Refine Search

New Search

Results: 15,948

(searched for: publisher_group_id:1279)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 319
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
María Dolores Gonzales
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 1–8-1–8; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.20886

Abstract:
This tribute highlights the scholarly work of Chicana sociolinguist D. Letticia Galindo (1952–1998), whose research throughout her academic career focused on challenging biased and restricted interpretations of Chicanas’ linguistic self-expression and innovation. Letticia’s studies of members of subcultures surpass the stereotypic image of Chicanas’ language use, stressing that when women break the bonds of traditional gender roles, a liberated voice emerges: a voice that is no longer silent, passive or unidimensional. Letticia’s innovativeness opened the door for the next generation of scholars to expand research related to the legitimacy of Chicanas’ diverse linguistic repertoires. Este tributo destaca el trabajo académico de la sociolingüísta chicana D. Letticia Galindo (1952–1998), cuya investigación a lo largo de su carrera académica se centró en desafiar las interpretaciones tendenciosas y restringidas de la autoexpresión e innovación lingüística Chicana. Los estudios de investigación de Letticia sobre miembros de subculturas superan la imagen estereotipada del uso del lenguaje chicana, enfatizando que cuando las mujeres rompen las ataduras de los roles tradicionales de género, surge una voz liberada: una voz que ya no es silenciosa, pasiva o unidimensional. La innovación de Letticia abrió la puerta para que la próxima generación de académicos expandiera la investigación relacionada con la legitimidad de los diversos repertorios lingüísticos de Chicanas.
Mary Bucholtz, Deandre Miles-Hercules
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 414–422-414–422; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.20882

Abstract:
As a collaboration between the two authors, this essay first addresses each author’s individual perspective on language and gender studies, particularly as it has taken shape in the US context, and then offers a jointly developed argument regarding the field’s history and trajectory. We write from the respective standpoints of our lived experiences within and beyond the academy. Mary is a white cis female-identified linguistics professor who was deeply involved in the Berkeley Women and Language Group in the 1990s and has conducted research on language and gender throughout her career, especially with respect to its intersection with race. deandre’s Black and gender-creative subjectivity substantially colours the lens through which they experience and interpret the social life of language.
Evan Hazenberg
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 1-3; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.20887

Abstract:
Navigating Trans*+ and Complex Gender Identities Edited by Jamison Green, Rhea Ashley Hoskin, Cris Mayo and sj Miller (2020) New York: Bloomsbury, 204 pp.
Mel Y. Chen
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 396–402-396–402; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.20880

Abstract:
This recounting of early years of training in linguistics, queer theory and feminism around the time of the 1996 Berkeley Women and Language Conference examines the role of simultaneities and resonances in the formation of a critical, productive if still inchoate transdisciplinarity. Such a transdisciplinarity managed to thrive in and around institutional delimitations; it owed a great deal to the inevitability of tensions in the affective politics of scholarship, a somewhat underattended dimension of intellectual life in the university. Ao revisitar anos iniciais de meus estudos em linguística, teoria queer e feminismo que ocorreram concomitantemente ao Berkeley Women and Language Conference de 1996, este artigo examina o papel de simultaneidades e ressonâncias na formação de uma transdisciplinaridade crítica e produtiva, embora rudimentar. Tal transdisciplinaridade vingou em e ao redor de delimitações institucionais; e deve muito à inevitabilidade das tensões na política afetiva da academia, uma dimensão pouco examinada da vida intelectual na universidade.
Camila Montiel McCann
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 324–346-324–346; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.19205

