfort felt by many school librarians in selecting graphic novels, this research analyzes the extent to which a population of elementary and middle school libraries’ collections in the Southeastern United States reflects the lists of recommended graphic novels annually produced by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC).
Elissa Hozore, Betsy Diamant-Cohen
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 23-24; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.23

Abstract:
Computers are a fact of life in the twenty-first century. Reading and math literacy have long been considered essential, and technological literacy is emerging as equally important to children’s (and adults’) ability to understand and engage with their world. However, just as it is crucial to learn to write as well as to read, it is crucial that children engage as programmers, as creators, and not only as consumers, of technology.
Kimberly Grad
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 33-34; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.33

Abstract:
Programming for school age children has experienced a radical shift in the last year due to the pandemic. Out-of-school time or “after school” has taken on a different tone as some children learn at home and some are back at school.And yet, with virtual programming libraries continue to provide a bridge between home and school. Children’s librarians are digging deeper into the well of programming ideas to provide engaging library related activities. In our first column, we offer some concrete program ideas that can be utilized throughout the year when school is in session or during summer reading programming.
Allison Knight
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 37-37; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.37

Abstract:
Michelle Ng, Youth Services Librarian, San Mateo (CA) County LibrariesRebecca Ballard, Children’s Librarian, Oconee County (GA) Library
Samantha Blanquart
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 40-40; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.2.40

Abstract:
When we think of storytime, we think of sharing a love of books with children, having a good time, and modeling early literacy behaviors for caregivers. We share early literacy tips and demonstrate activities, but we also display early literacy posters on the walls of the storytime rooms.
Maggie Halterman-Dess
Library Resources & Technical Services, Volume 65, pp 78-78; https://doi.org/10.5860/lrts.65n2.78-78

Abstract:
The Sudden Selector’s Guide to Philosophy Resources, the ninth volume in its series, is a succinct introduction for the library professionals newly responsible for collection management and research assistance for the discipline. Its six chapters provide a broad overview of academic philosophy, issues of audience, common formats, flagship resources, and the financial aspects of effectively managing a philosophy collection.
Mary Beth Weber
Library Resources & Technical Services, Volume 65, pp 34-35; https://doi.org/10.5860/lrts.65n2.34-35

Abstract:
This past week marked the one-year anniversary of my staff and me working from home. When we packed up our cubicles and offices in March 2020, no one expected to be working remotely from home for long. We honestly expected to return in a few weeks or at least by the end of April. In the meantime, the university kept extending our work-from-home agreements. During the past year, we have acquired new skills and ways of working. For example, we have mastered how to use WebEx and Zoom for meetings and have realized that this technology can make our meetings more effective. Although some people complain of Zoom fatigue, we have found that our meetings are shorter, and no one lingers afterward. We may start meetings with small talk, but when we are done, people are ready to sign off. Participants who may have difficulty speaking up can choose to use the chat box, and entering terms like “stack” in the chat box helps to ensure that everyone gets a chance to speak and in a predetermined order. It avoids having everyone try to speak at once and ensures all have a chance to speak.
Audra M. Deemer
Library Resources & Technical Services, Volume 65, pp 76-77; https://doi.org/10.5860/lrts.65n2.76-77

Abstract:
The third in the ALCTS Sudden Position Series tackles acquisitions and promises an easy-to-read introduction to the responsibilities covering “essential knowledge, tools of the trade, and best practices” (ix). At a slim eighty-six pages, someone “suddenly” in acquisitions, or those preparing to interview or start a new position, will still find a lot of ground covered.
Colin Bitter, Yuji Tosaka
Library Resources & Technical Services, Volume 65, pp 52-64; https://doi.org/10.5860/lrts.65n2.52-64

Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to report on a quantitative analysis of the LCGFT vocabulary within a large set of MARC bibliographic data retrieved from the OCLC WorldCat database. The study aimed to provide a detailed analysis of the outcomes of the LCGFT project, which was launched by the Library of Congress (LC) in 2007. Findings point to a moderate increase in LCGFT use over time; however, the vocabulary has not been applied to the fullest extent possible in WorldCat. Further, adoption has been inconsistent between the various LCGFT disciplines. These and other findings discussed here suggest that retrospective application of the vocabulary using automated means should be investigated by catalogers and other technical services librarians. Indeed, as the data used for the analysis show somewhat uneven application of LCGFT, and with nearly half a billion records in WorldCat, it remains a certainty that much of LCGFT’s full potentials for genre/form access and retrieval will remain untapped until innovative solutions are introduced to further increase overall vocabulary usage in bibliographic databases.
Thomas H. Teper, Vera S. Kuipers
Library Resources & Technical Services, Volume 65, pp 36-51; https://doi.org/10.5860/lrts.65n2.36-51

