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Shir Kashi,
Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, Volume 36, pp 147-159; https://doi.org/10.3233/rnn-170756

Abstract:
The increasing number of opportunities for human-robot interactions in various settings, from industry through home use to rehabilitation, creates a need to understand how to best personalize human-robot interactions to fit both the user and the task at hand. In the current experiment, we explored a human-robot collaborative task of joint movement, in the context of an interactive game. We set out to test people’s preferences when interacting with a robotic arm, playing a leader-follower imitation game (the mirror game). Twenty two young participants played the mirror game with the robotic arm, where one player (person or robot) followed the movements of the other. Each partner (person and robot) was leading part of the time, and following part of the time. When the robotic arm was leading the joint movement, it performed movements that were either sharp or smooth, which participants were later asked to rate. The greatest preference was given to smooth movements. Half of the participants preferred to lead, and half preferred to follow. Importantly, we found that the movements of the robotic arm primed the subsequent movements performed by the participants. The priming effect by the robot on the movements of the human should be considered when designing interactions with robots. Our results demonstrate individual differences in preferences regarding the role of the human and the joint motion path of the robot and the human when performing the mirror game collaborative task, and highlight the importance of personalized human-robot interactions.
, William Msemburi, Katy Pepper, Marc I. Combrinck
Published: 3 October 2017
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Volume 60, pp 1087-1096; https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-170325

Abstract:
Dementia is a growing concern for low- and middle-income countries where longevity is increasing and service provision is poor. Global prevalence estimates vary from 2% to 8.5% for those aged 60 years and older. There have been few dementia studies in sub-Saharan Africa, and prevalence data are lacking for South Africa. To conduct a large dementia prevalence study in a low income rural population in South Africa. 1,394 Xhosa-speaking community dwellers, aged ≥60 y (mean age±sd 71.3±8.3 y), in three clinic catchment areas, were screened at home. Trained community health workers administered the brief Community Screening Instrument for Dementia (CSID) to participants and informants to assess cognitive and functional capacity. Depressive symptoms were assessed with three questions from the EURO-D. The prevalence estimate using published CSID sensitivity/specificity values was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.06–0.09). Using CSID cut-off scores the estimated prevalence was 0.12 (95% CI: 0.10–0.13), with 161 screen-positives. Both methods gave a rate of 0.11 (95% CI: 0.09–0.13) for those over 65 years (n = 1051). 68.6% of participants were female and 69.8% had less than 7 years of education. Dementia risk was associated with older age and symptoms of depression, but not with sex. The association with education was not significant when controlled for by age. Dementia prevalence estimates were higher than expected for this low-income rural community. There is a need for increased dementia awareness and feasible support interventions. We also need further studies of regional prevalences, dementia subtypes, and modifiable risk factors in South Africa.
, , Elisa Tuzzi, , Giovanni Giulietti, Virginia Failoni, , Carlo Caltagirone, , , et al.
Published: 3 October 2017
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Volume 60, pp 1015-1024; https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-170638

Abstract:
The frontal aslant tract (FAT) has been described as a bundle connecting the Broca's area to the supplementary motor area (SMA) and the pre-SMA in both hemispheres. The functional properties of this tract and its role in degenerative dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), still need to be fully clarified. The aim of this study was to explore the microstructural integrity of the FAT in patients with AD and its potential relationship with cognitive functioning. Twenty-three patients with AD and 25 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled. All subjects underwent cognitive and MRI examination. MRI, including diffusion sequences, was used for probabilistic tractography analysis. We reconstructed individual FATs bilaterally and assessed their microstructural integrity using fractional anisotropy (FA), computed as both mean tract value and voxel-wise using SPM-8. Mean FA values were then used to test for correlations with cognitive measures. Mean tract FA and voxel-wise analyses revealed that patients with AD, compared to HS, had decreased FA in the FAT bilaterally. In addition, positive associations were found between FA in the FATs and patients' performance at tests for constructional praxis and visuospatial logical reasoning. The present results reveal a bilateral damage of FAT in AD patients. The association between FATs' microscopic abnormalities and constructive abilities fits well with the knowledge of a functional involvement of SMA and pre-SMA in movement sequences when executing constructive praxis tasks. The FAT is an associative bundle critically involved in the network sub-serving constructional praxis in patients with AD.
P.N. Tandon, J.K. Misra, K.K. Srivastava
Published: 1 December 1982
Biorheology, Volume 19, pp 707-715; https://doi.org/10.3233/BIR-1982-19604

Abstract:
Most of the physiological fluids are transported through peristalsis of the walls which is the inherent neuromuscular property of tube smooth muscle structure. The present paper deals with the transport of seminal fluid introducing the microstructural effects and peripheral-layer viscosity effects on the flow rate and the drag for the system. It has been observed that the flow rate increases tremendously with the decrease of the peripheral layer viscosity whereas a reverse trend has been noted for the frictional drag. Further other sub-structural effects i.e. the effects of relative rotational viscosity and viscosity gradients have also been broughtout and discussed.
R.B. Whittington, J. Harkness
Published: 1 December 1984
Biorheology, Volume 23, pp 111-114; https://doi.org/10.3233/BIR-1984-23S119

