Refine Search

New Search

Results: 13

(searched for: Periodontal Effects of Orthodontic Expansion Devices)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Miral Agarwal, Ayush Jain, Shradha Jain
European Journal of Dental and Oral Health, Volume 2, pp 7-10; https://doi.org/10.24018/ejdent.2021.2.5.93

Abstract:
The aim of this review article is to identify and present an overview on the effects of different palatal expansion device on periodontium. Orthodontic treatment is a popular option for adolescents and adult patients for achieving better alignment of teeth and better esthetics. Palatal expansion technique is useful in treatment of patients’ malocclusion. With newer palatal expansion devices, patient’s malocclusion can be treated in better way. It is important to understand that oral hygiene plays an important role in the maintenance of periodontal health during orthodontic treatment. In adult patients, regular monitoring regarding the periodontal health should be performed prior to and during orthodontic treatment.
Published: 1 March 2021
by MDPI
Materials, Volume 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14051152

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to compare the reduced stresses according to Huber’s hypothesis and the displacement pattern in the region of the facial skeleton using a tooth- or bone-borne appliance in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME). In the current literature, the lack of updated reports about biomechanical effects in bone-borne appliances used in SARME is noticeable. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used for this study. Six facial skeleton models were created, five with various variants of osteotomy and one without osteotomy. Two different appliances for maxillary expansion were used for each model. The three-dimensional (3D) model of the facial skeleton was created on the basis of spiral computed tomography (CT) scans of a 32-year-old patient with maxillary constriction. The finite element model was built using ANSYS 15.0 software, in which the computations were carried out. Stress distributions and displacement values along the 3D axes were found for each osteotomy variant with the expansion of the tooth- and the bone-borne devices at a level of 0.5 mm. The investigation showed that in the case of a full osteotomy of the maxilla, as described by Bell and Epker in 1976, the method of fixing the appliance for maxillary expansion had no impact on the distribution of the reduced stresses according to Huber’s hypothesis in the facial skeleton. In the case of the bone-borne appliance, the load on the teeth, which may lead to periodontal and orthodontic complications, was eliminated. In the case of a full osteotomy of the maxilla, displacements in the buccolingual direction for all the variables of the bone-borne appliance were slightly bigger than for the tooth-borne appliance.
, O Rossi, L Paglia, G Marzo, A Caprioglio
Published: 1 June 2019
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Journal of Achievements in Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, Volume 1-2, pp 26-31; https://doi.org/10.5604/01.3001.0013.4138

Abstract:
Purpose: The aim of the study was to determine forces which are transferred to supporting teeth during the treatment with the midpalatal device with Hyrax screw and to evaluate orthodontic and orthopaedic effects based on displacement analysis. Design/methodology/approach: The finite element method (FEM) was used to simulation the midpalatal expansion forces activated by the screw pre-loaded during a turn of 180° which corresponds to daily recommended value. Distribution of expansion forces of Hyrax device was calculated as reaction forces on elastic supports with stiffness corresponding to the teeth working on periodontal ligament in alveolar bone. Findings: On the basis of the displacement analysis was observed the movement of supporting teeth by a value higher than 0.1 mm which corresponds to the recommended daily value. The midpalatal suture splitting forces were determined on the first premolars with a value of 32.8 N and on the first premolars of 44.2 N. Research limitations/implications: The studies did not take into account the shape of palate other craniofacial bones and their stiffness. Practical implications: Adjusting the stiffness of the device to degree of ossification midpalatal suture and teeth mobility. Searching for new solutions which eliminate the negative phenomenon of tilting teeth during the expansion of maxilla and recommending a surgically assisted techniques. Originality/value: The simulation confirmed that treatment with Hyrax screw gives a uniform expansion with values of forces corresponded to stiffness of premolar and molar teeth. The studies have indicated a possibility of tendency to tilting the supporting teeth what is a negative phenomenon.
Álvaro Furtado, Gisela-Crippa Furtado, Ossam El Haje, Henrique-Damian Rosário, , ,
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4317/jced.55139

Abstract:
Orthopedic rapid maxillary expansion (RME) is a common treatment of choice for managing transverse deficiency of the maxilla. This approach may have desired and undesired skeletal, dental and periodontal effects that may be assessed clinically or through imaging techniques. This study aims to investigate the dental, skeletal and periodontal effects of orthopedic RME using the soft-tissue cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) technique. The sample consisted of 10 patients (5males and 5 females) aged between 10 and 14 years (mean age: 12.5 years) treated with Hyrax orthopedic device. CBCT scans set for the registration of soft tissue (ST-CBCT) were taken from each patient before (T1) and 120 days after (T2) RME. Skeletal (n=10), dental (n=1) and periodontal (n=4) parameters measured in ST-CBCT were compared between T1 and T2 using t-test within a significance level of 5%. The skeletal parameters with statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in T2 were the width of the buccal alveolar bone crest, the external width of the dental arch at the level of buccal cusps, and the width of the dental arch at the level of most prominent dental surface contour. Representing the dental parameter, the inclination of the anchor teeth was statistically significant for premolars (p<0.05). The only statistically significant outcome in periodontal parameters was the decrease in buccal bone plate thickness of first molars (p<0.05). Dentists must be aware of the ST-CBCT technique for the analysis of hard and soft tissue after orthodontic and orthopedic treatments. This technique revealed that the RME reached optimal skeletal and dental effects with minimal periodontal side effects. Key words:Cone-beam computed tomography, imaging, orthodontics, orthopedics.
Paul White, Santinoni Cd, Oliveira Hf, Batista Ve, Lemos Ca, Verri Fr
Faculty Opinions – Post-Publication Peer Review of the Biomedical Literature, Volume 169; https://doi.org/10.3410/f.727661361.793540073

