Refine Search

New Search

Results: 170

(searched for: journal_title:(International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine))
Save to Scifeed
Page of 4
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Mezoun Almohaimeed, Ghada Al-Arfaj, Mostafa Abbas Kofi
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 23-29; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i1a.06

Abstract:
Awareness of Primary Care Physicians about Pregnancy Screening of Group B Streptococcus Infection at Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Veena V, Sathish Chandra, Anantha Chaitanya J, Alankrit Jaiswal, Jayashree S Seeri
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 105-110; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i3b.90

H. Swetha, R Rajkamal, Christina Mary Priya Paul, S Jayakiruthiga, K Swetha
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 29-32; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i3a.80

Abstract:
Epidemiological transitions in India in the 21st century have led to non communicable diseases becoming a major public health problem of growing magnitude.
Shivani Rao, Ajay Raj Sethuraman, Pandurang Vithal Thatkar
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 131-135; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i2b.19

, Tiba Nezar Hasan
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 52-55; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i2a.10

Abstract:
Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that has many important functions. The main objective of the study is to find out mothers’ attitude towards vitamin D among infants in Baghdad city, Iraq.
Vani Srinivas, Jubeen Va, Gopika Vs, Hira Muhammed, Irfanunneeza N, Jeleeta John K, Krishnendu L
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 17-22; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i2a.04

Abstract:
School health is an important branch of
community
health. School health services is an economical and powerful means of raising
community
health. Child is vulnerable to many infectious diseases and nutritional deficiencies.
Vani Srinivas, Nimisha Nadh, Nimitha Tharakan, Gopika Gk
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 10-16; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i2a.03

Abstract:
Hypertension is a disorder that has no apparent symptoms but later results in serious health problems can pose great threat to the health of people.
Karavadi Vidusha, Naveen Sukumaran Nair, Shashikala Manjunatha
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 37-40; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i1a.08

Sanjana Chetana Shanmukhappa, Rahul R Abraham, Shalini Chandan
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 164-167; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i1c.131

Abstract:
Since its advent in the 17th century, vaccines have come a long way in preventing diseases
Neha Choudhary, Sonika Sangra, Akash Narangyal
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 109-111; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i1b.124

Abstract:
Risk assessment for non- communicable diseases among out patients visiting urban health centre in Jammu region: A cross sectional study
Muhammed Muntazeem G, Varadaraja Rao Ba, Ajeet Eti, Basanth Kumar Patil, Prakash Kengal
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 177-182; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i1c.134

Ashraf Abdrabulnabi, Mohammad Zaki Albaik, Maher A Alsakkak, Nadeer Hassan Alkhadhrawi, Ali Ahmed Alaithan, Hussein Aljuwayed
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 163-167; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i3c.97

Kannan K, Ponmalar M, Rajini S, Kavya K, Kavya Shree P, Kabith Vajan A
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 168-171; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i3c.98

Rajesh R Kulkarni
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 223-224; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i1d.138

Abstract:
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the most prevalent cause of death and disability in both developed as well as developing countries.
Kriti K Bhat, Mc Yadavannavar
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 154-158; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i3c.95

Abstract:
An epidemiological study of psychosocial factors influencing rural geriatric women in north Karnataka: A cross-sectional study
Arshied Hussain Bhat
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 2, pp 183-185; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2019.v2.i3c.102

Deepika Nagaraj, Naveen Ramesh
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 86-90; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i1b.119

Abstract:
Teachers play a vital role in the society by helping students acquire knowledge and moral values.
Amal Ghzwany, Ahmed Al Selihem, Abeer Sharahili, Alhanouf Alazmi, Esra Alhwsawi
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 4, pp 07-12; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2021.v4.i3a.198

