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(searched for: Seizure Disorders in Children with Special Needs, Approach to Management)
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Khalid Ibrahim
Journal of Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health, Volume 4, pp 38-41; doi:10.26502/jppch.74050039

Abstract:
Seizure is a common symptom in the pediatric age group. The prevalence of seizure disorder is higher in children with special needs. Seizures, their etiology, associated comorbidities, their treatment and the other management needs do have an impact on these children’s quality of lives, their educational needs, provision of other care needs as well as impact on their caregivers. In this review, an overall assessment of seizure disorder in the group of children with special needs, highlighting the challenge in diagnosis, selection of therapeutic agents, the impact on education, the need for comprehensive care plans as well as the combined effect of seizures and the associated underlying comorbidities on these children and their families.
Published: 3 June 2019
Neuropediatrics, Volume 50, pp 338-340; doi:10.1055/s-0039-1685523

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Megan N. Scott, Scott J. Hunter
Journal of Pediatric Epilepsy, Volume 6, pp 001-002; doi:10.1055/s-0036-1584917

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Colin Reilly, Rebecca Ballantine
Published: 14 November 2011
by Wiley
Support for Learning, Volume 26, pp 144-151; doi:10.1111/j.1467-9604.2011.01501.x

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Published: 4 April 2011
by Wiley
Epilepsia, Volume 52, pp 90-94; doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03011.x

Abstract:
The comprehensive care of a patient with Dravet syndrome encompasses both the “care” and the “cure” of the patient, and requires cooperation among family, doctors, and several other specialized caregivers to search for the attainment of the best quality of life for the patients and their families. Several issues peculiar to the disease to be faced while dealing with the patient are: (1) SMEI is an “evolving” disease that appears in an otherwise healthy child with symptoms that appear and mutate throughout the course of the disease; (2) the severity of the disease is not fully predictable at onset and appears to be individual‐specific; (3) the seizures are invariably drug resistant and seizure freedom is not a realistic goal; and (4) in addition to seizures many other invalidating clinical problems, including cognitive impairment, behavior disorders, and a number of comorbidities characterize the disease course. The comprehensive caring must be physician‐guided and patient‐centered and implies a multidisciplinary approach to be built around the children and caregivers, who need to be guided through the steps of the diagnosis, treatments, and managements of the various comorbidities.
Mark S. Yerby
Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy, Volume 20, pp 159S-170S; doi:10.1592/phco.20.12.159s.35249

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Budden
Published: 1 March 1997
Medscape women's health, Volume 2

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S S Budden
Published: 1 January 1997
European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Volume 6

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