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Dylan Engelbrecht
Building Multiplayer Games in Unity pp 171-194; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4842-7474-3_6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 4 December 2021
by MDPI
Diversity, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13120645

Abstract:
The Japanese Rose (Rosa rugosa) is a perennial shrub belonging to the family Rosaceae. It was introduced in Europe from East Asia as an ornamental plant in the XIX century and is now considered an invasive species, especially in northern Europe, colonising the Atlantic and Baltic coastal dune habitats and threatening local biodiversity. However, little is known about its presence and invasion patterns in the Mediterranean area. In Italy, R. rugosa has been classified as naturalised and just a few observations have been recorded in dune habitats in the North Adriatic coast. Here, we review the published data on R. rugosa in Europe and present preliminary data on the invasive pattern of R. rugosa on the Italian North Adriatic coast. We surveyed the coastline in two locations (i.e., Brussa and Bibione, Italy) where we characterised the dimension and structure (i.e., number of ramets and stem height) of the R. rugosa populations and listed the associated floristic composition. No occurrence of R. rugosa was recorded in Bibione, probably due to the success of the restoration project carried out on that site. In contrast, several stands of R. rugosa were found in Brussa, where many other alien species were also found (accounting for 15.28% of the sampled species). Given the strong invasiveness of R. rugosa, it is important to keep data on its distribution up-to-date and investigate its ecology and physiology to promote appropriate management strategies to control its spread and anticipate its future potential distribution.
, Rupert Wegerif
The Palgrave Encyclopedia of the Possible pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-98390-5_239-1

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Radhika Mishra, Ariunbuyan Sukhbaatar, Sora Shouta, Maya Sakamoto, Shiro Mori, Tetsuya Kodama
Poster Presentations - Late-Breaking Proffered Abstracts, Volume 20; https://doi.org/10.1158/1535-7163.targ-21-lba051

Abstract:
Metastasis is known to be the prime cause of cancer associated fatality. It is therefore imperative to treat and prevent metastasis in order to curb cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. Metastatic lymph nodes (MLNs) are known to be crucial diagnostic and prognostic indicators. Furthermore, as per the lymph node mediated hematogenous theory, due to extant communication between the lymphatic network and the venous system, the lymphatic network facilitates the passage and subsequent colonization of tumor cells to distant sites, thus, serving as a starting point for distant metastasis even during the initial stages. Treatment of MLNs, therefore, is imperative. Proposed in 2015, the Lymphatic Drug Delivery System (LDDS) is a novel and promising drug delivery system for the treatment of MLNs that overcomes the limitations of conventional chemotherapy. Unlike systemic chemotherapy, LDDS entails a direct intranodal drug administration to sentinel lymph node, post its identification using radioisotopes and fluorescent molecules, in order to treat it and its downstream lymph nodes. Previous studies have documented the superior efficacy of LDDS as a MLN management strategy as compared to conventional therapy. Higher drug delivery to target sites and prolonged retention with lower systemic toxicity, and thereby stronger anti-tumor effect have been reported to have been achieved upon drug administration via LDDS. In the present study, MXH10/Mo/lpr mice and FM3A-Luc, mouse mammary carcinoma cells expressing the firefly luciferase gene, have been utilized for the establishment of a mouse model of Lymph node metastasis (LNM) to investigate the effect of drug osmotic pressure and viscosity on therapeutic efficacy of the LDDS. Two lymph nodes, exhibiting systemic lymphadenopathy, in the subiliac and axillary region, the subiliac lymph node (SiLN) and proper axillary lymph node (PALN) have been used to model a network of interconnected human lymph nodes. Drug solution of varying osmotic pressure and viscosity were administered via LDDS to the murine model of LNM and subsequently therapeutic efficacy was monitored using the high frequency ultrasound system, VEVO and bioluminescent imaging system, IVIS, and confirmed through histology. The study revealed an optimized window of drug osmotic pressure and viscosity (π = 1000 - 2000 kPa; µ = 0.9 - 11.5 mPa·s.) where a significantly stronger anti-tumor response was observed. Venturing below or beyond the optimized range results in decreased therapeutic efficacy. The study therefore concluded that drug osmotic pressure and viscosity are important fluid parameters that require careful consideration prior to preparation of drug cocktails as they can severely impact the prognosis. The findings of this study have the potential for translation to clinics and we anticipate that these results can be replicated in clinical trials, positively altering the fate of many cancer patients. Citation Format: Radhika Mishra, Ariunbuyan Sukhbaatar, Sora Shouta, Maya Sakamoto, Shiro Mori, Tetsuya Kodama. Importance of drug osmotic pressure and viscosity for efficient drug delivery using lymphatic drug delivery system [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the AACR-NCI-EORTC Virtual International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics; 2021 Oct 7-10. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Mol Cancer Ther 2021;20(12 Suppl):Abstract nr LBA051.
, Katharina Hawlik, Claudia Wild
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, Volume 37, pp 3-3; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0266462321000726