Abstract:
This work was done as the first part of a continuing study of neonatal blood. In a recent paper (1), two parameters, "A" (relative whole-blood viscosity at unit rate of shear and 1% haematocrit) and "beta" (shear-sensitivity exponent) were proposed, as characteristics of a given blood-sample. Here, some 60 placentae yielded (after plasma-manipulation) 130 sub-samples having haematocrits ranging from 3% to 90%. Their viscosities were measured in a capillary viscometer set for a constant wall shear-stress of 1855 mPa. "A" and "beta" were calculated by the method given in (1). Multiple calculations on a number of sub-samples revealed systematic variations within any one blood; but when every A/beta ratio is plotted against the corresponding A, the results follow a smooth curve. This curve occupies a striking, almost central location when A-and-beta values from adult normal and pathological bloods (rotational viscometry) are superimposed on the diagram. An analytic form for the close correlation between haematocrit and relative placental blood-viscosity is given by the adoption of a single "group A" and "group beta" for all 130 results.
J. Stuart, M.W. Kenny, M. Meakin, G.S. Lucas, N.M. Caldwell
Published: 1 December 1984
Biorheology, Volume 23, pp 283-285; https://doi.org/10.3233/BIR-1984-23S150

Abstract:
Positive-pressure and initial-flow-rate (Hémorhéomètre) methods for the study of erythrocyte filtration through 5 micron diameter pores are highly sensitive to the presence of contaminating leucocytes in the erythrocyte test suspension. A pre-filtration step, in which heparinised or EDTA-anticoagulated whole-blood was passed through a column of Imugard IG500 cotton wool, was therefore developed. This procedure removed contaminating platelets and leucocytes, but not erythrocyte sub-populations, and is likely to improve the sensitivity and specificity of erythrocyte filtration techniques.
D. Koutsouris, R. Guillet, J.C. Lelièvre, M.T. Guillemin, P. Bertholom, Y. Beuzard, M. Boynard
Published: 1 October 1988
Biorheology, Volume 25, pp 763-772; https://doi.org/10.3233/BIR-1988-25504

Abstract:
To study the transit times of each red blood cell passing through cylindrical micropores and in order to evaluate sub-population of cells with regard to their deformability, we have developed a new system called the cell transit time analyser (CTTA). By using an AC voltage (100 KHz) across a special filter, we measure the electrical conductance change produced by the cells passing through the pores under a known driving pressure. This computer based device provides the distribution of transit times tau for 2000 cells in 1 minute and as a result the mean transit time [tau]. Experiments with red cells were designed to evaluate the flow behavior of both normal cells and cells whose mechanical properties were artificially altered. Cell volume was changed by use of non-isotonic media. Cell shape and cell volume were modified by varying the pH of the suspending buffer. Results of these experiments are: 1) a skew distribution of transit times towards high tau values for both control cells and artificially altered cells is observed: 2) [tau] is minimum for isotonic conditions and increases sharply for either hypotonic or hypertonic media: 3) [tau] is minimum at physiological pH and increases for either acid or alcaline changes of pH.
D. Koutsouris, R. Guillet, R.B. Wenby, H.J. Meiselman
Published: 1 October 1988
Biorheology, Volume 25, pp 773-790; https://doi.org/10.3233/BIR-1988-25505

Abstract:
A new red blood cell filtration system, termed the Cell Transit Time Analyzer (CTTA), has been developed in order to measure the individual transit times of a large number of cells through cylindrical micropores in special "oligopore" filters: the system operates on the electrical conductometric principle and employs special computer software to provide several measures of the resulting transit time histogram. Using this system with filters having pore diameters of 4.5 or 5.0 cm and length to diameter ratios of 3.0 to 4.7, we have evaluated the effects of several experimental factors on the flow behavior of normal and modified human RBC. Our results indicate : 1) linear PBC pressure - flow behavior over a driving pressure range of 2 to 10.5 cm H2O with zero velocity intercepts at delta P = 0, thus suggesting the Poiseuille - like nature of the flow; 2) resistance to flow or "apparent viscosities" for normal RBC which are between 3.1 to 3.9 cPoise and are independent of driving pressure and pore geometry; 3) increased flow resistance (i.e., increased transit times) for old versus young RBC and for RBC made less deformable by DNP-induced crenation or by heat treatment at 48 degrees C; 4) increased mean transit time and poorer reproducibility when using EDTA rather than heparin as the anticoagulant agent. Further, using mixtures of heat-treated and normal RBC and various percentile values of the transit time histogram. We have been able to demonstrate the presence of sub-populations of rigid cells and thus the value of measurements which allow statistical analyses of RBC populations.
, , Müzeyyen Oz, Seval Tamer
Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, Volume 30, pp 1303-1309; https://doi.org/10.3233/BMR-169673

Abstract:
To determine the effects of spinal stabilization exercises (SSE) and manual therapy methods on pain, function and quality of life (QoL) levels in individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP).A total of one-hundred thirteen patients diagnosed as CLBP were enrolled to the study. The patients allocated into Spinal Stabilization group (SG) and manual therapy group (MG), randomly. While SSE performed in SG, soft tissue mobilizations, muscle-energy techniques, joint mobilizations and manipulations were performed in MG. While the severity of pain was assessed with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form 36 (SF-36) assessments were performed to evaluate the functional status and QoL, respectively. All assessments were repeated before and after the treatment.Intragroup analyses both treatments were effective in terms of sub parameters of pain, function and life quality (p< 0.05). Inter group analyses, there was more reduction in pain and improvement in functional status in favor of MG (p< 0.05).This study showed that SSE and manual therapy methods have the same effects on QoL, while the manual treatment is more effective on the pain and functional parameters in particular.
, , Elżbieta Szczygieł, Rafał Trąbka
Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, Volume 30, pp 1095-1101; https://doi.org/10.3233/bmr-169718

