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Minna Pikkarainen, Mari Ervasti, Pia Hurmelinna-Laukkanen, Satu Nätti
Technology Innovation Management Review, Volume 7, pp 30-43; https://doi.org/10.22215/timreview/1104

Gísli Pálsson, Oscar Aldred
Epoiesen: A Journal for Creative Engagement in History and Archaeology, Volume 2017; https://doi.org/10.22215/epoiesen/2017.1

Sarah Bond
Epoiesen: A Journal for Creative Engagement in History and Archaeology, Volume 2017; https://doi.org/10.22215/epoiesen/2017.3

Abstract:
A journal for exploring creative engagement with the past, especially through digital means. It publishes primarily what might be thought of as ‘paradata’ or artist’s statements that accompany playful and unfamiliar forms of singing the past into existence.
Zena Kamash, Heba Abd El Gawad, Peter Banks Banks, Antonia Bell, Felix Charteris, Sarah Ekdawi, Zoe Glen, Jayne Howe, Arthur Laidlaw, Muna Mitchell, et al.
Epoiesen: A Journal for Creative Engagement in History and Archaeology, Volume 2017; https://doi.org/10.22215/epoiesen/2017.9

Abstract:
A journal for exploring creative engagement with the past, especially through digital means. It publishes primarily what might be thought of as ‘paradata’ or artist’s statements that accompany playful and unfamiliar forms of singing the past into existence.
François Dominic Laramée, Université De Montréal
Epoiesen: A Journal for Creative Engagement in History and Archaeology, Volume 2017; https://doi.org/10.22215/epoiesen/2017.8

, American Numismatic Society
Epoiesen: A Journal for Creative Engagement in History and Archaeology, Volume 2017; https://doi.org/10.22215/epoiesen/2017.6

Scott Piroth
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 7, pp 19-31; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v7i0.312

Abstract:
In this article, I discuss what American students think about Canada before and after taking a Canadian Studies course. I reflect on what I am trying to convey when I teach Canadian Studies courses regarding how Canada differs from the United States and why it is important for Americans to study Canada. The article reports results from a survey of students who have taken Introduction to Canadian Studies in past semesters. These results are discussed in the broader contexts of what American students think about Canada and how taking the course influences these views.
Charmaine Crawford, Karen Flynn, Amoaba Gooden
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.286

Abstract:
Black Canadian artists and scholars challenge racist and nationalist discourses of Canadian nationhood and citizenship that place First Nations people, people of African descent and other people of colour who are born in Canada and can claim Canadian nationality based on birth, as outsiders. By contesting the 'master narrative' of Canadian nationhood and by interrogating blackness within Canada, these artists and scholars claim "African Canada" as a convergence of multiple African diasporic voices, coming from different ethno, cultural, linguistic and national spaces, but together articulating a deliberately transgressive Canadianness.
Zagros Madjd-Sadjadi
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v1i1.305

Abstract:
Comparing Outcomes: Apprenticeship in Canada, theUnited States, and Australia
Joseph A. McKinney
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v2i1.267

Abstract:
The energy industries of the United States and Canada are highly interdependent in a number of ways. The nature and extent of these interdependencies are described by sector in this paper. These energy interdependencies have developed because of economic forces and policy decisions. For many years, both the United States and Canada imposed extensive regulations on their industry industries. As these regulations were gradually removed, market forces brought about significant integration of the two countries' energy industries. In recent years, institutional developments have fostered an even higher level of interdependencies. The United States-Canada free trade agreement, and its successor North American free trade agreement, reduced trade barriers in energy products and provided policy stability conducive to cross-border energy investments. The North American Energy Working Group of NAFTA and the Security and Prosperity Partnership have provided for enhanced cooperation between Canada and the United States on energy matters.
Robert A. Kelly
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v1i1.303

Abstract:
Acadian Exile in the Georgia: Pelagie and Southern Literature
Taylor Adkins
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v1i1.310

Abstract:
Immured in Cultural Walls: The Difficulties of Language Barriers
Carmen Poole
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.290