Abstract:
PURPOSE: This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to enhance maxillofacial area bone repair.METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies published up to February 2017 and listed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases was performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement.RESULTS: The 15 selected studies evaluated a total of 374 patients (mean age, 28.5years) who were treated with LLLT. Gallium-arsenide (GaAs) and gallium aluminium arsenide (GaAlAs) were the most commonly used devices, and LLLT parameters varied greatly. Wavelengths varied from 500 to 1000nm. Tooth extraction, distraction osteogenesis, maxillary expansion, periodontal defects, orthodontic movement and maxillary cystic defects were evaluated. From the 15 selected studies, six evaluated bone repair (primary outcomes). Of these, four studies showed improvement in bone formation after using LLLT, two demonstrated improved results for only one follow up period, and one showed no additional benefits. The other 9 studies evaluated secondary parameters related to healing (secondary outcomes) in the maxillofacial area after applying LLLT, including anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and healing accelerator effects, and quality of life related to oral health. There were no adverse or negative effects of LLLT reported.CONCLUSION: Within the limitation of this review, a possible improvement in bone density can be found when LLLT is applied postoperatively in maxillofacial bony defects. LLLT also seems to promote anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects and accelerate healing, as well as enhance quality of life related to oral health. However, LLLT use protocols need to be standardized before more specific conclusions can be drawn about this subject.Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
, Arun Chitharanjan, Vignesh Kailasam
National Journal of Maxillofacial Surgery, Volume 5, pp 6-13; https://doi.org/10.4103/0975-5950.140148

Abstract:
Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to perform rapid maxillary canine retraction through distraction of the periodontal ligament and investigate the rate and amount of canine retraction, amount of anchor loss, the nature of tooth movement achieved, and radiographic changes in the periodontal ligament region during and after canine distraction. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 10 distractions ranging in age from 14 years to 25 years who needed canine retraction and first premolar extraction in the maxillary arch. Ten canine distractions were carried out with custom-made, tooth-borne intra-oral distraction device. Results: The results indicate that the periodontal ligament can be distracted just like the mid-palatal suture in rapid palatal expansion and the maxillary canines are retracted rapidly into the first premolar extraction space at the rate of about 2.53 mm/week. Conclusion: Though this study indicates that the periodontal ligament can be distracted to elicit rapid tooth movement, the long-term effects of canine distraction are not well known and need close monitoring. Clinical Significance: This technique has the potential to significantly reduce orthodontic time.
Published: 23 November 2009
Biodental Engineering II pp 29-34; https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203855195-8

Abstract:
Orthodontics searches for reaching occlusal equilibrium and the functionality of the stomatognathic system: bones, teeth, periodontal ligament, tongue, temporomandibular joints (TMJ) and other oral biological structures, that can happen during the growth of a person. When this equilibrium is not reached, morphological changes, known as malocclusions, occur. Malocclusion problems resulting from the maxilla’s narrowing are commonly found in the population. They lead to dysfunctions in the jaw joint and alterations in chewing, speech and breathing. Patients should be treated precociously so that the results allow for proper aesthetic improvements. Steady dental position and a remodeled bone contour are desired through a functional occlusal gear for attaining normality. These bone growth disturbances cause an unfavorable esthetic effect that impacts in the self-esteem of the patients. Malocclusion patients, mainly children and teenagers, as well as young adults, need orthodontic and orthopedic treatment to open the maxillary suture and bone remodeling of the palatal contour and a better architecture of the dental arches. The orthodontist should know the level of applied forces in the oral correction devices and the clinical follow up of the treatment. The treatment involves reactions of organic structures, starting with inflammatory process, prevention pain and irreversible injuries to live tissues as well as uncontrolled bone resorption and lost of tooth elements (Proffit, 1995; Burst & MacNamara, 1995). The connection between physical phenomena and organic reactions, in addition to knowledge of the material properties, is essential to get the expected results from the treatment. One of the techniques for correction of this pathology requires the installation of a mobile device in the mouth that allows bone remodeling, with a bone resorption area and deposition of neoformed bone tissue. It is necessary to use a methodology that correlates the imposed displacement with the bone structure deformation, cortical as well as trabecular, and the impact absorption by the mucosa, quantifying the level of forces and stresses reached. The purpose is to arrive at a less traumatic application of forces, attenuating painful symptoms such as chronic headaches, partial necrosis of the bone and even the loss of dental elements. The mechanisms of the dental movement phases and bone remodeling should preserve the biological and functional integrity of the stomatognathic system, not only the dental elements but also the occlusal gear, the periodont and the temporomandibular joint, as well the aesthetic and individual characteristics of the patients (Sandy et al., 1993). Expansion screw is the main orthopedic accessory used to allow bone remodeling in the dental arch with objective to correct deviations in the shape and boundary of the buccal bone and to reach an adequate dental occlusion (Haas, 1965; Silva Filho, 2007).
, E.B. Wolvius, A.J.M. Schulten, W.C.J. Hop, K.G.H. van der Wal
International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Volume 38, pp 308-315; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijom.2009.02.012

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
C. Provatidis, B. Georgiopoulos, A. Kotinas, J.P. McDonald
Published: 30 June 2007
Medical Engineering & Physics, Volume 29, pp 566-579; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medengphy.2006.03.007

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top