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PNF and manual therapy methods in the treatment of patients with cervical spine osteoarthritis, especially their efficacy in reducing pain and improving functionality in everyday life. Long-term results were also compared in order to determine which method of treatment is more effective. Eighty randomly selected females aged 45–65 were included in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups of 40 persons. One group received PNF treatment and the other received manual therapy (MAN.T). To evaluate functional capabilities, the Functional Rating Index was used. To evaluate changes in pain, a shortened version of the McGill Questionnaire was used. The PNF group achieved a greater reduction in pain than the MAN.T group. The PNF group showed a greater improvement in performing daily activities such as sleeping, personal care, travelling, work, recreation, lifting, walking and standing as well as decreased intensity and frequency of pain compared to the MAN.T group. The PNF method proved to be more effective in both short (after two weeks) and long (after three months) term.
Jae-Ik Son, , , Heon-Seock Cynn, , Yun-Jeong Baek, Ye-Ji Jung
Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, Volume 31, pp 389-396; https://doi.org/10.3233/bmr-170798

Abstract:
Among the tools for relieving lower back pain, footrests are commonly recommended. Few studies have investigated the effects of footrest and the proper application of footrest height.The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of the normalized footrest height on muscle fatigue, kinematics, kinetics, and pain intensity.In total, 13 males who had a history of non-specific lower back pain during prolonged standing were recruited. The experimental conditions were 2-hour prolonged standing with no footrest and with footrests of 5%, 10%, and 15% of body height. Muscle fatigue was investigated through measurements of the median frequency ratio and the muscle activity ratio (post/pre) in lumbar erector spinae. The lumbo-pelvic angles, and the external moment in the lumbar region were investigated. A visual analog scale was used to investigate the intensity of the pain.The footrests at 10% and 15% of the body height caused a lower change in the median frequency ratio and the muscle activity ratio than the other conditions. The footrest at 10% of the body height placed the lowest external moment on the lumbar region among all the conditions. The pain intensity was significantly lower in with footrest conditions than with no footrest condition.The results suggests that a footrest height of 10% of the body height can be recommended as a normalized height for prolonged standing work in subjects with a history of non-specific lower back pain during prolonged standing.
Peng Li, Ping Liu,
Published: 7 September 2017
Cancer Biomarkers, Volume 20, pp 235-240; https://doi.org/10.3233/cbm-160544

Abstract:
This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic value of ultrasound in thyroid Hürthle cell tumors.A retrospective analysis was carried out on 27 patients with thyroid Hürthle cell tumors, in terms of the size, shape, boundary, echo, aspect ratio, cystic degeneration, calcification, peripheral halo sign and blood supply of the tumor, through surgical pathological validation. Then, these were compared with postoperative pathological results.The maximum diameter of the thyroid Hürthle cell tumors is between 0.6 cm and 4.6 cm. It had an oval nodule with clear boundaries, an aspect ratio > 1, and peripheral low-echo halos. Furthermore, 29.6% of tumors have even low-echo nodules without cystic changes, 48.1% and 22.1% have even medium or medium-low mixed echo nodules, and 44.4% have cystic changes in varying degrees. One nodule appeared with "micro-calcification", but pathological results confirmed that it was local collagen. Color Doppler blood flow imaging revealed that 88.8% of the nodules were surrounded with blood flow, filled with rich blood inside, and only 12.2% of the nodules had a little blood inside.Thyroid Hürthle cell tumors have nodules with even or uneven echoes on the background of the normal echoes of the thyroid, with an aspect ratio of > 1, clear boundaries and peripheral acoustic halos. Cystic changes, colloid crystallization and fibrosis can be seen inside in varying degrees. Ultrasonography has no significant value for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant Hürthle cell tumors.
Nicole M. Giamanco, Youn Hee Jee, Anton Wellstein, Craig D. Shriver, Thomas A. Summers,
Published: 7 September 2017
Cancer Biomarkers, Volume 20, pp 299-307; https://doi.org/10.3233/cbm-170145

Abstract:
Midkine (MDK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are two closely related heparin-binding growth factors which are overexpressed in a wide variety of human cancers. We hypothesized that the concentrations of these factors in washout of biopsy needles would be higher in breast and lung cancer than in benign lesions.Seventy subjects underwent pre-operative core needle biopsies of 78 breast masses (16 malignancies). In 11 subjects, fine needle aspiration was performed ex vivo on 7 non-small cell lung cancers and 11 normal lung specimens within surgically excised lung tissue. The biopsy needle was washed with buffer for immunoassay.The MDK/DNA and the PTN/DNA ratio in most of the malignant breast masses were similar to the ratios in benign masses except one lobular carcinoma in situ (24-fold higher PTN/DNA ratio than the average benign mass). The MDK/DNA and PTN/DNA ratio were similar in most malignant and normal lung tissue except one squamous cell carcinoma (38-fold higher MDK/DNA ratio than the average of normal lung tissue).Both MDK and PTN are readily measurable in washout of needle biopsy samples from breast and lung masses and levels are highly elevated only in a specific subset of these malignancies.
, Alfonso Caracuel Romero, Ivan Panyavin,
Published: 14 October 2017
NeuroRehabilitation, Volume 41, pp 527-538; https://doi.org/10.3233/nre-162144