Abstract:
Introduction: The idea of using extracorporeal cytokine adsorption therapy (ECAT) is to remove cytokines from the blood in order to restore a balanced immune response. Yet, it is unclear as to whether the use of ECAT improves patient-relevant outcomes. Hence, the aim of this article is to synthesize the currently available evidence with regard to a potential clinical benefit of ECAT used in cardiac surgery or sepsis.Methods: We conducted an updated systematic review summarizing the body of evidence with regard to a potential clinical benefit of ECAT. The study followed the PRISMA statement and the European Network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) guidelines. The quality of the individual studies and the strength of the available evidence was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool (v.1) and the GRADE approach respectively. Mortality, organ function, length of stay in the intensive care unit and length of hospitalization, as well as adverse events, were defined as critical outcomes.Results: For the preventive treatment of ECAT in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, we found very low-quality inconclusive evidence for mortality (5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), n = 163), length of stay in the intensive care unit (5 RCTs, n = 163), and length of hospitalization (3 RCTs, n = 101). In addition, very low-quality inconclusive evidence was found for (serious) adverse events (4 RCTs, n = 148). For the therapeutic treatment of ECAT in patients with sepsis/ septic shock, we found very low-quality inconclusive evidence for mortality up to 60-day follow-up (2 RCTs, n = 117), organ function (2 RCTs, n = 117) and length of stay in the intensive care unit (1 study, n = 20). Similarly, very low-quality inconclusive evidence was found for (serious) adverse events (2 RCTs, n = 117). There are currently eighteen ongoing RCTs on the use of ECAT.Conclusions: There is a lack of reliable data on the clinical benefit of using ECAT as an add-on treatment preventively in cardiac surgery and therapeutically in patients with sepsis or septic shock. While theoretical advantages are anticipated, the current available evidence is inconclusive and was not able to establish the efficacy and safety of ECAT in combination with standard care in the investigated indications. In light of the available RCTs, we strongly recommend the consideration of studies with patient-relevant endpoints and adequate statistical power, instead of investing further research funds on small studies that may not shed more light onto the potential clinical benefit of ECAT. The results of ongoing RCTs are awaited to guide the decision on whether further research funds should be invested in ECAT research or to conclude that the intervention may not show clinical benefits for patients.
Jasmine Desclaux-Salachas, Lucile Bataille
Published: 3 December 2021
Proceedings of the ICA, Volume 4, pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.5194/ica-proc-4-28-2021

Abstract:
Probably by dint of seductive appearances and overflowing passion for cartography, by dint of instant accessibility to all kind of maps and any graphic representations commonly called ‘maps’ and finally by dint of confusions between what is an IMAGE and what is a DATA, everyone forgets that, at the dawn of a cartographic project, ‘THE MAP STILL DOESN’T EXIST’. For it to exist, a scope of collective work and essential skills are necessary. First of all, the aim of a mapping project must be identified. Its specifications, statement of requirements, its schedule of conditions must be sealed by a contract between an orderer and a cartographer.The objective of this presentation is to recall how a keyboard is neither a magic thought nor a magic wand. Clicking on it will never finalize our work without us, cartographers, but engages us to follow series of timeless execution process over the entire duration of the cartographic production, in anticipating each action.Our work consists in making every effort, by all the necessary technical and human means, to gather the knowledge of a subject (or several) to ‘Map-draw’ with the ultimate goal of returning this acquired knowledge to the readers. Their eye has to find at first glance the information sought. Indeed, the more beautiful and easier to grasp the map is, the more it will be consulted with pleasure.Through a range of cartographic memories, the following characteristic examples of out-of-standard cartographic productions will detail the pertinence of this meticulous cartographical articulation.
Published: 3 December 2021
by MDPI
Abstract:
Bumblebees are an important insect group occurring in different land ecosystems, but the number of these species has declined dramatically across Poland as well as in Europe in recent years. The fragmentation of bumblebee habitats influences the abundance and richness in community composition and trophic and competitive interactions. During the years 2003–2006 and 2017–2020, we studied the diversity and distribution of bumblebee species in two natural (boron-mixed Vaccinio-Piceetea and riparian forest Querco-Fagetea) and two semi-natural (segetal-ruderal Stellarietea mediae ruderal Artemisietea vulgaris) habitats in southern Poland. For that, we evaluated how habitats as well as local flowering communities influenced bumblebees’ abundance, richness, and community composition in 16 sites (which are located in four parks). Bumblebee communities responded to environmental factors in different ways according to the type of habitat. Vegetation factors were the most important drivers of bumblebee community structures. Forests showed the lowest bumblebee abundance, richness, and diversity, and the highest dominance levels of these parameters were found in the open ruderal-segetal habitats. The meadows from the Molinio arrhenatheretea class were characterized by bumblebee communities with a more complex structure. Species diversity was positively correlated with open ruderal-segetal habitats, and negatively with mixed forest cover, while abundance was positively correlated with forest cover. Studies like this are necessary to anticipate the impact of habitat fragmentation on bumblebee decline.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312788

Abstract:
Bold new approaches are urgently needed to overcome global health challenges. The proposed Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H) is intended to provide rapid health breakthroughs. While new technologies for earlier disease detection and more effective treatment are critical, we urge equal attention be given to the wider (physical, emotional, social, political, and economic) environmental ecosystems driving the non-communicable disease (NCD) crisis in the first place. This requires an integrated, cross-sectoral vision that spans the interwoven connections affecting health across the scales of people, places, and planet. This wider “exposome” perspective considers biopsychosocial factors that promote resilience and reduce vulnerabilities of individuals and communities over time—the many variables driving health disparities. Since life course health is strongly determined by early life environments, early interventions should be prioritized as a matter of effectiveness and social justice. Here, we explore the origins of the Advanced Research Project Agency and point to its potential to build integrated solutions, with wisdom and ethical value systems as a compass. Since the planned ARPA-H is anticipated to spawn international collaborations, the imagined concept is of relevance to a broad audience of researchers. With appropriate input, the quest for health equity through personalized, precision medicine while deconstructing unacceptable structural inequities may be accelerated.
, Yuan Angela Tan, , Debra Wong, Robert Parsley, Todd Sachs
JCO Oncology Practice; https://doi.org/10.1200/op.21.00339