Abstract:
Background: Elderly people need to care services in particular to maintain a high quality of life and health status. Managing the health needs of geriatric patients is part of the continuity of care family physicians provide to their patients. Aims: to assess physicians' attitude, perception and practice toward depression in elderly in primary care sitting.Methodology: A cross- sectional study to assess primary health care physicians' attitude and perceptions and practices toward depression in elderly patients in primary health care centers of King Saud medical city in Riyadh, kingdom of Saudi Arabia using self-administrated questionnaire Results: We received 210 responses to our questionnaire with response rate of 100% where 51% of them were females. PHC physicians routinely screen for sleep disturbance (79%), loss of interest or pleasure (79%), sad mood (72%), and decreased energy (63%) in order to diagnosis of depression. Moreover, we found that 56% of physicians would use clinical guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of geriatric depression. Furthermore, the main barriers to adequate diagnosis and treatment of elderly depressed patients were rejection of patients to treatment (22% of them indicated it as major problem) and difficulty for access to mental health care in our
community
(19% of them indicated it as major problem).Conclusion: we found that most of the physicians in Riyadh show high positive attitude toward depression of elderly however, there are some limitations in knowledge about symptoms of depression and restriction to guideline.
Otobo Daniel David, Okoro Ijeoma Ngozi
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 4, pp 17-22; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2021.v4.i3a.200

Abstract:
Nigeria is a country of more than 200 million citizens. Amongst these, 40% live below the poverty line and earn less than $400 dollars annually. The laws in the country does not also affect all f her citizens equally. The large gap in equity in the nation has been seen to have a direct impact on the recent public health emergency, the covid-19 pandemic that occurred. With a lot of policies put in place to cub the spread and enhance control of the virus, the country had a lot of gaps and windows for her elite citizens. This did not just cause an introduction of the virus into the country; it also played a pivotal role in the pattern of spread in the country. The paper also went further to reflect the need for government office holders to have strong unbiased knowledge of medical emergencies (Epidemics and pandemics) and their implications. The public health implications of a fall in civilization and what impacts it can have in the prognosis of public health affairs in a nation. It creates a direct linkage between the impact of government policies, civil violence and most importantly Inequity.
Naif Alqahtani, Halimah Alhifzi, Hamad Alhothaily, Mohammad Alotaibi, Omar Alkenani
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 4, pp 41-50; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2021.v4.i3a.204

Abstract:
Background: COVID-19 infection among healthcare workers is a major concern whenever a pandemic occurs. Health care professionals are the frontline in the war against this vicious outbreak which makes them at a higher risk of inquiring the infection than the general population. Use of Personal protective equipment (PPE) is considered a pivotal role in infection control measures. We aimed to study usage of personal protective equipment (PPE) among KSMC family
medicine
Residents to determine if the appropriate PPE were used by family
medicine
physician and to examine the factors that may determine inappropriate. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on Family
Medicine
Residents of KSMC, Riyadh. All levels of residency of family
medicine
specialty were included in this research. We used convenient non-probability sampling technique. Results: A total of 134 Family
Medicine
Residents of KSMC, Riyadh were finally enrolled in this study. 86% of junior and 90% of senior residents received formal training in hand hygiene in the last three years. Most of them know that the main route of cross-transmission of potentially harmful germs between patients is health-care workers’ hands when not clean. Higher percentage of junior cleaning their hands after each consultation compared to senior (98% vs 86% respectively, P = 0.009). There was no statistically significant difference between males and females residents about wearing surgical masks by suspected patients whilst in common areas or throughout the consultation, and 87% of both of them received formal training in hand hygiene in the last three years. There was a significant difference between males and females residents in their knowledge about the main route of cross- transmission of potentially harmful germs between patients (P = 0.006); a higher percentage of males know that the main route is health-care workers’ hands when not clean compared to females (58% vs 52% respectively, P = 0.006), also higher percentage of females using PPE in infection room when a patient confirmed to have Covid-19 when compared to males (97% vs 80% respectively). Conclusion: At the time of the study, most medical residents were knowledgeable, had a positive attitude, and good level of awareness was observed regarding PPE as it prevents their infection when fighting COVID-19 pandemic. Despite these findings, there were few gaps in resident’s knowledge in certain situations and this need to be addressed through more training courses regarding PPE and this which will significantly raise the level of knowledge and also will set better attitude and practices regarding PPE.
Anusha Dvb, Manoj Patruni, Pooja Chouhan, Gopa Raju A, Sanagavarapu Venkata Sai Moudgalya
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 41-45; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i2a.149