Abstract:
To examine the prevalence of perceived ethical misconduct in clinical practice, teaching, and research in the field of neuropsychology in Spain.Two hundred and fifteen self-identified mental health professionals who engage in neuropsychology practice in Spain completed an online survey from July to December of 2013. In the ethics section of the survey, participants were asked to identify if neuropsychologists they know who work in their country engaged in specific kinds of ethical misconduct.41% reported receiving formal training in professional ethics. The clinical findings are as follows. The highest rate of perceived misconduct was found in the area of professional training and expertise, with an average of 40.7%, followed by research/publications (25.6%), clinical care (23.9%), and professional relationships (8.8%). Specifically, regarding training, over half of respondents (56.7%) know professionals who claim themselves to be neuropsychologists, even though they lack proper training or expertise and 46.0% know professionals in the field who do not have adequate training for experience to be working in the field. Regarding research/publications, 41.9% of respondents know professionals who appear as authors on publications where they have not made a significant contribution. Regarding clinical care, over one third of respondents endorse knowing professionals who (1) provide results of neuropsychological evaluations in such a way that patients or other professionals are not likely to understand (37.2%) and (2) do not have the skills or training to work with patients who are culturally different from them (34.9%).Less than half of survey respondents reported receiving ethics training. It is possible that introducing more or improved ethics courses into pre-graduate and/or graduate school curriculums, and/or requiring continuing ethics education certification may reduce perceived ethical misconduct among neuropsychological professionals in Spain.
, Yesim Akkoc, , , Ulas Sungur, Dilek Evyapan, Figen Gokcay
Published: 14 October 2017
NeuroRehabilitation, Volume 41, pp 429-435; https://doi.org/10.3233/NRE-162136

Abstract:
Lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) is one of the most frequently encountered problems in stroke.OBJECTİVE:To assess the validity and reliability of the Turkish Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS) in stroke patients with LUTD.A total of 50 patients were included in the study. The reliability was assessed using Cronbach α and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) methods, and the validity using the correlations between the subgroup and overall scores of DAN-PSS and the scores of the Barthel Index (BI), International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF), and Short Form 36 (SF-36).The Cronbach α values were found >0.97 and ICC 0.953-0.990 for all subgroup scores. We found a significant negative correlation between all the sub-scores of DAN-PSS and the BI, and a significant positive correlation between all the sub-scores of DAN-PSS and ICIQ-SF (p < 0.05). The symptom score of DAN-PSS had a significant negative correlation with the physical functioning, physical and emotional role subdomains of the SF-36 survey (p < 0.05).We have shown the reliability and validity of the Turkish DAN-PSS, and we think that it will be useful to utilize it in the monitoring of patients with stroke and in clinical studies.
, Ken-Ichi Kudo, Kenta Taguchi, Mikio Ihori, Satoru Yoshie, Takuma Yamamoto, Osamu Sudoh, Tetsuo Tsuji,
Published: 2 March 2018
Technology and Health Care, Volume 26, pp 57-67; https://doi.org/10.3233/THC-170841

Abstract:
Information and communications technology has attracted attention as a useful way of sharing care records in community-based care. Such information sharing systems, however, imposed the burden of inputting the same records into different information systems due to a lack of interoperability of the systems.The purpose of this study was to develop a gateway that links information systems and to investigate the functionality and usability of the gateway through an empirical study.We developed a gateway with healthcare and welfare professionals in Kashiwa city, Japan. The gateway system consisted of two sub-systems: a data exchange sub-system and a common sub-system. Regarding the security, we used the transport layer security 1.2 and a public key infrastructure. For document formats, we utilized the health level seven international, extensible markup language, and portable document format. In addition, we performed an empirical study with 11 scenarios of four simulated patients and a questionnaire survey to the professionals.Professionals of eight occupations participated the empirical study and verified the gateway to link information systems of six vendors. For a questionnaire survey, 32 professionals out of 40 reported that the gateway would eliminate the burden of inputting the same records into different information systems.
Correction
, Kelly L. Andrzejewski, Michael P. McDermott, Alyssa Murphy, Madhurima Majumder, Elisabeth A. de Blieck, Peggy Auinger, Merit E. Cudkowicz, Nazem Atassi
Published: 12 December 2017
Journal of Huntington's Disease, Volume 6, pp 371-371; https://doi.org/10.3233/JHD-179002

Karoline Knudsen, , Tatyana D. Fedorova, Karen Østergaard, Klaus Krogh, , ,
Published: 1 November 2017
Journal of Parkinson's Disease, Volume 7, pp 645-652; https://doi.org/10.3233/jpd-171189

Abstract:
Early-to-moderate stage PD patients demonstrated significantly decreased PP response after sham feeding suggestive of vagal denervation.
Victor Camlek
Published: 16 November 2012
Information Services & Use, Volume 32, pp 25-42; https://doi.org/10.3233/ISU-2012-0636

Abstract:
The goal of this paper is to describe selected leading indicators of global competitiveness. This will be accomplished by reviewing several selected sources that focus on various metrics. The reported data was determined to be the most recent at the time of a presentation of this material to NFAIS in February 2012. The goal of this paper is to be objective and informational. Each of the selected indicators will be described in a high-level with a brief review of significant results. This paper will illustrate that there is no one “global leader” across the various categories that are reviewed. The data will show that well established economies, such as the US and EU countries continued to maintain significant levels of funding and achievement, yet these data will also demonstrate how leading positions are being eroded by rapid advances among emerging economies led by China. The Regionally Developing Economies RDEs are visibly increasing their positions in various rankings. The data also shows that some of the smaller, yet more established economies, such as Switzerland achieved top positions when a variety of input and output pillars and sub-pillars are utilized within the assessment methodology. Switzerland has long been considered to be a wealthy economy. Finally, the presentation will review, at a high-level the status of STM publishing within an increasingly global market. The paper will summarize recent activities and point to selected RDE markets where local STM market forces are emerging, either in the form of incumbent global publishers who are establishing presence via local partnerships or country-specific publishing operations. In addition, the emerging markets feature notable in-country participants.
, Veronika Mandlik, Christian Taeger, , , Ernst-Michael Jung
Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation, Volume 67, pp 435-444; https://doi.org/10.3233/CH-179224