Abstract:
PURPOSE: AccessHope is a program developed initially by City of Hope to provide remote subspecialist input on cancer care for patients as a supplemental benefit for specific payers or employers. The leading platform for this work has been an asynchronous model of review of medical records followed by a detailed assessment of past and current management along with discussion of potential future options in a report sent to the local oncologist. This summary describes an early period of development and growth of this service, focusing on cases of lung cancer, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Cases were primarily identified by a trigger list of cancer diagnoses that included non–small-cell lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. After medical records were obtained, a summary narrative was provided to a thoracic oncology specialist who wrote a case review sent to the local physician, followed by a direct discussion with the recipient. We focused on feasibility as measured by case volumes, the rates of concordance between the subspecialist reviewer with the local team, and cost savings from recommended changes, using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: From April 2019 to November 2020, 110 cases were reviewed: 55% male, median age 62.5 years (range, 33-92 years); 82% non–small-cell lung cancer (12% stage I or II, 16% stage III, and 57% stage IV), and 17% small-cell lung cancer (4% limited and 14% extensive). Median turnaround time for report send-out was 5.0 days. The review agreed with local management in 79 (72%) cases and disagreed in 31 (28%) cases; notably, specific additional recommendations were associated with evidence-based anticipated improvements in efficacy in 76 cases (69%) and improvement in potential for cure in 14 cases (13%). Recommendations leading to cost savings were identified in 14 cases (13%), translating to a projected cost savings of $19,062 (USD) per patient for the entire cohort of patient cases reviewed. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate the feasibility of completing a rapid turnaround of cases of lung cancer either patient-initiated for review or prospectively triggered by diagnosis and stage. This program of asynchronous second opinions identified evidence-based management changes affecting current treatment in 28% and potential improvements to improve care in 92% of patients, along with cost savings realized by eliminating low-value interventions.
Published: 3 December 2021
by MDPI
Sustainability, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313391

Abstract:
As awareness of the negative externalities created by ports increases, and the perceived local benefits decrease, ports must find new ways to improve the local noneconomic benefits they provide if they are to obtain local support. This global survey collected data from 51 ports in 26 countries. The results highlight a recognition by port authorities that ports face increasing pressure from local residents to reduce their negative impacts and that they should seek to improve the public perception towards the port by increasing local benefits. At present, port information and social media (81%), port events (67%) and education (63%) are the most adopted options. There is a lack of evidence that these measures are effective in improving local perceptions. Maritime museums and public access show a positive association with increasing local awareness of the benefits a port provides, despite their lower levels of adoption (45%). Port centres are the least adopted option at present (29%) and can be expected to increase significantly, with a 43% increase anticipated between numbers of current and expected future centres. Education (14%), public access (13%) and maritime museums (4.5%) also show increases in levels of interest. Maritime museums and public access should be pursued as proven, effective options for improving local perceptions of ports, whilst port centres may provide a new focal point for port-related social and cultural activities.
Biswajit Ruj, Bhaskar Bishayee, Rishya Prava Chatterjee, Ankita Mukherjee, Arup Saha, Jayato Nayak,
Published: 3 December 2021
Journal of Environmental Management, Volume 304; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2021.114143

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Zhuoxin Lu, Xiaoyuan Xu, Zheng Yan,
IEEE Transactions on Transportation Electrification, pp 1-1; https://doi.org/10.1109/tte.2021.3132533

Abstract:
Mobile energy storage systems (MSSs) manifest a significant potential for enhancing the reliable and economic operations of distribution systems with high photovoltaic (PV) penetrations. This paper proposes a robust and dynamic MSS scheduling method, which includes MSS mobility and its power management, in a coupled transportation and power distribution network. A rolling-horizon multi-stage robust optimization model with integer and linear decisions is proposed to schedule the MSS mobility and its charging and discharging strategies, considering uncertain traffic conditions, PV power output, and load demands, as well as non-anticipativity MSS operation constraints. The proposed model is transformed into a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) problem to achieve computational tractability based on mixed linear and binary decision rules and the duality theory. The proposed dynamic MSS scheduling method is tested on the augmented 33-bus and 123-bus distribution systems with actual solar irradiance, load and traffic data, and the simulation results are compared with those considering day-ahead MSS scheduling and stationary energy storage systems to verify the effectiveness of the proposed dynamic MSS operation.
Luis Enrique Echarte Alonso
SCIO: Revista de Filosofía pp 113-148; https://doi.org/10.46583/scio_2021.21.783

Abstract:
The neuroethics field emerged in the early 2000s in an effort to face important philosophical dilemmas and anticipate disruptive social changes linked to the use of neurotechnology (Safire, 2002). From very early on, this field grew out of two core issues, namely inquiries into the ethics of neuroscience –concerning the moral use of knowledge and technology– and inquiries into the neuroscience of ethics –on how new brain function evidence can change human self-understanding (Roskies 2002). Similarly, neurolaw is now on a parallel path with two main pillars as Chandler (2018) suggested, (1) “self-reflexive inquiry” (the neuroscience of law) and (2) “inquiry into the development and use of brain science and technologies” (the law of neuroscience). In this paper, I suggest that these two lines of research are still excessively disconnected from one another and, to support this claim, I analyze the three potential point-of-no-return risks that Aldous Huxley associated with technological challenges, namely centralization of power, bureaucratic alienation, and scientific idealism. In addition, I show how Huxley shifted analysis of technological problems from a focus on the rights of potential victims to the duties of potential aggressors. Finally, I argue that Aldous Huxley’s view on how to build a bridge that brings pillars 1) and 2) closer together also helps prevent the technological point-of-no-return. According to Huxley, the key is found in paying particular attention to understanding contemplative activity, reinforcing its role in the study of reality, and, eventually, returning the romantic gaze updated to academia.
Published: 3 December 2021
by MDPI
Journal of Clinical Medicine, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10235693

