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International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, Volume 12; doi:10.7710/2168-0620.0312

Abstract:
Although time is a topic that humans have discussed at length for ages, only recently have sociologists examined time and its relationship to society. The goal of this study aims to investigate the relationship between the time schemes of individuals in everyday life to the macrostructures under dominant control. The study uses qualitative in depth interviews and found (1) a common sense of productivity permeates everyday life and interactions (2) respect and timeliness are linked through expectations of productivity (3) people change their expectations about timeliness given certain contexts. This work suggests that more research is needed that takes into account how everyday routines are embedded and reinforced through hegemonic time.
Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, Volume 8; doi:10.7710/2162-3309.2365

Abstract:
INTRODUCTION Data management education has been part of library service models for almost 2 decades. This paper describes a pilot graduate student education program whose framework shows interdependencies between data management practices, uses a flipped classroom model to allow maximum time for implementation, and whose primary activities are entirely student research based. lLITERATURE REVIEW Education in data management encompasses many different formats (in-person, online, synchronous, asynchronous). Within this instruction, Data Information Literacy competencies help define student-learning objectives for data management tasks. Currently data management education is a combination of theory and active learning, with students asking for more hands-on practice. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program is an 8-week, in-person, flipped classroom series that addresses all data life cycle stages and aligns with many Data Information Literacy competencies. It is entirely student research data focused in that activities require that they use their projects, with significant time allocated to implement these practices while in the classroom. NEXT STEPS With a 69% retention rate and student improvement in seven foundational data management concepts, this program is considered a success. Future work involves converting this program to a credit-bearing course.
Health, Interprofessional Practice and Education, Volume 4; doi:10.7710/2641-1148.2131

Abstract:
INTRODUCTION Opioid use disorder impacts families in the United States from all walks of life with premature loss of life and devastating financial and social consequences. An online interprofessional program was designed and implemented to assist pre-licensure health professions students to understand the complexities of the opioid epidemic. The program included information related to the epidemic’s impact on individuals, patients, families and the community, solutions to this crisis, and the benefit of interprofessional care in to addressing the epidemic. METHODS The purpose of this study was to explore students’ perceptions of individuals experiencing opioid use disorder and the value of interprofessional care. There were 217 students of medicine, dental, nursing, emergency medical services, and physical therapy who participated in the discussion-board format activity that enabled them to acquire new knowledge and apply it to two unfolding case studies of individuals experiencing opioid use disorder. RESULTS Thematic analysis was applied to the discussion that was generated from the activity. Six themes were identified from the discussion board responses: 1) Opioid use disorder can happen to anyone, 2) Mismanaged health care contributes to opioid addiction, 3) Overwhelming life stressors can impact opioid use, 4) Seeking relief from chronic pain can dominate a person’s life, 5) A strong sense of empathy and compassion is essential for health professionals, and 6) Interprofessional collaboration improves outcomes. CONCLUSION This educational strategy was an effective approach to engage students in informed discussions regarding the complexities of the epidemic and to appreciate the benefit of interprofessional care in addressing opioid use disorder.
International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, Volume 12; doi:10.7710/2168-0620.0311

Abstract:
The modernist period ushered forth numerous scientific and philosophical theories that had a notable influence on art, literature, psychology, and philosophy. Discoveries such as Einstein’s general theory of relativity inspired theologians, philosophers, and psychologists to focalize new concepts of self, identity, time, reality, and human experience. These shifts in contemporary human understanding developed in concurrence with increased global travel and intellectual exchange between Western and Eastern countries. As a result, writers, philosophers, and artists became more interested in Buddhism and other Eastern philosophical beliefs. Virginia Woolf, while being a self-proclaimed atheist, was deeply influenced by Eastern philosophy and well versed in contemporary scientific theories. Drawing on literary and biographical criticism of Virginia Woolf, I trace the intersections of Eastern philosophical beliefs and Western scientific theories through the stream of consciousness narration of Mrs. Dalloway by analyzing both what and how things are experienced by individual characters. In the novel, the integration of each character's stream of consciousness fabricates a dissonant medium in which singular moments in the present time are experienced through the minds of multiple characters, while they simultaneously navigate past spans of time within their individual narrative consciousness. Through the analysis of narrative form and narrative consciousness in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, it is possible to track the impact of Eastern philosophies and Western scientific theories in the novel’s exploration of external and internal perceptions of reality.
Health, Interprofessional Practice and Education, Volume 4; doi:10.7710/2641-1148.2126