Abstract:
Post-operative perfusion monitoring in muscle flaps positioned at a sub-skin level may be performed superiorly by CEUS and elastography in a quick, reproducible and minimally-invasive fashion.
Li-Wei Liu, Ming-Ya Yang, Min Zhou, Jia-Jia Li, Bo Liu,
Published: 6 December 2017
Cancer Biomarkers, Volume 20, pp 609-615; https://doi.org/10.3233/cbm-170588

Abstract:
To investigate the improvement of cytotoxicity of autologous CIKs from patients with breast cancer to MCF-7 cells by suppressed PD-1 expression.The Lentiviral Vector/PD-1 carrying the gene that can suppressed PD-1 was transferred to CIK cells from patients with breast cancer to inhibit PD-1 expression. The PD-1 protein were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The positive PD-1 of CIKs and PD-L1 of MCF-7 cells were detected by FCM, and cytotoxicity of CIKs to MCF-7 was assayed by CCK-8.The PD-1 positive CIKs with Lentiviral Vector/PD-1 transferred from patients with breast cancer were 16.02%, 14.36% and 14.64% at 14th, 21st and 28th day, obviously inhibited as compared to 50.54%, 74.50% and 73.36% in CIKs without transinfection (P< 0.05); the Lentiviral Vector/PD-1 decreased the PD-1 mRNA levels in CIK cells, and Lentiviral Vector/PD-1-transferred CIKs had lower PD-1 expression; CCK-8 detection showed that at 14th day, the cytotoxicity rates of CIKs with blank plasmids and those with PD-1 transfection to MCF-7 cells were 58.78% and 68.14%, respectively.MCF-7 cells have a strong PD-L1 expression at its surface, and inhibition of PD-1 expression can improve the cytotoxicity of CIK cells.
Jian Feng, Yuanyuan Ding, Xiangyu Luo
Journal of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering, Volume 17, pp 791-798; https://doi.org/10.3233/jcm-170760

, Eva Brix, Alexandra Anker, Lukas Prantl, Vanessa Brébant, Thiha Aung
Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation, Volume 67, pp 215-219; https://doi.org/10.3233/ch-179202

Abstract:
Intra- and postoperative assessment of perfusion with near-infrared fluorescence imaging is commonly used among plastic surgeons to evaluate the quality of a microsurgical anastomosis in free flaps.As microsurgical anastomosis can be monitored with near-infrared fluorescence imaging there is potential concerning revascularized fingers and hands with soft tissue depths not exceeding 7 mm above anastomosis. In a case of a severe crush injury of the hand more information about the perfusion was necessary as clinical assessment suspected loss of perfusion.A 49-year old male suffered from a severe crush injury of his left hand with dissection of the ulnar superficial palmar arterial arch and a lesion of median nerve. After revascularization and reconstruction of the nerve, the patient developed postoperatively a loss of perfusion of thumb and index finger. An evaluation of the perfusion status was obtained by fluorescence imaging after intravenous application of ICG.After intravenous application of ICG the near-infrared imaging showed a delayed but sufficient perfusion of the hand so that a salvage surgery was not indicated.In scenarios of critical perfusion in revascularized fingers and hands, the perfusion control via application of ICG and near-infrared fluorescence imaging can be a helpful tool.
, J.E. Shui,
Published: 17 October 2017
Journal of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Volume 10, pp 313-323; https://doi.org/10.3233/npm-16141

Abstract:
The goal of this study was to determine if exposure to meconium would alter the phenotype of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) and the ability of these cells to be differentiated into distal airway type cells. Meconium was collected, lyophilized and resuspended in PBS at 3 different concentrations (high, medium, and low). AF-MSCs were cultured in the presence of this meconium suspension for 8 hours and then analyzed for changes in gene expression. Additionally, AF-MSCs exposed to meconium were differentiated for 14 days using modified small airway growth medium (mSAGM) and gene expression was determined. As a spontaneous differentiation control, meconium exposed AF-MSCs were cultured in amniotic fluid stem cell medium (AF medium). After 8 hours of exposure in culture, AF-MSCs had increased expression of distal airway genes aquaporin 5 (AQP5) and surfactant protein c (SPC) when cultured in AF medium containing meconium. These gene expression levels were similar to that of AF-MSCs that were differentiated in mSAGM for 14 days. Furthermore, there was an up regulation of pluripotency genes NANOG and OCT4 in response to low meconium concentration for 8 hours. Following 14 days of culture in mSAGM, there was an upregulation of TTF1, SPC and AQP5 expression in the control, as well as in the low and medium meconium exposed groups indicating that these cells were still able to be differentiated. High meconium concentration did, however, appear to influence the level of distal airway gene expression after 14 days in mSAGM. After 14 days in AF medium, there was significant downregulation in pluripotency and mesenchymal markers as well as distal airway gene expression in all groups. The phenotype of AF-MSCs is modulated by meconium exposure; however, the cells were still able to differentiate into distal airway gene and protein expression. This result supports the hypothesis that progenitor cells exist in the amniotic fluid and the presence of meconium may affect their initial phenotype. However, these cells were still able to be differentiated to a distal lung phenotype.
, Luís Moniz Pereira, ,
Published: 18 September 2015
AI Communications, Volume 28, pp 709-715; https://doi.org/10.3233/aic-150672