Abstract:
The historical experience of blacks in Canada has continued to be one of partial remembrance and recognition set against a highly developed and dominant Anglo portrayal of Canadian history. This partiality has greatly limited the development of identity for Canadian blacks due to general non-recognition of them on the part of the white Canadian majority. Historiographically, the historical presence of blacks in Canada has been constructed as distinctly provisional. This study will illustrate the historical exclusion of black Canadians from the Canadian historical narrative by examining pre-Confederation Canadian black history as it appeared in thirty-two intermediate level (grades 7-10) textbooks authorized for use in Ontario between 1950 and 1985. These textbooks were evaluated based on their coverage of slavery in Canada, the Loyalist migration, the War of 1812, the Rebellions of 1837, and the Underground Railroad. These events are helpful in this assessment because they exist at the intersection of noteworthy events in Canadian history and significant moments in the history of black migration and black contribution to the nation. By uncovering these omissions, this study will also discuss the extent to which "black Canadian-ness" was constructed within these texts as a contradiction in terms. Informed by anti-racist pedagogy concerning the hegemonic effects of curricula on racial identity formation, it will focus on where such exclusions affected the process of identity formation of Canadian blacks and how it contributed to the alienation of black children's sense of belonging to the Canadian nation, curtailing the development of an identifiably black and Canadian identity for indigenous black.
Victoria Campbell
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.289

Abstract:
Between the mid-1930s and the mid-1960s, Emancipation Celebrations in Windsor, Ontario were referred to in the city as "The Greatest Freedom Show on Earth." This article explores debates between Emancipation organizers and Windsor city officials between 1957 and 1968 to demonstrate that distance from the era of slavery did not eradicate the contested nature of Emancipation celebrations as sites of political and social agitation, but resulted in new arguments about the position of African Canadians in the community. As Emancipation Day became increasingly associated with the Freedom Movement across the border, Windsor City Council and the Windsor Police Department began to push against the celebrations, eventually culminating to the celebration's cancellations in 1967 and 1968 in reaction to the Detroit Riot. The responses of Emancipation Day organizers and their supporters to this treatment will demonstrate how African Canadians in Windsor attempted to uncover city officials' claims to race neutrality and attempted to define themselves rather than be defined by others.
John French
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v3i1.277

Abstract:
Book Review: The Hanging of Angelique: The Untold Story of Canadian Slavery and the Burning of Old Montreal, by Afua Cooper. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2007, 349 pp.
Zagros Madjd-Sadjadi
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v2i1.270

Abstract:
Federal states, such as Canada and the United States, face unique problems in implementing international agreements because they require the acceptance by subnational governments of these treaties even when the negotiations (i) do not involve them and (ii) may be impeding the rights of those subnational governments. Ever since the "watertight compartments" decision of Lord Atkin in the 1937 Labour Standards case, provincial autonomy within its sphere of influence has been a primary foci of Canadian jurisprudence. The primacy of provincial legislatures in the respective realms means that international obligations cannot be forced on them without their consent. On the other hand, both the interstate commerce clause of the US Constitution and the federal power to make treaties has been interpreted broadly to prohibit state interference in US government-signed international treaties. Even non-federal states such as the People's Republic of China have had to deal with this problem given the Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong and Macau and the SARs' ability to sign international agreements without PRC involvement. This issue even affects sovereign states such as Jamaica when they are part of a common market superstructure, such as the proposed Caribbean Common Market (CARICOM). This paper examines, using examples drawn from Canada, the United States, Hong Kong, and the Caribbean, the influence subnational governments (and sovereign governments that are part of a common market) have on the viability of international agreements and uses game theory to suggest ways to balance the need to avoid subnational sabotage of such agreements without invoking a national paramountcy argument that could destroy a country's federal structure and create irreparable harm to the rights of subnational governments.
Tamara Mose Brown
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.300

Abstract:
Researchers have shown ethnography to be a communicating tool of a social world under study, thereby educating the reading audience. However, being in the "field" as a researcher who is marked by a race, ethnicity, and nationality presents challenges to the way our participants see the researcher and therefore to the type of data collected about a given social group. Despite this, researchers tend to push this information into the background of their analyses. This paper considers how a Canadian researcher of West Indian background used "West Indianness" in sociological field research as a methodological tool for participant recruitment and the maintenance of insider status while clearly marked as "other" because of national birthplace. This research stems from an ethnography in gentrified Brooklyn, New York from 2004‐2007 with West Indian childcare providers. Results show how the insider/outsider presentaEon of self as a Canadian West Indian accommodated and at times hindered the research process while in the field. This paper explores how ethnographers can incorporate a more nuanced reflexivity of this insider and outsider status and relate it back to the analysis of their work as they re(present) their research.
Robert Bence
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v3i1.276

Abstract:
Book Review: How Ottawa Spends 2009-2010: Economic Upheaval and Political Dysfunction, edited by Allan Maslove, Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2009, 308 pp.
Daniel McNeil
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.287