Abstract:
Placental abruption (PA) is a concern for maternal and neonatal morbidity. Adverse neonatal outcomes in the setting of PA include higher risk of prematurity. Placental pathologies include maternal vascular malperfusion (MVM), fetal vascular malperfusion (FVM), acute chorioamnionitis, and villitis of unknown etiology (VUE). We aimed to investigate how placental pathology contributes to acute neonatal outcome in PA. A retrospective cohort study of all placentas with PA were identified. Exposures were MVM, FVM, acute chorioamnionitis and VUE. The primary outcome was NICU admission and the secondary outcomes included adverse base deficit and Apgar scores, need for resuscitation, and small-for-gestational age. A total of 287 placentas were identified. There were 160 (59.9%) of placentas with PA alone vs 107 (40.1%) with PA and additional placental pathologies. Odds of NICU admission were more than two times higher in pregnancies with placental pathologies (OR = 2.37, 95% CI 1.28–4.52). These estimates were in large part mediated by prematurity and birthweight, indirect effect acting through prematurity was OR 1.79 (95% CI 1.12–2.75) and through birthweight OR 2.12 (95% CI 1.40–3.18). Odds of Apgar score ≤ 5 was more than four times higher among pregnancies with placental pathologies (OR = 4.56, 95% CI 1.28–21.26). Coexisting placental pathology may impact Apgar scores in pregnancies complicated by PA. This knowledge could be used by neonatal teams to mobilize resources in anticipation of the need for neonatal resuscitation.
Yebin Chen, Ding Ma, Shen Ying, Renzhong Guo, Zhigang Zhao, Zhilin Li
Published: 3 December 2021
Proceedings of the ICA, Volume 4, pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.5194/ica-proc-4-20-2021

Abstract:
Several new forms of maps and map-likes visualization have emerged owing to the advances in Information and Communication Technology (ICT). However, the current cartographic theories are insufficient to guide and support the applications of these new forms of maps and map-likes visualization. Specifically, these forms overstep the cartographic framework and challenge the cartographic theory. In this study, we term these new geovisualisation forms as Pan-maps, thereby proposing a framework to visualize Pan-maps based on time, space, attribute, and user variables. These variables can be divided into basic and compound variables, and a hierarchy among basic and compound variables using their interrelated composition relationships is established. Furthermore, we taken AR map as case study to verify the effectiveness of the proposed framework. The proposed framework is anticipated to provide theoretical and practical support for Pan-maps design and promote cartography development in the ICT era.
Robert M. Waterhouse, Anne-Françoise Adam-Blondon, Donat Agosti, Petr Baldrian, , Erwan Corre, , , , Christian Quast, et al.
Published: 3 December 2021
Abstract:
Threats to global biodiversity are increasingly recognised by scientists and the public as a critical challenge. Molecular sequencing technologies offer means to catalogue, explore, and monitor the richness and biogeography of life on Earth. However, exploiting their full potential requires tools that connect biodiversity infrastructures and resources. As a research infrastructure developing services and technical solutions that help integrate and coordinate life science resources across Europe, ELIXIR is a key player. To identify opportunities, highlight priorities, and aid strategic thinking, here we survey approaches by which molecular technologies help inform understanding of biodiversity. We detail example use cases to highlight how DNA sequencing is: resolving taxonomic issues; Increasing knowledge of marine biodiversity; helping understand how agriculture and biodiversity are critically linked; and playing an essential role in ecological studies. Together with examples of national biodiversity programmes, the use cases show where progress is being made but also highlight common challenges and opportunities for future enhancement of underlying technologies and services that connect molecular and wider biodiversity domains. Based on emerging themes, we propose key recommendations to guide future funding for biodiversity research: biodiversity and bioinformatic infrastructures need to collaborate closely and strategically; taxonomic efforts need to be aligned and harmonised across domains; metadata needs to be standardised and common data management approaches widely adopted; current approaches need to be scaled up dramatically to address the anticipated explosion of molecular data; bioinformatics support for biodiversity research needs to be enabled and sustained; training for end users of biodiversity research infrastructures needs to be prioritised; and community initiatives need to be proactive and focused on enabling solutions. For sequencing data to deliver their full potential they must be connected to knowledge: together, molecular sequence data collection initiatives and biodiversity research infrastructures can advance global efforts to prevent further decline of Earth’s biodiversity.
, , Patricio Colmegna, Jenny L. Diaz Castaneda,
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology; https://doi.org/10.1177/19322968211059159

Abstract:
Introduction: Hyperglycemia following meals is a recurring challenge for people with type 1 diabetes, and even the most advanced available automated systems currently require manual input of carbohydrate amounts. To progress toward fully automated systems, we present a novel control system that can automatically deliver priming boluses and/or anticipate eating behaviors to improve postprandial full closed-loop control. Methods: A model predictive control (MPC) system was enhanced by an automated bolus system reacting to early glucose rise and/or a multistage MPC (MS-MPC) framework to anticipate historical patterns. Priming was achieved by detecting large glycemic disturbances, such as meals, and delivering a fraction of the patient’s total daily insulin (TDI) modulated by the disturbance’s likelihood (bolus priming system [BPS]). In the anticipatory module, glycemic disturbance profiles were generated from historical data using clustering to group days with similar behaviors; the probability of each cluster is then evaluated at every controller step and informs the MS-MPC framework to anticipate each profile. We tested four configurations: MPC, MPC + BPS, MS-MPC, and MS-MPC + BPS in simulation to contrast the effect of each controller module. Results: Postprandial time in range was highest for MS-MPC + BPS: 60.73 ± 25.39%, but improved with each module: MPC + BPS: 56.95±25.83 and MS-MPC: 54.83 ± 26.00%, compared with MPC: 51.79 ± 26.12%. Exposure to hypoglycemia was maintained for all controllers (time below 70 mg/dL <0.5%), and improvement came primarily from a reduction in postprandial time above range (MS-MPC + BPS: 39.10 ± 25.32%, MPC + BPS: 42.99 ± 25.81%, MS-MPC: 45.09 ± 25.96%, MPC: 48.18 ± 26.09%). Conclusions: The BPS and anticipatory disturbance profiles improved blood glucose control and were most efficient when combined.
M. Dustin Boone, Hung-Mo Lin, Xiaoyu Liu, Jong Kim, Mary Sano, Mark G. Baxter, Frederick E. Sieber,
Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10877-021-00783-0