Abstract:
Librarians and administrators speculate that the digitization and access of items through the HathiTrust Digital Library may reduce or eliminate demand for the corresponding print content. This belief feeds into a perception that monographs housed in academic libraries and delivered via such services are ripe for deduplication or outright withdrawal, yet other institutions may remain dependent upon those holding titles to provide print-based access for their patrons. Embracing HathiTrust’s emerging Shared Print Monograph Program, more than seventy-nine member institutions committed to retain print monographs that correspond to those digitized from their collections. Putting aside concerns expressed by some about the meaningfulness of those commitments, not all members made such commitments. Moreover, retention commitments are not always publicly displayed, leading to scenarios in which such commitments may be used by other institutions to withdraw from their collections, based on these holdings. This paper provides a data-driven examination of the use of one research library’s print items that correspond to the digital materials deposited into the HathiTrust, detailing both the results and the process by which data was gathered, managed, and digested to yield the results.
Tamara Bozich
Library Resources & Technical Services, Volume 65, pp 77-77; https://doi.org/10.5860/lrts.65n2.77-77

Abstract:
As stated in the foreword, “The ongoing purpose of the sudden selector’s series is to provide current information on selection in specific subject areas in order to assist selectors in creating a manageable process in unfamiliar subject territories” (vii). This new entry in the series does just that; it provides new geography and geographic information systems (GIS) selectors with a baseline knowledge of the field. It accomplishes this by introducing the subject and a broad review of valuable tools and resources.
Laura M. Gentry
Library Resources & Technical Services, Volume 65, pp 65-75; https://doi.org/10.5860/lrts.65n2.65-75

Abstract:
This case study explores how one team tasked with the creation of digital collections at The University of Alabama Libraries succeeded at telework to carry on its essential functions despite not being able to digitize new content from March through July 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. Managers of similar units will gain strategies to create similar telework projects at their institution and lessons learned while working and supervising employees remotely.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.242

Abstract:
AllsidesMargaret Herrick Library Digital CollectionNational Eating Disorders Association
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.241

Abstract:
Gains for higher education included in American Rescue Plan ActOne of the largest spending bills ever approved by Congress—the $1.9 trillion-dollar American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA)—includes unprecedented levels of direct and indirect funding for libraries, including for academic and research libraries.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.210

Abstract:
The Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education was adopted by the ACRL Board in 2016. Many librarians, particularly those interested in critical librarianship and critical information literacy, were disappointed that social justice did not explicitly appear anywhere in the Framework. To be fair, multiple elements of the Information has Value frame describe social justice work, specifically the Knowledge Practice: “understand how and why some individuals or groups of individuals may be underrepresented or systematically marginalized within the systems that produce and disseminate information.”
Valerie J. Hill,
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.219

Abstract:
A recent book, Metamodernism and Changing Literacy, by Valerie J. Hill focuses on the intersection of the current philosophical moment by exploring the concept of metamodernism through the lens of metaliteracy. As argued in the book, “Only through metaliteracy can we become digital citizens who seek to acquire, produce and share knowledge in metamodern culture.” In Notes on Metamodernism, Timotheus Vermeulen and Robin van den Akker coin the term metamodernism and argue that it is a discourse based on “recent developments in architecture, art, and film” that oscillates “between a modern enthusiasm and a postmodern irony.” The Notes on Metamodernism webzine features essays on metamodern art and architecture, music and fashion, film and TV, as well as networked culture and politics.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.225

Abstract:
In the days before the pandemic, when I attended and introduced myself as the grants and awards librarian from the University of Victoria (UVic) Libraries at professional events and conferences, my title often evoked quizzical looks. Even now as this unprecedented time continues, as far as I know, I am still the only librarian with this professional designation in Canada, perhaps in all of North America—maybe even the world. Since 2012, I’ve helped UVic Libraries to attract and retain funding, collaborators, allies, and donors, while raising our research profile and demonstrating the value of the 21st-century academic library to university administrators.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.206

Abstract:
MSU Library awards faculty OER grantsLYRASIS, Columbia University Libraries announce e-books partnershipSpringer Nature, UC-Berkeley Library sign new open access book partnershipASERL, DOAJ forge new partnershipLexisNexis introduces Nexis Data LabSpringshare announces new LibCal mapping featuresEx Libris, DataCite launch new integration features
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.244

Abstract:
Distance educationDigestible newsBook publishing industry 2020Top education appsHandwriting helps learning
Samantha Peter, Kristina Clement, Shannon Sheridan, Hilary Baribeau
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.214

Abstract:
In fall 2019, the University of Wyoming (UW) Libraries launched an information and digital literacy badge and certificate program in partnership with the Ellbogen Center for Teaching and Learning (ECTL), housed in the UW Libraries main branch. ECTL crafts programing and provides support for graduate students, staff, and faculty who teach on our campus by employing instructional designers.The Information and Digital Badge and Certificate Program was created when ECTL redesigned their Teaching and Learning Certificate, and it features many services and resources that UW Libraries already offers (i.e., information literacy instruction and research consultations). This article will detail the redesign of the certificate program, how the current teaching and learning certificate was designed, and conclude with lessons learned from the first year of the program as well as future goals.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.233