Abstract:
Stereotypes of white women have historically limited their identities to that of wife and mother. Though restrictive, this type of femininity has been mobilised to create hierarchies of womanhood that legitimate this form and subordinate others. However, social change since the feminist second wave has seen the renegotiation of women’s position, and contemporary antiracist and LGBTQIA+ discourse has seen further departure from traditional ideals of femininity. Mass media is a dominant site where controlling images of women are negotiated and in which dominant, or hegemonic, forms emerge. This article applies Feminist Critical Discourse Analysis to examine popular British gossip magazine Heat’s romance and sex narratives for discourse which (re)produces, negotiates or challenges hegemonic femininity. Through the appropriation of feminist language, Heat propagates an updated hegemonic femininity which preserves the racio-patriarchal discourse of gender difference whilst pacifying feminist audiences. Estereótipos de mulheres brancas historicamente limitam suas identidades aos papéis de esposas e mães. Embora redutoras, essas categorias têm sido mobilizadas com o objetivo de criar hierarquias de feminilidade que as legitimam enquanto subordinam outras formas do feminino. Contudo, desde a segunda onda do feminismo, mudanças sociais relativas à renegociação do lugar da mulher assim como discursos antirracistas e pró-LGBTQIA+ têm possibilitado um distanciamento dos ideais tradicionais de feminilidade. A mídia de massa veicula imagens de mulheres que acabam se tornando dominantes e hegemônicas. Este artigo aplica a Análise Feminista Crítica do Discurso a narrativas de romance e sexo veiculadas na popular revista inglesa Heat e investiga discursos que (re)produzem, negociam ou desafiam a feminilidade hegemônica. Através da apropriação do discurso feminista, a revista Heat propaga uma versão atualizada de feminilidade hegemônica que preserva discursos patriarcais racializados da diferença de gênero ao mesmo tempo em que tenta apaziguar o público feminista.
Vincent Pak
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 301–323-301–323; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.20008

Abstract:
Given the social stigmatisation and legal disadvantages faced by gay men in Singapore, there is a general hesitance to be open about one’s gay identity for fear of discrimination and possible prosecution. The logic of illiberal pragmatism is taken up by the Singaporean government as a mode of governance that simultaneously constrains and frees its citizens, which forces its gay citizens to straddle the expression of their sexual identity and a sense of duty to their families. This same tension is found in gay men’s reflections on the coming out process. In ethnographic interviews conducted with 15 Singaporean gay men, concerns arise about the perceived strength and directness of coming out alongside the need to satisfy familial obligations. In response to these concerns, gay Singaporeans have adopted a ‘soft’ approach to coming out that aligns with national illiberal pragmatism. Di Singapura, ada ramai yang rasa curiga untuk menyebarluaskan identiti gay mereka kerana takut dikejam dan didakwa. Ini diakibatkan penindasan dalam masyarakat dan kekurangan perlindungan dari segi hukum yang dihadapi oleh golongan gay. Pemerintah Singapura menggunakan logik pragmatisme yang tidak liberal (‘illiberal pragmatism’) sebagai alat pemerintahan yang saling mengekang dan membebas warganya. Penggunaan logik ini memaksa warga negara gaynya untuk memilih antara menyebarluaskan orientasi seksual mereka atau memenuhi kewajiban keluarga. Pilihan sukar ini sering dibentangkan oleh lelaki-lelaki gay dalam renungan mereka tentang proses melela (‘coming out’). Dalam wawancara etnografi dengan 15 lelaki gay Singapura, kebimbangan mengenai keberkesanan proses melela dan tekanan memenuhi tanggungjawab keluarga kerap timbul. Sebagai pembalasan terhadap kebingungan tersebut, warga negara gay Singapura melela menggunakan cetak biru yang ‘lembut’ dan selaras dengan logik pragmatisme Singapura.
Kira Hall, Rodrigo Borba, Mie Hiramoto
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 394–395-394–395; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.21125

Abstract:
This thirty-year retrospective on language, gender and sexuality research, launched in anticipation of the thirtieth anniversary of the 1992 Berkeley Women and Language Conference, showcases essays by luminaries who presented papers at the conference as well as allied scholars who have taken the field in new directions. Revitalising a tradition set out by the First Berkeley Women and Language Conference in 1985, the four biennial Berkeley conferences held in the 1990s led to the establishment of the International Gender and Language Association and subsequently of the journal Gender and Language, contributing to the field’s institutionalisation and its current panglobal character. Retrospective essays addressing the themes of Politics, Practice, Intersectionality and Place will be published across four issues of the journal in 2021. In this third issue on the theme of intersectionality, Mel Y. Chen revisits the melancholy they experienced in their training as a linguist pursuing transdisciplinarity in the 1990s to highlight the broader role played by affective politics in scholarship, while Michèle Foster narrates key incidents in her life that shaped her work giving voice to Black women’s linguistic knowledge and practices. Mary Bucholtz and deandre miles-hercules, Lal Zimman and Susan Ehrlich offer incisive critiques of the field’s limits, drawing on their own positionalities to move the study of language, gender and sexuality beyond its whiteness and cis-centredness. Tommaso M. Milani thinks through the affective loading of the term ‘queer’ to set out the importance of anger and discomfort in building broader, intersectional alliances in the struggle for social justice. The theme series also pays tribute to significant scholars present at the 1992 Berkeley conference who are no longer with us; in this issue, María Dolores Gonzales offers a moving personal account of the life, work and activism of Chicana sociolinguist D. Letticia Galindo.
Tommaso M. Milani
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 439–446-439–446; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.20885