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Meghan G. Sahakian, Eric D. Vugrin
Resilient Control Architectures and Power Systems pp 275-284; https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119660446.ch18

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Zichun Lu,
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, Volume 194, pp 1-21; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-021-09650-6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Aidan Day
Published: 3 December 2021
Robert Browning pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315001944-1

Abstract:
One of the best known of Browning’s poems - ‘ “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came” first published in 1855 when Browning was 43 - is also one of his most enigmatic. In her Handbook to the Works of Robert Browning Mrs Sutherland Orr summarized the poem as the story of ‘a brave knight performing a pilgrimage, in which hitherto all who attempted it have failed’ (Orr 1896: p. 273). Below the ‘surface’ of the romance narrative, however, Mrs Orr found awkward ‘discrepancies’: ‘as [Childe Roland] describes the country through which he passes, it becomes clear that halfits horrors are created by his own heated imagination. . . . We can connect no idea of definite pursuit or attainment with a series of facts so dreamlike and so disjointed: still less extract from it a definite moral’ (Orr 1896: pp. 273-4). The ‘logic’ of the narrative progression in ‘“Childe Roland”’ is indeed less that of action in the external world than of the inner movement, the fluxes and refluxes, of the mind. Representation of literal action and landscape is transmuted throughout the poem into a figuring of psychological process. Thus, for example, in the ninth stanza, as Roland tells how at a certain stage of his journey he stepped from a road onto a surrounding plain, the road scene is immediately displaced in a manner that suggests the mysteriously arbitrary dynamic of reverie or dream-sequence: no sooner was I fairly found Pledged to the plain, after a pace or two, Than, pausing to throw backward a last view 2O’er the safe road, ’twas gone; grey plain all round: Nothing but plain to the horizon’s bound. Again, in stanza twenty-one, a description of the action of fording a river is collapsed, without any explicit allegorical frame, into a drama of disturbing psychological implication: - It may have been a water-rat I speared, But, ugh! it sounded like a baby’s shriek. For the modern reader, used to the fragmentary and alogical effects of much twentieth-century Modernist poetry, the dislocations and incertitudes of Browning’s narrative may appear less than surprising; even, perhaps, familiar. But it is not only that we may recognize in Browning’s work a highly individual anticipation of some aspects of Modernist poetic procedure. The ‘discrepancies’ in ‘ “Childe Roland” ’ — those features of the poem that seem most distinctively Browningesque — are distinctions that at once signal Browning’s place within a larger ideological context.
Published: 2 December 2021
by MDPI
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, Volume 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9121371

Abstract:
With a plan to achieve a target of 5.7 GW offshore wind power capacity in 2025, Taiwan anticipates building a 36-billion USD industry, which makes Taiwan a center of attention in the global marketplace of civil engineering construction. Aimed at Taiwan’s underwater foundations industries, this study is the first to develop an investment evaluation model (IEM) by applying FPR to obtain risk factor weights and calculate the overall investment risk value with a numerical scoring method. In a context where no precedent exists for reference, this study provides auxiliary and supportive tools to help builders to make the decision, based on objective indicators, whether to undertake an investment. To date, no research has been conducted to introduce a reasonable mathematical model that discusses the issue of partner selection in the field of offshore wind power. This study is the first paper to construct a SWARA-FTOPSIS partner selection model, which enables underwater foundations builders to take specific Taiwanese characteristics into account in their selection of the best partners to meet transportation, construction, and installation requirements. Finally, the study uses the case of the Taipower Offshore Wind Power Project (2nd phase) to verify the feasibility of this model.
Brent D. Slife, Stephen C. Yanchar, Frank C. Richardson
Routledge International Handbook of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology; https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003036517

Abstract:
Routledge International Handbook of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology is a compilation of works by leading scholars in theoretical and philosophical psychology that offers critical analyses of, and alternatives to, current theories and philosophies typically taken for granted in mainstream psychology. Within their chapters, the expert authors briefly describe accepted theories and philosophies before explaining their problems and exploring fresh, new ideas for practice and research. These alternative ideas offer thought-provoking ways of reinterpreting many aspects of human existence often studied by psychologists. Organized into five sections, the volume covers the discipline of psychology in general, various subdisciplines (e.g., positive psychology and human development), concepts of self and identity as well as research and practice. Together the chapters present a set of alternative ideas that have the potential to take the field of psychology in fruitful directions not anticipated in more traditional theory and research. This handbook will be a valuable resource for students and scholars of the theory, assumptions, and history of psychology.
, Stefan Langner, Jianchang Wu, Christian Kupfer, Larry Lüer, Wei Meng, Baolin Zhao, Chao Liu, Manuel Daum, Andres Osvet, et al.
ACS Energy Letters pp 70-77; https://doi.org/10.1021/acsenergylett.1c02081

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 2 December 2021
Frontiers in Robotics and AI, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3389/frobt.2021.769349

