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(searched for: doi:(10.4037/*))
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Md Aluko A. Hope, PhD Cindy L. Munro
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 415-417; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020334

Vinciya Pandian, Linda L. Morris, Martin B. Brodsky, James Lynch, Brian Walsh, Cynda Rushton, Jane Phillips, Alphonsa Rahman, Troy Derose, Leah Lambe, et al.
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020561

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rhonda Board
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 419-419; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020411

EdD Bobbie Ann Adair White, Do Heath D. White, Christie Bledsoe, Randy Hendricks, Md Alejandro C. Arroliga
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020886

Abstract:
Background Conflicts in medical settings affect both team function and patient care, yet a standardized curriculum for conflict management in clinical teams does not exist. Objectives To evaluate the effects of an educational intervention for conflict management on knowledge and perceptions and to identify trends in preferred conflict management style among intensive care unit workers. Methods A conflict management education intervention was created for an intensive care team. The intervention was 1 hour long and incorporated the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument as well as conflict management concepts, self-reflection, and active learning through discussion and reviewing clinical cases. Descriptive statistics were prepared on the participants’ preferred conflict management modes. A pretest/posttest was analyzed to evaluate knowledge and perceptions of conflict before and after the intervention, and 3 open-ended questions on the posttest were reviewed for categories. Results Forty-nine intensive care providers participated in the intervention. The largest portion of participants had an avoiding conflict management mode (32%), followed by compromising (30%), accommodating (25%), collaborating (9%), and competing (5%). Pretest/posttest data were collected for 31 participants and showed that knowledge (P < .001) and perception (P = .004) scores increased significantly after the conflict management intervention. Conclusions The conflict management educational intervention improved the participants’ knowledge and affected perceptions. Categorization of open-ended questions suggested that intensive care providers are interested in concrete information that will help with conflict resolution, and some participants understood that mindfulness and awareness would improve professional interactions or reduce conflict.
PhD Marilyn Schallom, PhD Donna Prentice, Msn Carrie Sona, Bs Kara Vyers, Cassandra Arroyo, Brian Wessman, Md Enyo Ablordeppey
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 458-467; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020741

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PhD Jean Connor, Mph Lauren Hartwell, PhD Jennifer Baird, Mph Benjamin Cerrato, Mph Araz Chiloyan, Mph Courtney Porter, PhD Patricia Hickey
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 468-478; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020884

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Linda Bell
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 479-479; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020231

Armeen Poor
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 418-418; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020519

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Rn Shannon A. Cotton, Ms Chelsea E. Roche, Atul Malhotra
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 418-418; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020542

PhD Maya N. Elías, PhD Cindy L. Munro, PhD Zhan Liang
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 484-488; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020132

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