Abstract:
While anger is often treated as a ‘dirty’ feeling or a pathology, queer anger holds the potential for a renewed politics of (self-)discomfort. I draw upon queer theory in order to strategically highlight that anger is what constitutes queer both as a homophobic slur and as a reclaimed label of self-identification. Put differently, it is impossible to understand how ‘queer’ works pragmatically without its affective loading. Moreover, inspired by the Black feminist tradition, I argue that it is imperative to forge angry coalitions with other activist and academic projects against discrimination. Fuck off! is the rallying cry for building a broader defying alliance that not only marshals together various streams of anger directed at different sides of the same Leviathan, hegemony, but also does not shy away from internal annoyances and is not afraid of constantly discomforting itself. Mentre la rabbia è spesso trattata come un sentimento ‘sporco’ o una patologia, la rabbia queer detiene il potenziale per una rinnovata politica di (auto) scomodamento. Attingo alla teoria queer per evidenziare strategicamente che la rabbia sia costitutiva di queer sia come un insulto omofobico che come una rivendicata etichetta di auto-identificazione. Detto diversamente, è impossibile capire come ‘queer’ funzioni pragmaticamente senza la sua carica affettiva. Inoltre, ispirandomi alla tradizione del femminismo nero sostengo che sia necessario creare coalizioni infuriate con altri progetti accademici e militanti contro la discriminazione. Fuck off! è il grido di battaglia per costruire una più ampia alleanza provocativa che non solo metta insieme varie correnti di rabbia dirette a diversi aspetti dello stesso Leviatano, l’egemonia, ma anche che non rifugga dai contrasti interni e non abbia paura di scomodarsi costantemente.
Xinxin Wu
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 1-3; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.20888

Abstract:
Gender Approaches in the Translation Classroom: Training the Doers edited by Marcella De Marco and Piero Toto (2019) Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 200 pp.
Gwen Bouvier, Ariel Chen
Gender and Language, Volume 15, pp 347–368-347–368; https://doi.org/10.1558/genl.18825

Abstract:
Gendered identities are communicated in places as frequent and ordinary as food packaging, becoming mundane features of everyday life as they sit on supermarket shelves, in cupboards and on office desks. Multimodal critical discourse analysis (MCDA) allows us to investigate how such identities are buried in packaging in relation to health and fitness. Despite observed broader changes in gendered representations of the body in advertising, in particular relating to the arrival of ‘power femininity’, the products analysed in this article are found to carry fairly traditional and prototypical gender representations, and products marketed at both men and women highlight the need for more precise body management. For women, however, this precision is related to managing the demands of everyday life, packaged as a moral imperative to be healthy, responsible and successful.
Brian S. Bauer
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 167–170-167–170; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.20981

Abstract:
Steven R. Gullberg, Astronomy of the Inca Empire: Use and Significance of the Sun and the Night Sky Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2020. Hardback, 370 pp., 42 b/w illus., 275 colour illus. ISBN 978-3-030-48365. €135.19.
Clive Ruggles, Amanda Chadburn, Matt Leivers, Andrew Smith
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 144–156-144–156; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.19439

Abstract:
The landscape around Stonehenge contains a number of major Early Neolithic monuments dating to the fourth millennium BC, including the Stonehenge Cursus, the Lesser Cursus, Robin Hood’s Ball causewayed enclosure and several long barrows. A previously unsuspected Early Neolithic causewayed enclosure whose northeast rim was uncovered in 2016 on the slopes of Lark Hill, just to the north of the World Heritage Site boundary, represented a major new discovery. About a millennium after the construction of the Lark Hill Enclosure, a line of at least six timber posts was erected crossing from the interior to the exterior of the old enclosure, just to one side of a wide entrance. The line is slightly curved but the last three posts in the line face directly out towards the position of June solstice sunrise. While several short and longer rows of posts are now known to have been built in this vicinity both during the Later Neolithic and at later times, there are several reasons for believing this solstitial alignment to have been intentional and meaningful. It may even have represented the “monumentalisation” of an earlier broadly solstitial alignment of natural features, as has been suggested at Stonehenge itself.
Fabio Silva, Mai Rashed, Erica Ellingson, Liz Henty
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 1–5-1–5; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.20983