Abstract:
In recent years, the governance of robotic technologies has become an important topic in policy-making contexts. The many potential applications and roles of robots in combination with steady advances in their uptake within society are expected to cause various unprecedented issues, which in many cases will increase the demand for new policy measures. One of the major issues is the way in which societies will address potential changes in the moral and legal status of autonomous social robots. Robot standing is an important concept that aims to understand and elaborate on such changes in robots’ status. This paper explores the concept of robot standing as a useful idea that can assist in the anticipatory governance of social robots. However, at the same time, the concept necessarily involves forms of speculative thinking, as it is anticipating a future that has not yet fully arrived. This paper elaborates on how such speculative engagement with the potential of technology represents an important point of discussion in the critical study of technology more generally. The paper then situates social robotics in the context of anticipatory technology governance by emphasizing the idea that robots are currently in the process of becoming constituted as objects of governance. Subsequently, it explains how specifically a speculative concept like robot standing can be of value in this process.
Roney Eloy Lima, Paulo Carteri Coradi, Marcela Trojahn Nunes, Sabrina Dalla Corte Bellochio, Newiton Da Silva Timm, Camila Fontoura Nunes, Letícia De Oliveira Carneiro, Paulo Eduardo Teodoro, Carlos Campabadal
Published: 2 December 2021
Scientific Reports, Volume 11, pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-02724-y

Abstract:
Anticipating the harvest period of soybean crops can impact on the post-harvest processes. This study aimed to evaluate early soybean harvest associated drying and storage conditions on the physicochemical soybean quality using of mathematical modeling and multivariate analysis. The soybeans were harvested with a moisture content of 18 and 23% (d.b.) and subjected to drying in a continuous dryer at 80, 100, and 120 °C. The drying kinetics and volumetric shrinkage modeling were evaluated. Posteriorly, the soybean was stored at different packages and temperatures for 8 months to evaluate the physicochemical properties. After standardizing the variables, the data were submitted to cluster analysis. For this, we use Euclidean distance and Ward's hierarchical method. Then defining the groups, we constructed a graph containing the dispersion of the values of the variables and their respective Pearson correlations for each group. The mathematical models proved suitable to describe the drying kinetics. Besides, the effective diffusivity obtained was 4.9 × 10–10 m2 s−1 promoting a volumetric shrinkage of the grains and influencing the reduction of physicochemical quality. It was observed that soybean harvested at 23% moisture, dried at 80 °C, and stored at a temperature below 23 °C maintained its oil content (25.89%), crude protein (35.69%), and lipid acidity (5.54 mL). In addition, it is to note that these correlations' magnitude was substantially more remarkable for the treatments allocated to the G2 group. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity was negatively correlated with all the physicochemical variables evaluated. Besides this, the correlation between crude protein and oil yield was positive and of high magnitude, regardless of the group formed. In conclusion, the early harvest of soybeans reduced losses in the field and increased the grain flow on the storage units. The low-temperature drying and the use of packaging technology close to environmental temperatures conserved the grain quality.
, Gareth Ambler, Bina Shah, Norman R Williams, Daniel Martin, Brian R Davidson, Michael Spiro
Published: 2 December 2021
by BMJ
Abstract:
Introduction: Liver transplantation is a complex operation that can provide significant improvements in quality of life and survival to the recipients. However, serious complications are common and include major haemorrhage, hypotension and renal failure. Blood transfusion and the development of acute kidney injury lead to both short-term and long-term poor patient outcomes, including an increased risk of death, graft failure, length of stay and reduced quality of life. Octreotide may reduce the incidence of renal dysfunction, perioperative haemorrhage and enhance intraoperative blood pressure. However, octreotide does have risks, including resistant bradycardia, hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia and QT prolongation. Hence, a randomised controlled trial of octreotide during liver transplantation is needed to determine the cost-efficacy and safety of its use; this study represents a feasibility study prior to this trial.Methods and analysis: We describe a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled feasibility study of continuous infusion of octreotide during liver transplantation surgery. We will recruit 30 adult patients at two liver transplant centres. A blinded infusion during surgery will be administered in a 2:1 ratio of octreotide:placebo. The primary outcomes will determine the feasibility of this study design. These include the recruitment ratio, correct administration of blinded study intervention, adverse event rates, patient and clinician enrolment refusal and completion of data collection. Secondary outcome measures of efficacy and safety will help shape future trials by assessing potential primary outcome measures and monitoring safety end points. No formal statistical tests are planned. This manuscript represents study protocol number 1.3, dated 2 June 2021.Ethics and dissemination: This study has received Research Ethics Committee approval. The main study outcomes will be submitted to an open-access journal.Trial sponsor: The Joint Research Office, University College London, UK.Neither the sponsor nor the funder have any role in study design, collection, management, analysis and interpretation of data, writing of the study report or the decision to submit the report for publication.Trial registration: The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04941911) with recruitment due to start in August 2021 with anticipated completion in July 2022.Clinical trials unit: Surgical and Interventional Group, Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London.
Shiao Li Oei, Thomas Rieser, Sarah Becker, Jessica Groß, Harald Matthes, ,
Published: 2 December 2021
Trials, Volume 22, pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-021-05869-3

Abstract:
Background: The majority of breast cancer patients suffer from persistent impairments after completion of their primary oncological therapy. Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in particular is a multidimensional syndrome having a profound negative impact on the quality of life. To counter CRF symptoms, physical activities are suggested as first-line interventions, mind-body therapies have been shown to be effective, and music therapy can also reduce anxiety and stress in breast cancer patients. Tango therapy that combines various elements can have an impact on physical, psychological, and cognitive abilities and could therefore have a beneficial effect on breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a 6-week tango module is suited as a therapeutic approach for people after primary breast cancer therapy to favorably influence their quality of life, especially CRF levels. Methods: Sixty patients with a diagnosis for stage I–III breast cancer 12–48 months before enrollment and with CRF (age > 18) will be recruited and randomized 1:1 to a tango or a waiting-list group. Movement concepts using elements of Argentine tango (self-awareness, musical and spatial perception, self-perception, playfulness, shared experience) will be examined with the participants during six consecutive weekly 1-h tango sessions. The primary outcome will be the improvement of CRF (German version of the Cancer Fatigue Scale), and the secondary outcomes will be the improvement in sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and quality of life (EORTC-QLQ-C30). Patient-reported outcomes will be measured at baseline and 6 weeks later; follow-up will be performed 6, 12, and 24 months after baseline. An evaluation will be performed by means of descriptive data analyses. Discussion: Argentine tango, as a music-based movement therapy, can influence different skills and may improve several outcomes. The therapeutic use of Argentine tango in the care of breast cancer patients has not yet been reported. It is anticipated that participants receiving the tango module will have improved CRF, sleep, and quality of life scores compared to a waitlist control. Trial registration: German Clinical Trials Registry (DRKS) DRKS00021601. Retrospectively registered on 21 August 2020
Sarvin Ghasemi, , Forough Farsad, Maryam Robati, Parvin Farshchi
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, Volume 193, pp 1-27; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-021-09627-5

