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(searched for: doi:(10.1667/*))
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Andrew J. Grosovsky, Amy Kronenberg, Edouard I. Azzam
Published: 2 October 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 345-350; doi:10.1667/rade-20-00jbl

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sunita Chopra, Maria Moroni, Shannon Martello, Michelle Bylicky, Jared May, Bernadette Hritzo, Laurel Macmillan, Sciprofile linkC. Norman Coleman, Sciprofile linkMolykutty J. Aryankalayil
Published: 16 September 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 411-430; doi:10.1667/rade-20-00123.1

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Kouki Uchinomiya, Kazuo Yoshida, Masahiro Kondo, Masanori Tomita, Toshiyasu Iwasaki
Published: 16 September 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194; doi:10.1667/rade-20-00034.1

Abstract:
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Jing Tang, Qinfeng Xiao, Zhiguo Gui, Baosheng Li, Sciprofile linkPengcheng Zhang
Published: 15 September 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 363-378; doi:10.1667/rr15552.1

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Andrea L. Dicarlo, Aaron C. Bandremer, Brynn A. Hollingsworth, Suhail Kasim, Adebayo Laniyonu, Nushin F. Todd, Sue-Jane Wang, Ellen R. Wertheimer, Carmen I. Rios
Published: 11 September 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 315-344; doi:10.1667/rade-20-00120.1

Abstract:
In the wake of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the U.S. Government re-focused attention on the potential threat from a radiological or nuclear incident on U.S. soil. In response to growing concerns about the ability of the Government to mount a medical response to such a disaster, several agencies were tasked with the mission to support research to develop medical countermeasures (MCMs) to diagnose (biodosimetry) and treat radiation injuries in the wake of a mass casualty, public health emergency. One of these organizations was the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Since 2004, the NIAID has supported countermeasure development across the entire spectrum of radiation research: development of animal models, basic research to identify and target biological pathways involved in the radiation damage response, and advanced development of approaches needed to obtain approval2 for marketing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), also a part of HHS, supports late-stage activities needed for product approval and is responsible for procurement of products to be placed in the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile (SNS). In parallel, the FDA provides guidance to drug developers seeking approval of products for a radiation countermeasures indication, for which efficacy studies in humans cannot be feasibly or ethically obtained. Referred to as the “Animal Rule” (1), the FDA created a pathway that has been used to obtain approval for three MCMs to treat hematopoietic complications resulting from radiation exposure: filgrastim (Neupogen®, FDA approved March 2015);3 pegfilgrastim (Neulasta®, FDA approved November 2015);4 and sargramostim (Leukine®, FDA approved March 2018).5
Sciprofile linkJ. Ramos-Méndez, N. Domínguez-Kondo, J. Schuemann, A. McNamara, E. Moreno-Barbosa, Bruce Faddegon
Published: 28 August 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 351-362; doi:10.1667/rade-20-00084.1

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Sciprofile linkCarmen I. Rios, Andrea L. Dicarlo, Libero Marzella
Published: 28 August 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 310-313; doi:10.1667/rade-20-00132.1

Abstract:
Multiple cases of human exposure to radiation have been documented from the atomic bombings, nuclear power plant disasters and other industrial and medical accidents. Many of these exposures have led to pronounced cutaneous radiation injury (CRI), which played a significant role in the progression of damage and survivability of the radiation exposure and led to a lifetime of pain and scarring. Documentation of CRI from routine clinical radiotherapy and diagnostic procedures has also provided valuable information about the natural history of the injury. In response to the threat of a radiological or nuclear incident, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services tasked the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) with identifying and funding early- to mid-stage medical countermeasure (MCM) development to treat radiation-induced injuries. Although there are now products to treat radiation-induced bone marrow damage, there are still no approved products specific for the treatment of CRI. To accurately assess severity of CRI and determine efficacy of different treatments, animal models must be developed that simulate what is seen in humans. It is also important to understand techniques used in other clinical indications to accurately assess the extent of skin injury and progression of healing. For these reasons, the NIAID partnered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)2 and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) to identify state-of-the-art methods in assessment of skin injuries, explore animal models to better understand radiation-induced cutaneous damage and explore treatment approaches. A two-day workshop was convened in Rockville, MD on May 6 and 7, 2019, highlighting talks from 28 subject matter experts across five scientific sessions, and from this workshop a report was generated (1). This commentary provides a brief overview of the data presented at the workshop, and the key points that were considered during the discussion sessions that were held throughout the meeting. A more complete background and discussion of the workshop are available in the full report.
Sciprofile linkFrank De Vocht, Mira Hidajat, Richard M. Martin, Raymond Agius, Richard Wakeford
Published: 27 August 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 431-444; doi:10.1667/rade-19-00007.1

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Sciprofile linkTatsuhiko Sato, Sachiyo Funamoto, Colin Paulbeck, Keith Griffin, Choonsik Lee, Harry Cullings, Stephen D. Egbert, Akira Endo, Nolan Hertel, Wesley E. Bolch
Published: 19 August 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 390-402; doi:10.1667/rr15546.1

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A. Bertolet, M. A. Cortés-Giraldo, A. Carabe-Fernandeza
Published: 17 August 2020
Radiation Research, Volume 194, pp 403-410; doi:10.1667/rade-20-00045.1

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