Abstract:
Robin Winks's The Blacks in Canada (1971) is advertised as the only historical survey that covers all aspects of the Black experience in Canada, from the introductioon of slavery in 1628 to the first wave of Caribbean immigration in the 1950s and 1960s. However, its depiction of African Canadians as inauthentic Blacks and aberrant Canadians has been critiqued by intellectuals such as George Elliott Clarke. This paper draws on material from the Robin Winks archives at Yale University in order to substantiate Clarke's charges against the small-l liberal, American bias of Winks's account. In doing so, it contends that Clarke can be read as one of 'Frantz Fanon's children', i.e. one of the 'honest intellectuals' born circa 1952 (the first publication of Fanon's Peau noire, masques blancs) and 1961 (the original publication of Fanon's ties Damn
James P. Allan, Richard Vengroff
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 6, pp 2-20; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v6i1.313

Abstract:
Since the 1990s, provincial elections in Québec have signaled an incremental change in Québec’s party system. These changes are manifested in increasing voter dealignment and volatility in party support. In this article we find that these trends largely continued in both the election of 2012, which produced a minority government and in the 2014 election that resulted in a majority government. Taking a longer--‐term perspective, we examine changes in public opinion, party identification, electoral volatility, and voting behavior in Québec Provincial elections since 1998. The implications for future government formation and the potential impact on policy are examined.
Babacar Mbaye
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.295

Abstract:
This essay analyzes the various ways in which Queen Macoomeh's Tales from Icebox Land (2007) and selected poems of Mutabaruka represent the conditions of Caribbean immigrants in either Canada, England, and (or) the United States since the 1960s and 70s. The paper attempts to uncover the subversive, diasporic, and postcolonial qualities of pivotal West Indian literature that mainstream journals and scholars have neglected. In an attempt to reveal the intellectual and resistive nature of such literature, I place the two authors' writings in historical contexts which reveal the multifaceted experiences of expatriate West Indian populations who have fought hard for equality, citizenship, admissibility, and cultural space in Canada, England, and (or) the United States since the middle of the twentieth century.
Henry Milner
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 4; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v4i1.281

Abstract:
A number of innovations have been introduced to reduce the democratic deficit. I am particularly concerned about the deficit as reflected in the decline in voting at elections among young citizens, and, more widely, the apparent decline in attentiveness to (and, thus, knowledge of) political life. The result is a large number of political dropouts, a phenomenon that tends to be ignored in the literature on alternate forms of political engagement. In a number of democratic countries, a majority can be characterized as political dropouts. I first portray this situation, drawing on comparative, generational indicators of political participation and knowledge. The main part of the paper looks for ways to address this state of events in the form of innovations that aim to promote participation and improve democratic skills what is being done, and needs to be done.
Anthony Connors Shershin
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v1i1.309

Abstract:
Analysis for Canadian Imports of U.S. Southern StatesAgricultural Symbols
Laurence Etling
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v1i1.311

Abstract:
Electronic Drums: Aboriginal and Native Radio in Canada and the USA
Amoaba Gooden
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.285

Abstract:
In the spring of 2010, a call for papers on constructing blackness in Canada was issued. The intent of the call was to highlight the ways in which scholars, artists and community activists were engaging with the African diaspora in Canada. What emerged from that call was more than what I expected and is remarkably illustrative of the profound ways in which many are seeking to alter how we think about blackness in Canada.
Richard D. Parker
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v2i1.269

Abstract:
This paper discusses the need for undergraduate and graduate business programs to incorporate Canadian Studies as part of the business curriculum in North American colleges and universities, particularly those in the United States. Attention is given to specific reasons Canadian Studies should be included in business curricula as well as guidelines on where Canada fits into specific courses. Final consideration of the paper examines the role of the Laval University Summer Business School in Quebec City as a model for encouraging Canadian Studies among business schools and colleges in the United States.
Colin D. Pearce
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 6, pp 21-47; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v6i1.314

Abstract:
This article seeks to go some way toward shedding light on a certain dimension of Canadian intellectual history, specifically that dimension wherein the changing theoretical approaches to the phenomenon of Canadian political culture is the core subject matter. Canadian political culture will be defined here as that collation of ideas, principles, thoughts and opinions which foster the establishment and continuation of a set of political structures and institutions which are liberal democratic at their foundations. With this as a guiding definition the article examines the “paradigm shifts” in the study of English Canadian political culture that have taken place from the days of “The Makers of Canada,” through the ascendancy of the “Fragment Thesis,” to the more contemporary postmodernism of the “Liberal Order Framework.” The foundational assumption of the article is that debate and discussion about the Canadian experience in such fields as political philosophy, intellectual history, party ideology, constitutional structure, legislative procedure, executive power, judicial authority and local governance will tend to be shaped by the historiographical paradigm which has been most successful in making itself the accepted “orthodoxy” in the academic and intellectual circles of the period.
Melanie Knight
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.293