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Vanessa Nicholas
Published: 2 December 2021
Design and Heritage pp 185-196; https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003096146-17

Abstract:
The subject of this chapter is a cotton quilt made by Betsy Adams Dodge (1829-1911) during last quarter of the nineteenth century in Mainsville, Ontario, which features 20 pieced maple leaves with applique stems. While Dodge’s quilt anticipates the Canadian flag and might be understood simply as an early example of Canadiana, there is reason to believe that she used the maple leaf block pattern to express her personal and political identification with the sugar maple and its environment, which spans Canada’s southeast, New England, and the Great Lakes states. The maple leaf block pattern figures in quilts and quilt histories produced by both Canadian and American women living within this region, suggesting that the maple leaf emblem has an ecological meaning as well as an iconographic one. This would have been particularly true in late nineteenth-century Ontario, where conservationist sentiment mounted in response to deforestation. It may be that Dodge’s quilt corresponds to the shift in attitude towards Ontario’s trees and forests that led to the establishment of provincial parks in the early 1890s. Rather than reinforcing the problematic association of women with nature, this case study suggests that the homecrafts made by Victorian Canadian women represent the complex and often contradictory views of the natural world that were typical of the time.
, Jessica Bogach, Wendy Johnston, Deanna Ng,
Published: 2 December 2021
Abstract:
Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, patients attending ambulatory clinics at cancer centers in Ontario completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) at each visit. At our center, completion was via touch pad, with assistance by clinic volunteers. As of March 2020, clinic appointments were conducted virtually when possible and touch pads removed. We anticipated a negative impact on the collection of patient-reported outcomes (PROs), and the recognition of severe symptoms. Methods: We performed a prospective cross-sectional cohort study to test the feasibility of remote ESAS completion by patients with appointments at a weekly surgical oncology clinic. Patients in the initial study cohort were asked to complete and return the ESAS virtually(V). Given low completion rates, the ensuing cohort was asked to complete a hard-copy(HC) ESAS. For the final cohort, we used an adaptive approach, providing remote, personal mentorship by a member of the care team to support virtual electronic ESAS completion (virtual-mentored(VM) cohort).Results: Between May-July 2020, a total of 174 patient encounters were included in the study. For the V cohort, 20/46 patients (44%) successfully completed and returned the electronic ESAS, compared to 49/50 (98%) for the HC cohort. For the VM cohort (n=78), the completion rate was 74%. Questionnaire completion was not predicted by age, sex or tumor site, although patients who completed the ESAS were more likely to be in active management rather than surveillance(p=0.04). Of all completed forms, 42% revealed a depression score ³2, and 27% an anxiety score ³4. Conclusions: We identified significant barriers to the virtual completion of ESAS forms, with a lack of predictive variables. The severe degree of psychological distress reported by ~50% of respondents demonstrates the need for ongoing regular collection/review of these data. Innovative solutions are required to overcome barriers to virtual collection of PROs.
Julian Bollig, Stefan Vogl
Published: 2 December 2021
Abstract:
We explore the impact of non-perturbative effects, namely Sommerfeld enhancement and bound state formation, on the cosmological production of non-thermal dark matter. For this purpose, we focus on a class of simplified models with t-channel mediators. These naturally combine the requirements for large corrections in the early Universe, i.e. beyond the Standard Model states with long range interactions, with a sizable new physics production cross section at the LHC. We find that the dark matter yield of the superWIMP mechanism is suppressed considerably due to the non-perturbative effects under consideration. This leads to a significant shift in the cosmologically preferred parameter space of non-thermal dark matter in these models. We also revisit the implications of LHC bounds on long-lived particles associated with non-thermal dark matter and find that testing this scenario at the LHC is a bigger challenge than previously anticipated.
Xiaowei Liu, , Li Wang, Zhikun Huang, Fazal Haq, Lisong Teng, Meijin Jin, Binbin Ding
Published: 2 December 2021
Advanced Materials Interfaces; https://doi.org/10.1002/admi.202101038

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 2 December 2021
Handbuch Anerkennung pp 137-141; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-19558-8_22

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Melissa Lukings, Arash Habibi Lashkari
Understanding Cybersecurity Law and Digital Privacy pp 137-177; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-88704-9_5

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, Martha M. Farella, Russell L. Scott, David J. P. Moore, Guillermo E. Ponce-Campos, , Natasha MacBean, Marcy E. Litvak, David D. Breshears
Communications Earth & Environment, Volume 2, pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-021-00308-2

Abstract:
Dryland ecosystems are dominant influences on both the trend and interannual variability of the terrestrial carbon sink. Despite their importance, dryland carbon dynamics are not well-characterized by current models. Here, we present DryFlux, an upscaled product built on a dense network of eddy covariance sites in the North American Southwest. To estimate dryland gross primary productivity, we fuse in situ fluxes with remote sensing and meteorological observations using machine learning. DryFlux explicitly accounts for intra-annual variation in water availability, and accurately predicts interannual and seasonal variability in carbon uptake. Applying DryFlux globally indicates existing products may underestimate impacts of large-scale climate patterns on the interannual variability of dryland carbon uptake. We anticipate DryFlux will be an improved benchmark for earth system models in drylands, and prompt a more sensitive accounting of water limitation on the carbon cycle.
Marc Helmold
Published: 2 December 2021
Management for Professionals pp 123-130; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77661-9_11