Abstract:
The mechanisms of emergence and evolution of cooperation in populations of abstract individuals, with diverse behavioral strategies in co-presence, have been undergoing mathematical study via evolutionary game theory, inspired in part on evolutionary psychology. Their systematic study resorts to simulation techniques, thus enabling the study of aforesaid mechanisms under a variety of conditions, parameters and alternative virtual games. The theoretical and experimental results have continually been surprising, rewarding and promising. In our recent work, we initiated the introduction, in such groups of individuals, of cognitive abilities inspired on techniques and theories of Artificial Intelligence, namely those pertaining to Intention Recognition, Commitment and Apology (separately and jointly), encompassing errors in decision-making and communication noise. As a result, both the emergence and stability of cooperation become reinforced comparatively to the absence of such cognitive abilities. This holds separately for Intention Recognition, for Commitment and for Apology, and even more so when they are jointly engaged. Our presentation aims to sensitize the reader to these evolutionary game theory based issues, results and prospects, which are accruing in importance for the modeling of minds with machines, with impact on our understanding of the evolution of mutual tolerance and cooperation. Recognition of someone's intentions, which may include imagining the recognition others have of our own intentions, and may comprise not just some error tolerance, but also a penalty for unfulfilled commitment though allowing for apology, can lead to evolutionary stable win/win equilibriums within groups of individuals, and perhaps amongst groups. The recognition and the manifestation of intentions, plus the assumption of commitment-even whilst paying a cost for putting it in place-and the acceptance of apology, are all facilitators in that respect, each of them singly and, above all, in collusion.SCOPUS: ar.jinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishe
Sara E. Berman, Lindsay R. Clark, Leonardo A. Rivera-Rivera, Derek Norton, Annie M. Racine, Howard A. Rowley, Barbara B. Bendlin, Kaj Blennow, Henrik Zetterberg, Cynthia M. Carlsson, et al.
Published: 29 August 2017
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Volume 60, pp 243-252; https://doi.org/10.3233/jad-170402

Abstract:
It is becoming increasingly recognized that cerebrovascular disease is a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A unique 4D-Flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, phase contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection imaging (PC VIPR), enables examination of angiographic and quantitative metrics of blood flow in the arteries of the Circle of Willis within a single MRI acquisition. Thirty-eight participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) underwent a comprehensive neuroimaging protocol (including 4D-Flow imaging) and a standard neuropsychological battery. A subset of participants (n = 22) also underwent lumbar puncture and had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) assayed for AD biomarkers. Cut-offs for biomarker positivity in CSF resulting from a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of AD cases and controls from the larger Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center cohort were used to classify MCI participants as biomarker positive or negative on amyloid-β (Aβ42), total-tau and total-tau/Aβ42 ratio. Internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean flow were associated with executive functioning performance, with lower mean flow corresponding to worse performance. MCI participants who were biomarker positive for Aβ42 had lower ICA mean flow than did those who were Aβ42 negative. In sum, mean ICA and MCA arterial flow was associated with cognitive performance in participants with MCI and lower flow in the ICA was associated with amyloid positivity. This provides further evidence for vascular health as a contributing factor in the etiopathogenesis of AD, and could represent a point to intervene in the disease process.
Taiki Sugimoto, Akinori Nakamura, Takashi Kato, Kaori Iwata, Naoki Saji, Yutaka Arahata, Hideyuki Hattori, Masahiko Bundo, Kengo Ito, Shumpei Niida, et al.
Published: 29 August 2017
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Volume 60, pp 225-233; https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-170257

Abstract:
Weight loss is frequently observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood.To clarify the associations between nutritional status and AD-related brain changes using Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB)-PET, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET, and structural MRI.The subjects were 34 amyloid-β (Aβ)-positive individuals with mild cognitive impairment or early AD (prodromal/early AD), and 55 Aβ-negative cognitively normal (CN) subjects who attended the Multimodal Neuroimaging for AD Diagnosis (MULNIAD) study. Nutritional status of the subjects was assessed by body mass index and waist to height ratio (waist circumference/height). The associations between nutritional status and brain changes were examined by multiple regression analysis using statistical parametric mapping.In the prodromal/early AD group, nutritional status was significantly positively correlated with regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) in the medial prefrontal cortices, while different topographical associations were seen in the CN group, suggesting these changes were AD-specific. Aβ deposition and gray matter volume were not significantly associated with nutritional status. Sub-analysis in the prodromal/early AD group demonstrated that fat mass index, but not fat-free mass index, was positively correlated with rCGM in the medial prefrontal areas.This present study provides preliminary results suggesting that hypometabolism in the medial prefrontal areas is specifically associated with AD-related weight loss, and decrease in fat mass may have a key role.
Anne-Marie Miller, Mircea Balasa, Kaj Blennow, Mary Gardiner, , Philip Scheltens, Charlotte E. Teunissen, , Bengt Winblad, Gunhild Waldemar, et al.
Published: 29 August 2017
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Volume 60, pp 201-210; https://doi.org/10.3233/jad-170502

