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(searched for: An Examination of Barriers of Criminal Information Sharing Between Law Enforcement Agencies and Their Effect in Crimes Management in Nairobi County, Kenya)
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L. W. Kamau, W. Mwangi, P. Mwaeke
European Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, Volume 1, pp 11-17; https://doi.org/10.24018/ejsocial.2021.1.5.121

Abstract:
The paper examined barriers of criminal information sharing between law enforcement agencies and their effect in crimes management in Nairobi County, Kenya, using data from an MA Thesis. This study was guided by four objectives; to examine the types of criminal information that is shared among law enforcement agencies; to assess the individual, organizational and technological barriers that hinders sharing of criminal information among law enforcement agencies in Nairobi County, Kenya. This study was guided by Social Exchange Theory as propounded by Homans in (1958). This study adopted a qualitative study design and non-probabilistic sample design paradigms. The main method of data collection was the interview. Interview schedule and key informants guide were used to collect data. A sample comprised of 47 law enforcement officers purposively selected from Directorate of criminal Investigation (DCI) Operation wing and the Kenya Police Service Headquarters operation wing. In addition, 10 Key informants were also purposively selected and interviewed to inform the study. Both individual barriers, organizational and technological barriers affected criminal information sharing among law enforcement agencies. Major individual barrier was competition for credit between the agencies in achieving positive outcomes which was perceived to have a backlash on security operations. Other individual barriers included the deeply entrenched culture of secrecy and the need-to-know rather than the need to share policy. Major organizational barriers include Mistrust of other organizations (89.1%), Organizational culture such as culture of secrecy (83.2%). Major technological barriers included both intra and inter-information technological gaps exacerbated by wanting levels of information technology skills. The barriers were perceived to cause 'linkage blindness,' where the information available in one agency is not available with other law enforcement agencies affecting remarkable achievement of outcomes. As a policy measure, the study recommended speedy removal of criminal information barriers at all levels and fast mitigation on both intra and inter-organizational information technological skill gaps. The deeply entrenched culture of secrecy and the need-to-know rather than the need to share information policy should further be re-visited and dealt with. Finally, there is an urgent need for National-wide Criminal Information Management System with certain rights for all law enforcement agencies. The use of a database will reduce the technological barrier since criminal information will be made accessible to all the agencies
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