Abstract:
Much the same as many other academic libraries, the University of South Florida (USF) developed scholarly communication and copyright services in response to community demand and to fulfill perceived institutional needs. The services initially established connections through liaison librarians and referral, when faculty patrons intuitively approached the library with a query. Growth of the services was slow. A new method of outreach for copyright and scholarly communication services was needed. The DSS Roadshow, named after the library department Digital Scholarship Services, aimed at providing a menu of modularly configured presentations to faculty and graduate students at the university. Based on two different tracks, scholarly communication or copyright for instruction, the DSS Roadshow was designed to help deliver the services directly to departments around campus.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.205

Abstract:
Welcome to the May 2021 issue of C&RL News. We open this month’s issue with latest installment of our Perspectives on the Framework column. Christopher Sweet of Illinois Wesleyan University advocates for increasing the focus on social justice in the Framework for Information Literacy in his article “Overdue.”
Wendi Kaspar
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.239

Abstract:
Doing these Spotlights is actually one of the more pleasant aspects of my role as C&RL editor. It is a time to reflect on the works that authors have done and discuss common threads of trending topics. This particular issue is full of a number of compelling articles, so it was actually a little difficult to select a direction to riff on.That said, there are actually two articles that address anxiety, and given that the past year has been nothing but anxiety-inducing, it seems natural to focus on that. In addition, one of most viewed articles in C&RL (it has consistently been in the top three most viewed articles) is “Shame: The Emotional Basis of Library Anxiety” by Erin L. McAfee, which tells me that there is definitely a lot of interest in the topic.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.223

Abstract:
It’s that time of the year again. You know, that time when we are chasing down our IPEDS/ACRL numbers for the dreaded annual reports. Even with some helpful changes over the past few years, I continue to have questions about the value of at least some of the information we are all asked to provide. Some important trends can be clearly tracked. Circulation of print/physical materials has been declining steadily overall and continues to do so. Why? Ask a roomful of librarians and you will undoubtedly get many different explanations, and the reasons are a combination of many of those. Expenditures on those print/physical items is also declining in many academic libraries.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.237

Abstract:
No one imagines starting a new leadership role, or any role, in the middle of a pandemic. In the summer of 2020, we found ourselves doing exactly that: moving to new states and starting new leadership roles during COVID-19. Starting new leadership roles can be challenging during regular times, but the pandemic added another layer of complexity. Along with worries about moving, housing, and other logistical hurdles, the main questions on our minds were related to leadership. In the spirit of Amanda Clay Power, Martin Garnar, and Dustin Fife’s ACRL articles on leadership and book, we opted to interview each other regarding our experiences.
Sarah Kortemeier
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 82; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.82.5.228

Abstract:
Small libraries frequently face significant challenges related to funding and staff capacity when attempting to complete large projects and improve infrastructure. With careful planning and a bit of luck, however, it is possible to leverage small successes into much larger accomplishments. The University of Arizona Poetry Center, a special collections library of contemporary poetry within the College of Humanities at the University of Arizona, recently adopted this approach to implement a systematic overhaul of its preservation program.
Noah Lenstra, Heidi Whelan, Jenn Carson, Kelly Senser, Michelle Bennett-Copeland, Christy Dyson, Danielle Fortin, Barbara Scott, Catherine Jellison
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 3-9; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.1.3

Abstract:
When the pandemic shut down many libraries in spring 2020, children’s librarians had to be creative to fill the void when most in-person programming stopped. In this collection of articles, librarians used everything from outside activities (like storywalks) to motion and movement programs to engage children. See how they helped students move, play, and read!—Editor
Sharon Verbeten
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 2-2; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.1.2

Abstract:
I f there’s one phrase that sticks out for me about the pandemic, it’s “the new normal.” What exactly is that? Is it trying to come to terms with the way our lives have changed over the last year—for better or worse? Or, as it more likely should be, redefining what normal should be.
Association For Library Service to Children
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 40-40; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.1.40

Abstract:
Elizabeth (Liz) McChesney is the 2021 recipient of ALSC’s Distinguished Service Award, which honors an individual who has made significant contributions to library service to children and to ALSC.
Sylvia Vardell, Janet Wong
Children and Libraries, Volume 19, pp 27-28; https://doi.org/10.5860/cal.19.1.27

Abstract:
The lockdown last spring shut down everything—our daily routines, our travel plans, in-person conferences, and—for many people—even our usual reading habits. It was difficult to concentrate. We were all hungry for news and guidance, yet we could hardly grasp it. Authors and illustrators began reading their books out loud and sharing those recordings online; publishers widened their permission rules to allow this sharing of content and images.
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