Abstract:
Study to assess the knowledge and perceptions on COVID-19, among RVM hospital staff, Siddipet district, Telangana state, South India
Ola Alalmai, Mostafa Kofi
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 46-52; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i2a.150

Abstract:
Primary health care physicians, workplace violence, primary health care, violence, Saudi Arabia
Alaa AlAhmari, Turkiah Alotaibi, Ghada Al-Arfaj, Mostafa Kofi
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 30-38; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i3a.160

Abstract:
Background: Workplace bullying is considered one of the most occupational stressors. It is widely prevalent worldwide, and healthcare settings are not an exception. Over the past few years, numerous Studies have been produced across the globe about how widespread bullying is as a behavior. One of the main areas of investigations is bullying of healthcare workers. Workplace bullying can have serious implications and significant consequences for those who are exposed like less job satisfaction, ineffective teamwork and poor communication, unnecessary leaves, reducing staff commitment to the organization, burnout, Depression and quitting.Since there is no study done in the Middle East before on bullying among postgraduate trainee we aimed in our study to measure the prevalence of bullying among residents in Saudi Arabia. And to identify the types and sources of bullying behavior faced during training years to establish roles and policies to prevent bullying based on the result of the study. As well as encourage the residents to report workplace bullying to eliminate bullying behavior in the field of healthcare.Objectives: This study aims to estimate the prevalence of workplace bullying targeting residents. Also, it aims to identify the influencing factors and consequences of workplace bullying. Methods: In this cross-sectional survey study, 500 doctors were surveyed using a self-administrated electronic questionnaire. The completed questionnaires are 419 which accounts for 83.8% response rate. Statistical analysis using the index of job satisfaction, descriptive statistics, and logistics regression was employed. The results were obtained using SPSS package version 23.Results: The estimated prevalence rate of experiencing any bullying was 70% among the sampled residents. The estimated prevalence for persistent bullying was 20 – 50%. The job satisfaction index was 55 (54.15, 55.88, p-value = 0.023). Colleagues, supervisors and team leaders are considered the main sources of bullying. The logistic regression identified certain hospital (OR = 0.07), the second-year of residency (OR = 2.17), working more than 8 hours (OR = 2.17), and on-call days per months per each day (OR = 1.13).Conclusion: Bullying among residents is a silent epidemic. Policies, awareness campaigns, and monitoring programs should be employed to effectively tackling the problem.
Barathalakshmi J, Ponmalar M, Sriram S, Tamilselvi V
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 14-17; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i3a.153

Abstract:
Study on violence against doctors and its impact on career selection
Randa Bin Madhi, Abuobaida Khugali, Mostafa Kofi
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 01-08; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i3a.151

Abstract:
Online health information seeking among patients in primary health care settings, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Nanthini Saravanan, K Kannan, S Rajini
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 09-13; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i3a.152

Abstract:
A study of breast feeding practices among rural women
Aastha Pandey
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 45-48; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i3a.162

Abstract:
Breast feeding and complementary feeding are known to play a crucial role in the growth and development of an infant. Various Global agencies recommend that Infants should be exclusively breast fed for 6 months and appropriate complementary feeding should be started at the age of six months without discontinuing breastfeeding. Though there are many awareness programmes of the Government, there are still many wrong practices and myths associated with infant feeding. This study aims to evaluate the knowledge about breast feeding and complementary feeding in pregnant women. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out in the Field Practice area of a Medical College In Maharashtra. There were 80 pregnant women in the 10 adopted villages. 58 women were interviewed for the study by the principal investigator after obtaining consent, with the help of a pretested, IYCF questionnaire formulated by Breast feeding Promotion Network of Results: Out of the 58 women interviewed, all were married and majority 50, (86.20%) were housewives. 46(79.31%) belonged to joint families. 32(55.17%) were primigravida and 26 (44.87%) were multigravida.93% had knowledge of exclusive breastfeeding but only 72% knew the correct time of initiation.57% felt that pre-lacteal foods should be given. 47% knew correct age of giving complementary foods but variety of foods to be given was not known. Myths regarding complementary foods are prevalent. 60% believed that bottle feeding should not be given. Level of education has a positive impact on infant feeding practices. Recommendations: Education regarding infant and young child feeding practices should be given to all pregnant women and also to their family members
Chethana Kv, Yuvraj By
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 235-238; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i1d.156