Abstract:
BIOMARKAPD seeks to diminish the barriers associated with the clinical use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker analysis by reducing variation in CSF laboratory methodologies and generating consensus recommendations on their clinical interpretation and application for dementia diagnosis.To examine the disparity in practitioner attitudes and clinical practice relating to the use of CSF biomarkers for dementia diagnosis across Europe.Clinical dementia experts were surveyed on the prevalence of national consensus guidelines and analytical reimbursement across Europe; their biomarker platform preferences, lumbar puncture methodologies, and application of reference values and cut-offs for CSF analysis.74% of respondents (total n = 51) use CSF biomarkers in clinical practice and 69% performed lumbar punctures on an outpatient basis. Most use CSF biomarkers to diagnose atypical (84%) and early onset cases of cognitive impairment (71%) and for the differential diagnosis of other dementias (69%). 82% state they are sufficiently informed about CSF biomarkers yet 61% report a lack of national consensus guidelines on their use for dementia diagnosis. 48% of countries represented do not reimburse clinical CSF analysis. 43% report using normal reference ranges derived from publications.Variations in attitude and practice relating to CSF biomarkers, widely recognized as barriers to their clinical acceptance, remain evident within and between countries across Europe, even in expert centers. These shortcomings must be addressed by developing consensus guidelines on CSF-related methodologies and their clinical application to further their use for the diagnostic evaluation of dementia.
, Rui Liu, Canhua Huang, Lu Jiang, Yu Zhou, Qianming Chen
Published: 7 September 2017
Cancer Biomarkers, Volume 20, pp 345-356; https://doi.org/10.3233/cbm-170142

Abstract:
Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a chronic insidious disease which predisposes to oral cancer. Understanding the molecular markers for OSF is critical for diagnosis and treatment of oral cancer. In this study, the proteins expression profile of OSF tissues was compared to normal mucous tissues by 2 dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). The 2-DE images were analyzed through cut, spot detection and match analysis using mass spectrometry (MS). Differentially expressed genes were identified as candidates. RT-PCR, Western Blot and immunohistochemistry were performed to validate the difference in expression of the candidates between OSF and normal mucous tissues. The shRNA targeted to the candidates were then transfected by Lipofectamine2000 to the 3T3 cells to study gene function. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by MTT, clonogenic formation, PI and TUNEL staining. From the proteomic analysis, 94 of the 182 selected spots with differential expression were identified by MS analysis and Cyclophilin A (CYPA) was determined to be the OSF-associated protein candidate. The significant differences in expression between OSF and normal tissues were verified and confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot and Immunohistochemical analysis. Inhibition of CYPA expression by RNA interference suggested its potential activities involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis process. In conclusion, these results indicated a novel molecular mechanism of OSF pathogenesis and demonstrated CYPA as a potential biomarker and gene intervention targets of OSF. These data may help the development for therapeutics of oral cancer.
, , Jean Bossert, Axel Dugeny, Barbara Cagnie, Laurent Pitance
Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, Volume 30, pp 1149-1169; https://doi.org/10.3233/BMR-169615

Abstract:
To review and update the evidence for different forms of manual therapy (MT) and exercise for patients with different stages of non-specific neck pain (NP). Data sources: MEDLINE, Cochrane-Register-of-Controlled-Trials, PEDro, EMBASE. A qualitative systematic review covering a period from January 2000 to December 2015 was conducted according to updated-guidelines. Specific inclusion criteria only on RCTs were used; including differentiation according to stages of NP (acute – subacute [ASNP] or chronic [CNP]), as well as sub-classification based on type of MT interventions: MT1 (HVLA manipulation); MT2 (mobilization and/or soft-tissue-techniques); MT3 (MT1 + MT2); and MT4 (Mobilization-with-Movement). In each sub-category, MT could be combined or not with exercise and/or usual medical care. Initially 121 studies were identified for potential inclusion. Based on qualitative and quantitative evaluation criteria, 23 RCTs were identified for review. Evidence for ASNP: MODERATE-evidence: In favour of (i) MT1 to the cervical spine (Cx) combined with exercises when compared to MT1 to the thoracic spine (Tx) combined with exercises; (ii) MT3 to the Cx and Tx combined with exercise compared to MT2 to the Cx with exercise or compared to usual medical care for pain and satisfaction with care from short to long-term. Evidence for CNP: STRONG-evidence: Of no difference of efficacy between MT2 at the symptomatic Cx level(s) in comparison to MT2 on asymptomatic Cx level(s) for pain and function. MODERATE to STRONG-evidence: In favour of MT1 and MT3 on Cx and Tx with exercise in comparison to exercise or MT alone for pain, function, satisfaction with care and general-health from short to moderate-terms. MODERATE-evidence: In favour (i) of MT1 as compared to MT2 and MT4, all applied to the Cx, for neck mobility, and pain in the very short term; (ii) of MT2 using sof-tissue-techniques to the Cx and Tx or MT3 to the Cx and Tx in comparison to no-treatment in the short-term for pain and disability. This systematic review updates the evidence for MT combined or not with exercise and/or usual medical care for different stages of NP and provides recommendations for future studies. Two majors points could be highlighted, the first one is that combining different forms of MT with exercise is better than MT or exercise alone, and the second one is that mobilization need not be applied at the symptomatic level(s) for improvements of NP patients. These both points may have clinical implications for reducing the risk involved with some MT techniques applied to the cervical spine.
Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, Volume 31, pp 147-154; https://doi.org/10.3233/bmr-169733

