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The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1272-1273; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.79

The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1274-1275; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.81

, Joel Epstein, Dana Villines
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1240-1247; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.83

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Leslie Hyman, Wei Hou, Thomas W. Oates, Michael Reddy, David W. Paquette, James A. Katancik, Steven P. Engebretson
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1227-1239; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.92

Abstract:
Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing health problem worldwide. People with T2DM are at risk of experiencing periodontitis and likely require treatment. Using data from the national multicenter Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT), the authors assessed patient-based characteristics associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical therapy. Methods. The DPTT investigators randomly assigned adults with T2DM (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] ≥ 7 percent and < 9 percent) and moderate to advanced periodontitis to receive immediate or delayed therapy (scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, chlorhexidine rinse). The investigators assessed probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), and medical conditions at baseline, three months and six months. Six-month changes in mean PD, CAL and BOP defined the treatment response. Complete data were available for 473 of 514 DPTT participants. The authors used multiple regression models to evaluate participant-level factors associated with the response. Results. More severe baseline PD, CAL and BOP were associated with greater improvements in these same measurements (P < .0001). Hispanic participants experienced greater improvements in PD and CAL than did non-Hispanic participants (P < .0001). Obese participants (those with a body mass index > 30 kilograms per square meter) experienced greater reductions in PD and BOP than did participants who were not obese (P < .001). Age, sex, HbA1c values, diabetes duration, and smoking were not associated with change in any outcome (P > .1). Conclusions. In patients with T2DM, baseline disease severity was associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Body mass index and Hispanic ethnicity—but not glycemic control, diabetes duration or smoking—also may be useful in predicting clinical changes in this population. Practical Implications. These findings could help clinicians identify patients with T2DM who may or may not respond well to initial periodontal treatment.
Bruce L. Pihlstrom,
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1208-1210; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.112

The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1262-1267; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.113

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Patrick Galloway, Peggy Alexander, Adriana Vargas Green, Guy Huynh-Ba, Jocelyn Feine, C. Alex McMahan
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1218-1226; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.93

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Bruce A. Dye, Catherine R. Kolasny, Dennis W. Buckman, Timothy S. McNeel, Norman Tinanoff, Teresa A. Marshall, Steven M. Levy
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1254-1261; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.95

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Elizabeth Moncada
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1268-1271; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.210

William Walton
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1276-1277; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.91

Kevin H. Ludwig, Margherita Fontana, LaQuia A. Vinson, Jeffrey A. Platt,
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1248-1253; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.89

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Karina De Oliveira Bernades, Leandro Augusto Hilgert, Ana Paula Dias Ribeiro, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel Garcia,
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1120-1127; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.84

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Spiro J. Megremis, Victoria Ong, Henry Lukic, Hank Shepelak
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1164-1166; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.97

, Shaza Bishti, Susanne Stampf, Wael Att
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1133-1140; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.87

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Michael H. Halasz
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1172-1173; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.77

, Riva Touger-Decker
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1153-1158; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.78

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Gregg H. Gilbert, Ellen Funkhouser, James D. Bader, Valeria V. Gordan, , Vibeke Qvist, Pia Nørrisgaard, National Dental PBRN Collaborative Group
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1112-8; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.82

Abstract:
A questionable occlusal caries (QOC) lesion can be defined as an occlusal surface with no radiographic evidence of caries, but caries is suspected because of clinical appearance. In this study, the authors report the results of a 20-month follow-up of these lesions. Fifty-three clinicians from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network participated in this study, recording lesion characteristics at baseline and lesion status at 20 months. At baseline, 1,341 QOC lesions were examined; the treatment that was planned for 1,033 of those at baseline was monitoring (oral hygiene instruction, applying or prescribing fluoride or varnish, or both), and the remaining 308 received a sealant (n = 192) or invasive therapy (n = 116). At the 20-month visit, clinicians continued to monitor 927 (90 percent) of the 1,033 monitored lesions. Clinicians decided to seal 61 (6 percent) of the 1,033 lesions (mean follow-up, 19 months) and invasively treat 45 (4 percent) of them (mean follow-up, 15 months). Young patient age (< 18 years) (odds ratio = 3.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.7-6.8) and the lesion's being on a molar (odds ratio = 1.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.3-2.6) were associated with the clinician's deciding at some point after follow-up to seal the lesion or treat it invasively. Almost all (90 percent) QOC lesions for which the treatment planned at baseline was monitoring still were planned to undergo monitoring after 20 months. This finding suggests that noninvasive management is appropriate for these lesions. Previous study results from baseline indicated a high prevalence of QOC lesions (34 percent). Clinicians should consider long-term monitoring when making treatment decisions about these lesions.
Bruce Lee Pihlstrom
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1161-1163; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.86