Abstract:
BACKGROUND The Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL) instructional model utilizes Peer Leaders, advanced students who mentor and guide student teams to collaborate on applied course concepts. PURPOSE To apply a modified PLTL model in the university’s foundational, longitudinal, competency-based interprofessional education (IPE) curriculum. METHODS Twelve Peer Leaders were selected, trained, and deployed as facilitators for interprofessional teams of students during the IPE curriculum’s first three large-scale learning events. Peer Leaders completed an evaluation of training, a facilitation skills survey, and participated in a semi-structured focus group interview process. RESULTS After participating in the PLTL program, Peer Leaders reported increased confidence in their interprofessional knowledge and facilitation skills. The primary challenge for Peer Leaders in facilitating teams was lack of student engagement (n=7, 58%). CONCLUSION PLTL is a feasible model for IPE settings. It has the potential to both increase facilitator capacity in interprofessional learning activities and have a positive impact on Peer Leaders.
Health, Interprofessional Practice and Education, Volume 4; doi:10.7710/2641-1148.2121

Abstract:
Interprofessional education encourages collaboration between several student healthcare professionals to provide experiences crucial to their success after graduation. Incorporating interprofessional education into the curriculum can be challenging, however it strengthens students’ skills to work in a team and establishes understanding of roles and responsibilities. An interprofessional course, created by faculty from multiple institutions, effectively taught students through online learning modules as well as hands-on experiences such as simulations and communication activities. Activities included an identification questionnaire, TeamStepps paper chain, ambulatory care simulation, and a poverty simulation day. Throughout this course students learned about their roles, other professionals' roles, the importance of verbal and nonverbal communication, and the impact effective teamwork has on patient care.
Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, Volume 8; doi:10.7710/2162-3309.2371

Abstract:
INTRODUCTION Like the scholarly communication system it aims to transform, open advocacy work is broad in scope and reflects many influences, practices, and players. Despite having a rewarding mission, scholarly communication librarians frequently juggle multiple roles, may experience isolation and career stagnation, and produce outputs that are not readily understood. METHODS These challenges inspired the creation of the Open Action Kit, a suite of tools to help practitioners plan, execute, and assess open advocacy weeks, particularly Open Access Week. This resource sought to make explicit parallels between the activities and scope of open advocacy work and leadership skills that could aid in career progression. RESULTS The project’s aims and structure matured to focus on a broader, critical appraisal of the nature of scholarly communication work. Its encouragement of dialogue between its members and audience more thoroughly recognized and addressed the tensions between open advocacy work and professional success. DISCUSSION Open advocates expressed many frustrations with their work: they often felt isolated or burnt out, hindered by structures or expectations from their organization. While relational work is fundamental to the cultural change inherent in scholarly communication work, the overly simplistic, quantitative measures typical of library assessment do not accurately capture its nuance or complexity. CONCLUSION Centering the relational components of open advocacy work is necessary for it to be successful, sustainable, and appropriately valued. While the Open Action Kit has not been updated since 2017, it serves as a useful model for translating and centering relational work through distributed leadership, advocacy, and skill development.
Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, Volume 8; doi:10.7710/2162-3309.2382

Abstract:
Research data services in academic libraries is often perceived as the purview of liaison librarians. A variety of models has emerged by which these services may be developed or implemented. These include hierarchical models and those based more on individual interest. Of critical importance with any model, however, is the identification of support and opportunities for engagement from library administration and management in order to grow and assess the implementation of research data services.
Health, Interprofessional Practice and Education, Volume 4; doi:10.7710/2641-1148.2125

Abstract:
Dentistry is treated as a separate entity from the main healthcare systems in America. Specifically, there is a distinct disconnect between dental students and interprofessional education. This detachment is problematic because dentists utilize interprofessional collaboration to accomplish complex patient care. Interprofessional education is an important part of the Doctor of Dental Surgery curriculum because consideration of both oral and systemic health is necessary during dental treatment. Interprofessional education provides opportunities to educate dental students about other disciplines, educate other disciplines about dentistry, and foster collaboration between healthcare students.
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