Abstract:
The Black presence in Canada is most commonly described as a homogeneous foreign presence that emerged during the 1960s. In this paper, I explore how Afro-Caribbean women entrepreneurs in creative industries deploy a counter-discourse against hegemonic racist white discourses of blackness in Canada. The counter-narrative they deploy, that I call For Us by Us discourse, challenges the official national story of Blacks in Canada. Black women rearticulate, through their business activities, a Canadian blackness that is defined by them. This articulation is described in both local, as rooted in Canada and global, Black diaspora, ways. The notion of the Black diaspora allows for great malleability and fluidity of notions of identity and belonging. This powerful political counter-discourse can, however, also be exclusionary when it too homogenizes identity. This counter-discourse, however contested, is made possible through entrepreneurship. Participation in this status of work is very strategic, in that, it allows for the creation of political spaces, aimed at developing community, that are often denied to Blacks.
Howard Cody
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v3i1.273

Abstract:
This article examines the visions of Stephen Harper and Michael Ignatieff. Using two identity models allows for an examination of contemporary Canadian politics and its future. Despite considerable differences in principles and goals and the political competition between the leaders of the Conservative and Liberal Parties, Canada's well-established two-party dynamic continues as it did prior to these leaders arriving on the political scene.
Martha Donkor
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.297

Abstract:
Much of the recent research on immigrant women in Canada has been focused on women from Asia perhaps due to the relatively large number of immigrants who have arrived in Canada in the past two decades from that part of the world. But it is also a fact that a significant minority of immigrants, including women, have come from the African Diaspora and made Canada their home. These African women have influenced and have in turn been influenced by Canadian culture. Yet there is relative dearth of information about them as women and as immigrants. The relative dearth of information about African immigrant women skews our understanding of the Black experience in Canada. This article fills a gap in the literature by examining the dynamics of gender roles and expectations in Ghanaian immigrant families.
Peter Hodgins
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 4; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v4i1.280

Abstract:
This exploratory essay investigates the fruitfulness of thinking about the intersection of fears of contagion and the construction of national cultural boundaries in relation to cultural nationalist discourse in general and to the specific Canadian nation-building project. It begins by tracing the rise of biopolitical discourses on contagion in the 19 th century, explores how these discourses took on a moral-cultural character with the rise of fears of "moral contagion" and "moral degeneracy" and demonstrates how the latter fears were central to early formulations of the cultural policy/media literacy apparatus in the Victorian period. It then investigates how this Victorian fear of cultural contagion continues to animate contemporary Canadian cultural policy discourse and, through a reading of some of the Heritage Minutes, contemporary Canadian cultural nationalist texts.
Mark V. Campbell
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v5i1.288

Abstract:
For centuries Canada has been home to several overlapping diasporas partially consisting of African Americans refugees, exiled Maroons, Black Loyalists, and many others migrant groups from various African diasporas. Accordingly, the possibility of 'a' Black Canadian identity remains illusive, due in part to continual influxes of members of the African diaspora into Canada. The rigidity of a single unifying identity and the seemingly porous nature of national boundaries urges us to move towards a conceptual shift that refuses to seek a unifying discursive identity position. Importantly, black identity politics in Canada have benefited from the rise of Continental African voices in Canadian hip hop music. One of the goals of this paper is to expand the conceptual terrain of overlapping African diasporas illuminated by Continental African hip hoppers in Canada. Thus, both the lyrical innovations and geopolitical orientations of artists like Shad and K'Naan highlight the overlapping nature African diasporas in Canada, opening new ways to think more expansively about Black Canadian identity as Afrodiasporic identity. Importantly, the main contribution of this paper is to mobilize versioning as a conceptual tool that remixes our contemporary notions of Black Canada to highlight some of the ways in which we might trouble (or update) blackness in Canada, particularly paying attention to the kinds of identity interventions made possible by newcomer East African populations within Canada's diaspora space.
Richard Nimijean
Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Volume 6, pp 1-1; https://doi.org/10.22215/sjcs.v6i1.317

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