Refine Search

New Search

Advanced search

Results: 5,216

(searched for: doi:(10.25071/*))
Save to Scifeed
Page of 522
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Babitha Shanmuganandapala
Published: 14 July 2020
INYI Journal pp 12-13; doi:10.25071/1929-8471.52

Abstract:
The following piece summarizes the key findings of the 2013/2014 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children report 'Growing up unequal: gender and socioeconomic differences in young people's health and well-being'.
Nazilla Khanlou
Published: 14 July 2020
INYI Journal pp 15-15; doi:10.25071/1929-8471.55

Nazilla Khanlou
Published: 14 July 2020
INYI Journal pp 1-1; doi:10.25071/1929-8471.47

Esra Ari
Published: 13 July 2020
INYI Journal pp 4-11; doi:10.25071/1929-8471.50

Abstract:
This research examines the effects of “race” and “class” on the economic and social integration of second-generation Jamaicans (n=23) and Portuguese (n=20) in Canada. This qualitative study uses interview data to compare the role of multiculturalism in the integration of two second-generation immigrant groups. I find that the integration of these two groups differs based on their visible minority status and their social class. These results are important to develop policies for the integration of racialized native-born youth into a multiethnic society.
Niche Administrators
Papers in Canadian History and Environment; doi:10.25071/10315/34215

Kim English
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 122-133; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.50

Abstract:
This reflection paper represents my own efforts at personal reconciliation as a settler nurse educator. A portion of these efforts include my analysis and experience of the current state of nursing academia within the context of our profession’s necessity to meet relevant calls to action stated within the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report. Key issues such as problematic texts accepted as ‘nursing fundamentals’, the invisibility of Indigenous knowledge coupled with the perpetuation of colonial stereotypes are discussed within the context of Nbwaa-ka-win. The application of post-colonial theory as part of a strengths-based approach to the decolonization of nursing education is presented.
Sara Scott, Tracey L. Clancy, Carla Ferreira
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 111-121; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.49

Abstract:
The transformative experience of engaged presence in teaching and learning fosters trust and supports learners and teachers to explore, learn, and grow in their understanding of who they are becoming. Enacting presence in teaching becomes an act of care and creates an embodied space for learners to engage in authentic learning and enter the realm of self-authorship. Self-authorship encourages the cultivation of one’s internal voice to construct beliefs, identity, and social relationships to be able to give up one way of making meaning to adopt a deeper meaning (Baxter Magolda, 2009, 2014). This reflective writing circle captures the essence of a master’s student and two educators’ transformative learning as they journey together in relationship towards a deeper understanding of their Indigenous and Settler identities and respond to the Calls to Action. Keywords: presence, authentic learning, self-authorship, Calls to Action, writing circle
Bernice Downey
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 97-110; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.59

Abstract:
Health equity is defined in ways that espouse values of social justice and benevolence and is held up as an ideal state achievable by all. However, there remains a troubling gap in health outcomes between Indigenous Peoples and other Canadians. Public health stakeholders aspire to ‘close the gap’ and ‘level the gradient’ to reduce inequities though the implementation of various health equity focused strategies. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada echoes this objective and calls for self-determining structural reform to address health inequity for Indigenous Peoples. This paper proposes an IND-equity model as a reconciliation inspired response that upholds Indigenous self-determination and is informed by diverse Indigenous ways of knowing. When adopting this model, the goal is to complete the circle and foster wholistic balance. Further development and implementation of an IND-equity model requires advocacy by all health practitioners. Nurses hold potential to lead and engage in structural reform through an Indigenous health ally role.
De-Ann Sheppard
Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, Volume 2, pp 51-65; doi:10.25071/2291-5796.57

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Page of 522
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top