Abstract:
Introduction: Health Care Utilization overall, and for maternal health specifically has improved in India. The progress has been attributed to NRHM, that has increased the number of
community
health workers and resulted in more institutional deliveries. Motherhood is the basis of family life. Antenatal Care (ANC) is a pivotal factor for safe motherhood. Mothers who had not received good ANC were found to be more at risk of having Low birth weight babies. Aims 1. To assess the utilization pattern of ANC services 2. Association between the socio demographic factors and the utilization pattern Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in Urban Field Practice area, KIMS, Koppal. 327 women who delivered in one year were interviewed between 1st October 2018 to 30st September 2019 by using pre designed and semi structured questionnaire. House to house visit was done to obtain information about the antenatal care utilization and socio demographic factors. The data was entered in excel Results: Out of 328 study participants, majority 282(86%) had their ANC Checkup at Urban Health Centre, 273 (83.3%) had early antenatal registration during first trimester, 267 (81.7%) received IFA tablets. Conclusions: Due to the implementation of NRHM and the frequent monitoring of ANM and ASHA workers, our results have shown better ANC services utilization pattern in our study area.
Chandani Ashok Kumar
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 239-244; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i1d.157

Abstract:
Background: Psychosocial stress has been implicated as a risk factor for high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Medical students experience a relatively high level of professional and personal stress, with adverse consequences on academic performance, competency, professionalism, and health. This may result in altered behavior pattern and dietary habit resulting in weight change. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and association between perceived stress and body mass index. Methods: A Cross sectional study was done on 613 students in a medical college. Standardised PSQ-14 was used to calculate PSSI. Weight and height were measured by standard techniques, BMI was calculated and analysed with perceived stress. Results: The prevalence of perceived stress was 57.7% and high stress was reported among female and final year students. Academics and curriculum was the most common cause of stress, and positive coping mechanisms were used by the students to relieve stress. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 13% and 9.5% respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between perceived stress and BMI. Conclusion: The prevalence of stress was high and a significant association was found between stress and BMI. It is important to identify the sources and symptoms of stress among medical students in order to facilitate early detection and treatment, which can prevent physical and psychological morbidities later in life.
Kp Joshi, Deepak Jamadar
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 01-05; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed..v.i.142

Abstract:
Knowledge, attitude and practices regarding COVID-19 among medical students – A cross sectional study
Chetana Singode, Ramesh K, Gangadhara Goud T
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 225-228; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i1d.139

Abstract:
A study on obstetric profile of antenatal mothers in a
community
: Cross sectional study
Joud G AL Darsoni, Norah A AL Shehri
International Journal of Advanced Community Medicine, Volume 3, pp 09-14; https://doi.org/10.33545/comed.2020.v3.i4a.169

Abstract:
Aim: To assess maternal awareness of developmental milestones, and some of the factors that affects her level of knowledge. In addition, to address some of the sources they seek for information. Methods: A cross-sectional study of the knowledge of developmental milestones exhibited by 358 mothers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: A large majority of the women (84.6%) scored poorly in terms of knowledge, and there was a clear connection between educational levels and knowledge levels. Other variables - such as age, occupation, marital status, income, number of children- had no influence on the scores.Conclusion: Mothers in Saudi Arabia have poor knowledge of developmental milestones and this stems from the relationship between mothers and healthcare professionals. One way of tackling this issue is to ensure that all new parents are provided with evidence-based educational resources - for example, leaflets - as well as information on children's development, either by nurses or doctors.
Page of 4
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top