Refine Search

New Search

Results: 2

(searched for: Dental Laser in The Covid-19 Era)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Natalia Elson, Irene Brandes, Steven Resnick
European Journal of Dental and Oral Health, Volume 2, pp 4-6; https://doi.org/10.24018/ejdent.2021.2.5.86

Abstract:
Despite the many historical events during the year 2020, this period of time will forever be remembered as the year of COVID-19. Since its onset in November 2019, The Sars-CoV-2 has made an enormous impact across all aspects of society across the entire world. Globally as of July 5th, 2021, there have been 184000000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, which tragically include 3980000 deaths. Sars-CoV-2 is spread through the respiratory system with the primary modes of transmission being aerosol, respiratory droplets, and direct contact. It is of great importance to understand that one of the primary modes of transmission, the aerosol (bioaerosol) mode is a mode that is omnipresent in most dental settings. To prevent dissemination of disease in American dental offices, the CDC and the ADA have developed strict protocols for dental care providers to follow. Protocols include case selection, protective equipment (PPE), Covid testing, procedure risk stratification, and reduction of aerosols. Laser-assisted dentistry has been identified as a potential key modality in the reduction of bio aerosols.
Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Volume 30, pp 119-125; https://doi.org/10.17219/acem/130598

Abstract:
The COVID-19 pandemic forced dental professionals to cope with an unexpected challenge and caused an abrupt cessation of conventional care practices. The high degree of contagiousness as well as the diffusion of the virus through the air and droplets via respiratory transmission placed dental professionals at top-level risk of contracting and spreading the disease. General recommendations were announced in different countries, including patient distancing, air ventilation, surface and instrument sanitization, and the wearing of suitable masks and shields. However, many dental treatments are performed using lasers, and some specific precautions must be added to conventional procedures to ensure the advantages of this technology to patients because of the particular tissue-matter interaction effects of laser wavelengths. Based on the literature, the authors evaluated all of using laser wavelengths to analyze the risk and the benefits of using lasers in daily dental practice, and to provide safety recommendations during pandemic. An unrestricted search of indexed databases was performed. Laser use effects were categorized into: 1) explosive processes that produce tissue ablation and aerosol formation; 2) thermal actions that create vaporization and smoke plume; 3) photobiomodulation of the cells; and 4) enhanced chemical activity. Knowledge of the device functions and choice of adequate parameters will reduce aerosol and plume formation, and the application of suction systems with high flow volume and good filtration close to the surgical site will avoid virus dissemination during laser use. In the categories that involve low energy, the beneficial effects of lasers are available and sometimes preferable during this pandemic because only conventional precautions are required. Lasers maintain the potential to add benefits to dental practice even in the COVID-19 era, but it is necessary to know how lasers work to utilize these advantages. The great potential of laser light, with undiscovered limits, may provide a different path to face the severe health challenges of this pandemic.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top