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Marc Helmold
Published: 2 December 2021
Management for Professionals pp 97-111; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-77661-9_9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Wendi Ma, Wenying Dong, Shanshan Zhao, Tianhui Du, Yilong Wang, Jihang Yao, Zhewen Liu, Dahui Sun,
Published: 2 December 2021
Materials Science and Engineering: C; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2021.112584

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Juan Jose Gutierrez Cuevas, Fang Fang Chen Chen, Laura Santos Larregola, Alberto Manzanares Briega, Manuel Linares
Published: 2 December 2021
Abstract:
Purpose: to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in primary care and to analyze the predictive role of different risk factors on prognosis, especially living conditions. Methods: Retrospective longitudinal observational retrospective study by reviewing medical records from a primary care center since March 1 to April 30, 2020. Case definition of confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, sociodemographic data, clinical characteristics, comorbidity and living conditions were collected. The statistical analysis consisted in description of the sample, comparison of prognosis groups and analysis of prognostic factors. Results. A sample of 70 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection was obtained, with comorbidity mainly related to arterial hypertension, overweight/obesity, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and chronic pulmonary pathology. Pneumonia was present in 66%. Exitus occurred in 14% of the sample. Factors associated with mortality were advanced age (84 vs 55; p<0.0001), arterial hypertension (78% vs 41%; p=0.040), asthma-COPD (56% vs 13%; p=0.008) and atrial fibrillation (56% vs 5%; p=0.001). Conclusions. The study reflects the clinical practice of a primary care center. This kind of studies are essential to strengthen and reorganize the Health System and to try to anticipate the medium- to long-term consequences of COVID-19 on global health.
Mandy Nicholson, David S. Jones
Published: 2 December 2021
Design and Heritage pp 69-82; https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003096146-7

Abstract:
Country provides everything the Wadawurrung need for their life, informing and enabling the curation of their lands and waters, feeding humans and animals alike, offering language and nomenclature and providing the ‘operational’ structure to their society today and into the future in anticipation of the return of their Creation Beings. Wadawurrung man Gareth Powell has explained that it is all a ‘design’, a ‘masterplan’. [Designing and] constructing ‘identity and belonging’ in First Nation’s (Aboriginal) Australia comprises the act, art and narration and involves multi-genre-modes of navigating and empowering respectful Indigenous design (and this living heritage) in a complex realm. In part, it is substantially stifled by Australian contemporary history and colonisation fault lines enveloped in undiscussed topics of sovereignty, dispossession and dislocation and biological and forceful invasion. Therefore the ‘art’ of designing in this realm comes with a huge truckload of cultural baggage even before one attempts to navigate concepts of respect, identity, Country, language and relational ontologies. This chapter surveys some of these key variables, in the Australian context, with reference to several recent exemplars, especially unravelling the Mirambeek Murrup/North Gardens project on Wadawurrung Country, offering points of guidance to the reader and practitioner.
, Suresh Naik
Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration; https://doi.org/10.1108/apjba-11-2020-0405

Abstract:
Purpose: In any stock market, volatility is a significant factor in strengthening their asset pricing. The upsurge in volatility in the stock market can activate and bring changes in the financial risk. According to financial conventional theory, the stakeholders (investors) are selected to be balanced and variations in pertinent risk are also to be anticipated due to the outcome of the drive-in basic factors in Indian stock markets. The hypothesis shows that there are actions in systematic and unsystematic risks that are determined by volatility. It is allied to sentiment-driven in the trader movement.Design/methodology/approach: The paper used the methodology of generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity-in mean GARCH-M and exponential GARCH-M (E-GARCH-M) methods on the Indian stock market. The data have been covered from 2000 to 2019.Findings: Finally, the study suggests that due to the unfitness of the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), the selection has enhanced with sentiment is an important risk factor.Practical implications: The investor sentiment and stock return volatility statement are established by using the investor sentiment amalgamated stock market index built.Originality/value: The outcome of the study shows that there is an important association between stakeholder (investor) sentiment and stock return, in case of volatility behavioural finance can significantly explain the behaviour of stock returns on the Indian Stock Exchange.
Sunanta Tangnitipong, Supat Jiranusornkul,
European Journal of Translational and Clinical Medicine, Volume 4, pp 101-106; https://doi.org/10.31373/ejtcm/142816

Abstract:
Herbal medications are gaining popularity in many countries. Although most can be used without any problem, serious toxicities do occur. Adverse events can be anticipated when herbal medications are used at excessive dose, long-term, for non-approved indications or by patients who are using multiple medications. Adverse events should be anticipated when these herbal medications with identified pharmacological effects or toxic ingredients are used. Healthcare professionals need to discuss or advise patients regarding their use. Physician-obtained medication histories towards specific herbal product use could provide relevant pharmacologic information and uncover cases of adverse events or toxicity from the used herbal products.
Carolyn Strand Norman, J. Matthew Sarji, Thomas Bowe Hansen
Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations pp 109-118; https://doi.org/10.1108/s1085-462220210000025007

Abstract:
Changes in the accounting profession predictably impact higher education, including the sudden, unexpected shift from working in an office to working remotely. The Covid-19 global pandemic forced our accounting department to pivot all courses to a remote teaching and learning environment, which represented a very turbulent environment for our faculty and students. Since we had no clarity regarding the extent or duration of this change, we decided to collect our experiences that semester to share the practices that we tried that worked well and to also capture the practices that did not work as well as anticipated. As a result, we were able to leverage our dynamic capabilities to work on continuous improvement in the areas of engagement and innovation to have a positive impact on our teaching and student learning.
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