Abstract:
This study aimed to evaluate the effect of one workday on pain and perceived exertion, muscular strength, and electromyographic activity of the erector spinae muscles in welders with and without low back pain. This is an observational cross-sectional study.Twenty-two welders, metallurgical shipbuilding, were equally divided into 2 groups: low back pain and no low back pain. Pain and perceived exertion. Muscular strength by maximal voluntary contractions and electromyographic activity of right and left erector spinae muscles during maximal voluntary contractions and in the 3 welding positions for 2 periods of the workday (in the morning and at the end of the workday).At the end of workday, the pain increased significantly for the low back pain group (t(22) = 2.448; P= 0.023). The perceived exertion also increased significantly for both groups at the end of workday groups (F(1,22) = 8.570, P= 0.000) and periods (F(1,22) = 8.142, P= 0.000). There were no significant differences between groups and workday periods for muscular strength and electromyographic activity during maximal voluntary contractions of the erector spinae. There was no significance difference for electromyographic activity between groups and workday period and in the 3 welding positions.Although the pain and perceived exertion increased at the end of the workday, these results did not interfere in muscular strength and electromyographic activity of right and left erector spinae muscles. Thus, we can conclude that welders with chronic low back pain had a good physical capacity (muscular strength) and that muscle performance was maintained.
Guang-Wei Liu, Zhao-Min Qin, Qin-Hai Shen
Published: 6 December 2017
Cancer Biomarkers, Volume 20, pp 617-625; https://doi.org/10.3233/cbm-170595

Abstract:
It is crucially important to discover the relationships between genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer. Thus, we proposed a combined bioinformatics method integrating Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC), Lasso, and causal inference method (IDA) to identify the potential miRNA targets for stomach adenocarcinoma (STAD) using Borda count election.Firstly, the ensemble method integrating PCC, IDA, and Lasso was used to predict miRNA targets. Subsequently, to validate the performance ability of this ensemble method, comparisons between verified database and predicted miRNA targets were implemented. Pathway analysis for target genes in the top 1000 miRNA-mRNA interactions was implemented to discover significant pathways. Finally, the top 10 target genes were identified based on predicted times > 3.The ensemble approach was confirmed to be a feasible method to predict miRNA targets The 527 target genes of the top 1000 miRNA-mRNA interactions were enriched in 21 pathways. Of note, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) was the most significant one. The top 10 target genes were identified based on predicted times > 3, such as GABRA3, CSAG1 and PTPN7. These targets were all predicted by 4 times. Moreover, GABRA3 and CSAG1 were simultaneously targeted by miRNA-105-1, miRNA-105-2, and miRNA-767. Significantly, among these top 10 targets, PTPN7 and GABRA3-miRNA interactions owned the highest correlation with 691.The combined bioinformatics method integrating PCC, IDA, and Lasso might be a valuable method for miRNA target prediction, and dys-regulated expression of miRNAs and their potential targets might be prominently involved in the pathogenesis of STAD.
Published: 11 August 2017
Web Intelligence, Volume 15, pp 251-268; https://doi.org/10.3233/web-170361

Abstract:
International audienceIn the real world as in the virtual one, trust is a fundamental concept. Without it, humans can neither act nor interact. So unsurprisingly, this concept received in the last years a growing interest from researchers in security and distributed artificial intelligence that gave rise to numerous models. The principal aim of these models was to assist users in making safe decisions at the individual level. However, studies have shown that the behavior of an individual within collective structures (e.g., a group, a community, a coalition or an organization) is affected (directly or indirectly) by the behavior of other members, creating a social influence dynamics within these structures. In this article, we study the impact of social influence phenomena when they are applied to trust management within open distributed communities of self-organized and self-governed agents
Michail B. Evgen’Ev, George S. Krasnov, Inna V. Nesterova, David G. Garbuz, Vadim L. Karpov, , Anastasiya V. Snezhkina, , Alexander Sergeev, , et al.
Published: 14 August 2017
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Volume 59, pp 1415-1426; https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-170398

Abstract:
Heat shock protein 70, encoded by the HSPA1A gene in humans, is a key component of the machinery that protects neuronal cells from various stress conditions and whose production significantly declines during the course of aging and as a result of several neurodegenerative diseases. Herein, we investigated whether sub-chronic intranasal administration of exogenous Hsp70 (eHsp70) exerts a neuroprotective effect on the temporal cortex and areas of the hippocampus in transgenic 5XFAD mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease. The quantitative analysis of neuronal pathologies in the compared groups, transgenic (Tg) versus non-transgenic (nTg), revealed high level of abnormalities in the brains of transgenic mice. Treatment with human recombinant Hsp70 had profound rejuvenation effect on both neuronal morphology and functional state in the temporal cortex and hippocampal regions in transgenic mice. Hsp70 administration had a smaller, but still significant, effect on the functional state of neurons in non-transgenic mice as well. Using deep sequencing, we identified multiple differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the hippocampus of transgenic and non-transgenic mice. Furthermore, this analysis demonstrated that eHsp70 administration strongly modulates the spectrum of DEGs in transgenic animals, reverting to a pattern similar to that observed in non-transgenic age-matched mice, which included upregulation of genes responsible for amine transport, transmission of nerve impulses and other pathways that are impaired in 5XFAD mice. Overall, our data indicate that Hsp70 treatment may be an effective therapeutic against old age diseases of the Alzheimer's type.
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