George Agius, Lorraine Brown Read, Frank Ventura
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 38–56-38–56; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.19438

Abstract:
The pillars at the entrance of the inner apse of one of the cluster of Neolithic temples at Mnajdra, Malta display rows of drilled holes which have been interpreted as a tally of days. Furthermore, it has been proposed that the number of holes in the rows on the east pillar coincides well with a sequence of intervals between the heliacal rising of bright stars or star groups. Is this remarkable correspondence simply a chance occurrence, or do the drilled holes represent material evidence of deliberate time reckoning by means of heliacal star risings in the Neolithic age? This question has led to the statistical investigation described in this paper, which takes into account the heliacal risings of all stars of magnitude 2.0 or brighter visible from Malta 5000 years ago as well as the Pleiades and the Hyades star clusters, which attracted the attention of other ancient cultures. The paper presents and discusses the method used and the challenges involved in the investigation. The results show that with a tolerance of ±1 day for uncertainty in the calculated heliacal rise days, the probability of achieving an exact correspondence between a random ordering of the tally and a series of star rises is 0.0014. With a wider tolerance of ±2 days the probability is 0.011. The final section discusses the significance and implications of these results.
Nikolaos Ragkos
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 95–113-95–113; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.20980

Abstract:
The historic centre of the city of Pilsen in western Bohemia, today a region of the Czech Republic, was constructed at the end of the thirteenth century, at a time when Gothic architecture was universal across most of western and central Europe. The Gothic style had emerged and developed during an era when social and economic changes were favouring the development of new urban settlements, and when the translation of ancient Greek natural philosophy, including astronomy, was giving rise to a new intellectual movement. This revival of the natural sciences was inevitably bound up with the Roman Catholic Church, since much of this knowledge had been preserved within monastic institutions and was now being used by theologians/natural philosophers who wanted to apply reason to theology. This paper’s analysis of the urban plan of the historic centre of Pilsen is an attempt to investigate the possible influence that the science of astronomy had on architectural thought and creativity in western Bohemia, and how this was represented in the light of scientific advancement.
Carole Taylor
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 157–160-157–160; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.19440

Abstract:
Günther Oestmann, The Astronomical Clock of Strasbourg Cathedral: Function and Significance. Trans. Bruce W. Irwin Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2020. Hardback xvi, 348 pp. ISBN: 978-90-04-42346-6. $179.00.
Ricardo Moyano, Patricio Bustamante
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 6–37-6–37; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.19437

Abstract:
We present the results of an archaeoastronomical analysis of structures dating from the Inca and early colonial periods in the Mapocho River basin, Chile. Our purpose is to show possible continuities or ruptures in the creation and management of architectural and natural spaces, particularly those linked to the observation of astronomical phenomena with ceremonial and calendrical significance in the Andean world. We focus on Santiago, where we undertook topographical and horizon survey work at the Main Square, Metropolitan Cathedral, San Francisco Church and Santa Lucía Hill, and evaluate documentary and ethnographic sources. Using models developed in cultural astronomy and landscape archaeology, we found these places were ancient observation spots for the Sun and Moon around the solstices, equinoxes and lunar standstills. Sightlines (ceques) may have connected these places to potentially sacred elements of the environment from a central point located in the Main Square (haukaypata).
William F. Romain
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 171–179-171–179; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.20982

Abstract:
Review of the monthly “Skyscape Archaeology Keynote Lecture Series” organised by the Journal of Skyscape Archaeology and the Sophia Centre, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, October 2020–March 2021
Fabio Silva, Liz Henty
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 180–181-180–181; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.20984

Fabio Silva
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 161–166-161–166; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.19441

Abstract:
Chris Scarre and Luiz Oosterbeek, Megalithic Tombs in Western Iberia: Excavations at the Anta da Lajinha Oxford and Philadelphia: Oxbow Books, 2020. Hardback, 242 pp. ISBN 978-1-78570-980-7. £45.00.
Luca Amendola
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 114–143-114–143; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.18113

