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(searched for: Parasitoids Collected in Poultry Farms in Brazil)
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European Journal of Biology and Biotechnology, Volume 2, pp 39-40; doi:10.24018/ejbio.2021.2.3.203

Abstract:
The objective of this work is to report the presence of dipteran parasitoids in poultry farms in Brazil. The experiment was carried out in two poultry farms in the Midwest Region in Brazilian territory. The pupae were removed and individualized in glass capsules for the emergence of adult dipterans or parasitoids. The specie Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) presented a frequency of 46.4% and showed parasitism of 93.9%. The species Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) presented a frequency of 93.3%. Of the dipterans collected, the most important species was M. domestica for causing public health problems, disturbing people and being a vector of disease-causing agents.
Published: 15 November 2019
Qeios; doi:10.32388/800319

Abstract:
This study had as objective to verify the parasitoids associated with synanthropic dipterous in manure chicken, in Morrinhos, State of Goiás, Brazil, from August to December 2007. The pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergency of the adult flies or their parasitoids. The percentage of parasitism was 27.9%. This paper reports the first occurrence of M. raptorellus parasitizing Musca domestica in Brazil. Key words: Hymenoptera, dipterous, natural enemy, insects pests, eggs.
, Angelo P Do Prado
Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, Volume 15

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Maria A. Ferreira De Almeida, , Angelo Pires Do Prado
Environmental Entomology, Volume 31, pp 732-738; doi:10.1603/0046-225x-31.4.732

Abstract:
Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead is a gregarious endoparasitoid that attacks third instars of muscoid flies, including house flies, Musca domestica L. A colony of this parasitoid was established from samples collected from a poultry farm in Santa Cruz da Conceição, São Paulo, Brazil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of feeding treatment, host density and temperature on attack rates on T. zealandicus. Parasitoids that were given honey as adults attacked two to three times as many house fly larvae (25 host attacks/female/d) as parasitoids that were given only water or nothing. Host attacks and progeny production by T. zealandicus on house fly and Chrysomyia putoria increased over the range of host:parasitoid ratios tested, reaching a maximum of 21–22 hosts killed and 13 progeny produced/female/d at the highest host density of 32 larvae/female. Host attacks were higher at 22°C than at the other temperatures studied (20–29°C), but differences in attack rates were small over the range of 20–27°C (10–13 host attacks/female). Comparatively few hosts (6.3) were attacked at 29°C. Higher rates of progeny production also were observed among parasitoids tested at lower temperatures (9–11 progeny produced/female at 20–22°C) than at 29°C (1.8 progeny/female). Females of T. zealandicus that were stored at 15°C after emergence had highest rates of host attacks (58–62 hosts killed per group of five female parasitoids) and progeny production (174–261 progeny) after 6–12 d of storage at this temperature; relatively few hosts were attacked or parasitized (6–9 host attacks and progeny/group) after 0 or 1 d at 15°C.
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