, André A. Farquharson
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1141-1145; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.88

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Marko Vujicic
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1167-1169; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.100

Julie Kazimiroff, Kia Zeram, Perry Cohen, Jairo Bastidas, Victoria A. Muggia, Jacqueline Polanco,
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1146-1151; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.71

The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1170-1171; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.75

, Andrew J. Pakchoian, Didem Dagdeviren, Adel Alzahrani, Elnaz Jalali, ,
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1130-1132; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.85

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Samir Singh, , Daniel Laskin
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1052-1057; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.63

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, John P. Morgan, Angel Park, Konstantina E. Yantsides, Carrie J. Nobles, Matthew D. Finkelman, Paul C. Stark, Aviva Must
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1018-1025; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.64

Abstract:
Little is known about effective at-home oral care methods for people with developmental disabilities (DDs) who are unable to perform personal preventive practices themselves and rely on caregivers for assistance. A convenience sample of 808 caregivers (84.5 percent paid, 15.5 percent family members) who accompanied adults with DDs (20 years or older) to appointments at a specialized statewide dental care system completed computer-assisted personal interview surveys. The authors used these data to investigate caregivers’ at-home oral care experiences and to explore differences between caregivers who were paid and those who were family members. Caregivers reported that a high proportion (85 percent) of dentate adults with DDs received assistance with tooth cleaning. They also reported a high prevalence of dental problems, and low adherence to brushing (79 percent) and flossing (22 percent) recommendations. More caregivers reported that they felt confident assisting with brushing than with flossing (85 percent versus 54 percent). Family members and paid caregivers differed with respect to confidence and training. At-home oral care, particularly flossing, presents substantial challenges for adults with DDs. Solutions must be tailored to address the different experiences and distinct needs of the family members and paid caregivers who assist these adults. Caregivers play an important role in providing at-home oral care, and they must be included in efforts to improve oral health outcomes for people with DDs.
, Philip M. Westgate
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1027-35; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.69

Abstract:
The authors conducted medical laboratory screenings in a dental setting to determine the relationships between the laboratory test results and self-reported medical health findings. The authors collected serum, urine and medical histories from 171 patients (116 [68 percent] women; mean age, 43.4 years) who arrived for dental treatment as a component of a clinical trial and performed complete blood cell counts, standard blood chemistry panels and urinalysis on the samples. The authors found 414 abnormal laboratory test results (an average of 2.42 per patient). Eighty-three percent of participants had one or more abnormal test results, 83 percent had abnormal test results and did not indicate a relevant disease in their medical history, and 18 percent had laboratory test results outside the 99 percent reference range (that is, > three standard deviations from the mean). Abnormal test results were significantly associated with sex, age, race and medical history (P< .05). Abnormal test results associated with kidney disease were related to patients with cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as those who tended to be on average older than 50 years. The high frequency of significant abnormal laboratory test results detected in this study suggests that many patients may be unaware of their medical statuses. Abnormal laboratory test results are detected frequently in the serum and urine of patients arriving for dental treatment, which could indicate undiagnosed disease and less than optimal medical management.
, Paul K. Blaser, Ronald E. Watson, Ivar A. Mjör, Deborah L. McEdward, Luis G. Sensi, Joseph L. Riley
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1036-1043; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.57

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Robert L. Merin
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1058-1062; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.65

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Adam A. Edwards
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1073-1074; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.67