Abstract:
Four conical golden hats of the Late Bronze Age were discovered in southern Germany and western France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Their users were probably members of a caste of priests or priestesses performing ceremonies linked to astronomical/calendrical knowledge. Another find discovered in central Germany, the Nebra bronze-gold disk, predates the golden hats by two to six centuries and has also been interpreted as an astronomical/calendrical ceremonial tool. From the burial location of the Nebra disk the Sun sets on the highest mountain of the Harz range, the Brocken, on the summer solstice. Here we investigate whether the burial location of the Schifferstadt golden hat also had an astronomical meaning. Our results make it possible to hypothesise that the Schifferstadt location was a natural astronomical/calendrical viewing place with the same function as several prehistoric circular enclosures, but where the natural hilly horizon of the Odenwald and the Palatinate Forest replaced the artificial horizon of the enclosures.
Fabio Silva, Liz Henty
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology, Volume 7, pp 182-182; https://doi.org/10.1558/jsa.20985

Premalatha Karupiah
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.43382

Abstract:
This article analyses the depiction of archaeology and archaeologists in contemporary popular Tamil films made in India, including a focus on the gender portrayal of archaeologists in two films in particular – one an adventure film depicting archaeological activity and the other a romance film involving a male archaeologist. Content analysis shows that both films portray some similarities in how archaeology is presented and that male and female archaeologists are shown as professionals, but that the female archaeologist is still presented for, and objectified through, the male gaze. The paper contributes to the understanding of how archaeologists are portrayed in non-Western films, particularly among films produced in India.
, Kelly Britt, Margaret Lou Brown,
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.43379

Abstract:
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted nearly every facet of our world, including some of the most fundamental forms of human behavior and our conception of the social. Everyday activities now pose a risk to individuals and to society as a whole. This radical shift in how we live has produced a wide array of material responses across the globe. This photo essay seeks to open up dialogue and ask questions about the numerous forms of COVID-19 materiality and altered landscapes that the authors have chronicled, witnessed, documented and cataloged in their communities, using archaeological and ethnographic methods. This materiality includes chalk art, graffiti, painted rocks and signage placed in both public and private spaces within the project authors’ communities. In framing our questions, we draw upon theoretical frameworks in the fields of cultural trauma studies, cultural anthropology and contemporary archaeology.
Hugo Cardoso
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.43380

Abstract:
OPEN ACCESS-PAID-CC BY-NC-ND In historically Protestant countries, human skeletal reference collections curated by research institutions have been amassed from bodies dissected by anatomists, typically unclaimed cadavers from morgues and hospitals, or from remains donated to science. In contrast to these anatomy-based and donation-based collections, skeletal reference collections in historically Roman Catholic countries on mainland Europe and in Latin America are for the most part derived from unclaimed remains exhumed from modern cemeteries and ossuaries at the end of the mandated interment period. While much has been written in English about the history, context and ethical framework of anatomy-derived collections, cemetery-based collections have received very little critical attention. The current paper addresses this gap, with particular reference to cemetery-derived collections in Portugal. The cultural and historical context of southern Europe is discussed, particularly Roman Catholic mortuary traditions and the influence of the Napoleonic Code, and these provide the background for an overview of the ethical issues raised by cemetery-derived collections. Here, general principles that should guide the work of human osteologists working in archaeological contexts are relevant, as regards consent, dignity and respect and benefits to science and education, because unlike their anatomy-derived counterparts, cemetery-based collections include individuals who were once buried.
Kamil Karski, Dawid Kobiałka
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.43381

Abstract:
This paper presents some of the preliminary results of non-invasive and invasive archaeological research on the terrain of a former German Nazi labour and concentration camp in P?aszów, a suburb of Kraków. The starting point is a reference to Schindler’s List – a film that is partially about the camp (KL Plaszow in German) and which created a certain social picture of it. This paper discusses the history of archaeological research relating to Holocaust landscapes in Poland, and sketches the historical context related to the opening, functioning, closing and later reusing of the campscape. The last section provides a glimpse into the archaeological field research and its results. The main thesis of this paper is that the history of World War II, including the Holocaust, is transforming in front of our eyes into archaeology. The paper shows how archaeology can play an active and crucial role in discovering, documenting and interpreting material remains related to the Holocaust and its manifold consequences.
Magnus O. Ljunge
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.42064