Gary D. Klasser, Luisana Echandi, Michael Shannon
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1063-1067; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.70

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Jennifer J. Post,
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1044-1050; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.61

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1071-1072; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.68

Comment
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 1068-70; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.72

The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 941-948; doi:10.14219/jada.2013.48

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 972-973; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.53

Simony H.H. Kataoka, , Eudes Gondim, Celso L. Caldeira
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 956-959; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.54

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Astrid L. Kruse, Dominik A. Ettlin
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 964-965; doi:10.14219/jada.2013.4

, Amy M.S. Slep, , Shu Xu, Ananda P. Dasanayake, Mark S. Wolff
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 924-930; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.55

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Steven J. Barket, Elizabeth A. Bilodeau
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 961-963; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.62

Bruce Lee Pihlstrom
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 969-971; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.66

, Charles N. Bertolami
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 910-911; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.38

, Maureen Canavan, Elizabeth Bradley
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 932-939; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.48

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Antonio Celentano, Daniela Adamo, Stefania Leuci, Michele Davide Mignogna
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 950-954; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.58

Abstract:
Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS) encompasses several rare disorders linked to mutations of the PTEN gene, including Cowden disease (CD) and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS). The authors present a case series involving patients with characteristic periodontal features. The authors assessed three patients, two of whom already had been diagnosed with BRRS: a 60-year-old man and his 33-year-old daughter, both of whom had pathognomonic oral and cutaneous manifestations, and a 26-year-old man affected by multiple micropapillomatous and keratotic periodontal lesions, through which the diagnosis of CD was made. All three patients were referred to the oral medicine unit of the authors' institution because of asymptomatic lesions of the oral mucosa, and two of them underwent incisional biopsy. This series of cases emphasizes that oral health care workers always should perform a more careful visual inspection of the oral cavity without neglecting a macroscopic analysis of the gingival pattern. The knowledge of these diseases and their clinical features, associated with a multidisciplinary approach, allows clinicians to achieve remarkable diagnostic success. Gingival manifestations may represent one of the primary clinically detectable manifestations of these rare systemic diseases, in respect of which an early diagnosis could decrease the associated mortality and morbidity.
A. R. Scarbrough
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 974-975; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.60

, Anne E. Sanders, Sally M. Mauriello, Linda M. Kaste, James D. Beck
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 805-16; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.31

Abstract:
Hispanics and Latinos are an ethnically heterogeneous population with distinct oral health risk profiles. Few study investigators have examined potential variation in the burden of periodontitis according to Hispanic or Latino background. The authors used a multicenter longitudinal population-based cohort study to examine the periodontal health status at screening (2008-2011) of 14,006 Hispanic and Latino adults, aged 18 to 74 years, from four U.S. communities who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American or South American. The authors present weighted, age-standardized prevalence estimates and corrected standard errors of probing depth (PD), attachment loss (AL) and periodontitis classified according to the case definition established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology (CDC-AAP). The authors used a Wald χ(2) test to compare prevalence estimates across Hispanic or Latino background, age and sex. Fifty-one percent of all participants had exhibited total periodontitis (mild, moderate or severe) per the CDC-AAP classification. Cubans and Central Americans exhibited the highest prevalence of moderate periodontitis (39.9 percent and 37.2 percent, respectively). Across all ages, Mexicans had the highest prevalence of PD across severity thresholds. Among those aged 18 through 44 years, Dominicans consistently had the lowest prevalence of AL at all severity thresholds. Measures of periodontitis varied significantly by age, sex and Hispanic or Latino background among the four sampled Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos communities. Further analyses are needed to account for lifestyle, behavioral, demographic and social factors, including those related to acculturation. Aggregating Hispanics and Latinos or using estimates from Mexicans may lead to substantial underestimation or overestimation of the burden of disease, thus leading to errors in the estimation of needed clinical and public health resources. This information will be useful in informing decisions from public health planning to patient-centered risk assessment.
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 859-861; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.45

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Ove Peters, Vassilios Kaitsas, Francesca Angiero, ,
The Journal of the American Dental Association, Volume 145, pp 843-848; doi:10.14219/jada.2014.46

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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