Abstract:
Between the late nineteenth and the mid-twentieth century numerous ski-jumping towers were built all across Sweden. This accumulation of large, monumental sporting facilities occurred even though ski jumping never attracted large numbers of practitioners. The building of such towers in the southern and central parts of Sweden, where snowy winters are far from guaranteed, is of particular interest. Today, most of the ski-jumping towers in the southern half of Sweden have been torn down, but they have left a hidden and forgotten material heritage. This paper examines the abandoned places of ski jumping, where fragmented material remains give witness to a phenomenon that once was of central importance in shaping and expressing ideals and social identities in the modernization of Sweden. The ski jumps became arenas for a new and spectacular sport that drew large crowds, but they also became landmarks and monuments of progress and prosperity in the new modern age.
, Matt Geoffrey Lotter
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.43377

Abstract:
Contemporary occupation of archaeological sites is fraught with challenges and conflicting priorities. While prevailing opinion on heritage management recognises the fluid and continuous nature of archaeological site formation, the role of present-day communities as agents of archaeological palimpsests is often not adequately acknowledged. Contemporary communities, often unrelated to the autochthonous inhabitants of the archaeological sites, occasionally use these sites and landscapes in similar or different ways to how they were used in the past. Their use of these sites, while potentially damaging to the archaeology, simultaneously adds to, and is part of, the life history of the site, of which the excavated material and rock art are but pictures in time. Squatters who appropriate archaeological heritage sites constitute ambiguous communities under current South African heritage legislation. Yet, their role as contributing agents to archaeological sites is no less real. This article presents the case study of Kruger Cave, a Later Stone Age hunter-gatherer rock art site in South Africa, currently occupied by a lay Christian pastor. We document how the pastor is using the site and offer some thoughts around the nuances of negotiating and reconciling archaeological preservation and living heritage management.
Sue Hamilton, Hetereki Huke, Mike Seager Thomas
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.43378

Abstract:
Rapa Nui’s prehistoric Polynesian heritage is iconic. From the later twentieth century the island’s economy has been dependent on the tourism its prehistory attracts. However, until recently there has been little link between the modern built environment of Rapa Nui and its prehistoric past. This article tracks how during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the island’s traditional domestic architecture was supplanted first by colonial then early modern Chilean architecture. The remains of this transformation are fast disappearing through contemporary demolition and an associated rejection of the past that the introduced architecture represents. We highlight how contemporary Rapa Nui architecture instead actively references its iconic prehistoric Polynesian past and positions Rapa Nui in a Polynesian context, for the first time detailing this trajectory and identifying how elements of past artistic and architectural traditions have become incorporated into the architecture of the present. Instead of presenting the intervening period as one of loss of traditional identity, this in fact emphasises a subtle continuity of Rapanui (indigenous Rapa Nui islander) identity. The study is relevant to exploring how the interacting demands and expectations of identity politics and heritage tourism (here in a Polynesian context) can impact on contemporary local architecture and the visitor milieu, reflecting modern concepts which promote the preservation of some architectures and cultural attributes over others.
Research on Children and Social Interaction, Volume 5, pp 33–56-33–56; https://doi.org/10.1558/rcsi.18175

Abstract:
This paper examines how young children mobilize interactional resources to position peers as neither fully included nor fully excluded in a preschool classroom. A single case of a video recording of three preschool-aged girls was analysed using conversation analysis. Two girls restricted access to a third girl and positioned her on the periphery in peer activity. The third girl’s entry into the activity was restricted through the other two’s claims of object ownership, limited physical access to objects, multi-modal practices that diverted attention away from the coveted objects, and assessments and sanctions around engagement with an object. The recurrent attempts to keep out the third girl were undertaken through partitioning. Findings highlight how children protect dyadic relationships.
Alessandra Fasulo, Iris Nomikou, Joanna Nye
Research on Children and Social Interaction, Volume 5, pp 57–79-57–79; https://doi.org/10.1558/rcsi.18065

Abstract:
The paper illustrates a practice, which we have called ‘marking’, observed in play interactions between parents and children with Down syndrome (DS) aged 3–8 years. Markings are minimal turns that rely on prosody, embodied resources and indexicality to foreground events within an ongoing activity and convey a stance toward them. Markings can be both retrospective and prospective (i.e. referring to a just-occurred or an incipient event). As first pair parts, they are open action bids that prompt recipients to display their co-orientation towards the referent. Responses from parents (i.e. second markings) can take the form of repeats or expansions; after prospective marking the recipient can also add support to the incipient activity the child has marked. We discuss marking as the core constituent of a larger family of actions for ‘sharing noteworthiness’, but also as a designedly undetermined action bid with specific conversational uses for children and adults alike.
Page of 319
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top