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Karasu Mehdi, Karaca Özkan, Kobat Mehmet Ali, Kıvrak Tarık, Ipek Mehmet Ikbal
Archives of Vascular Medicine, Volume 6, pp 001-004; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.avm.1001015

Abstract:
Background: Doubts about the safety of sexual activity are common among cardiac patients and physicians alike, and are often neglected during routine checkups or on discharge from the hospital following a cardiac event or invasive procedure. Although it varies from society to society, it is considered taboo by most patients, so it is reluctant to ask the doctor about sexual activity. Doctors, on the other hand, remain silent due to the lack of clear information about the effect of sexual activity on coronary artery diseases or the presence of doubts. It is ultimately set aside by professionals and their patients. The patient does not ask and the doctor does not answer. This study, it was aimed to investigate the effect of the frequency of sexual intercourse on coronary artery disease. Methods: After applying the exclusion criteria, the remaining 180 patients were included in the study. A self-administered survey was applied to the patients before coronary angiography and patients were assessed according to the presence of additional diseases, their demographic characteristics, and the frequency of sexual intercourse. Two experienced physicians evaluated the angiographic results. Firstly Patients were grouped as 90 patients with normal coronary anatomy and 90 patients with coronary artery disease. After this, Coronary artery disease severity was evaluated according to syntax score. Results: The mean age of the patients was 58 ± 12.5 years. The distribution of age is not reasonable. According to gender, the female/male ratio the proportion of men was higher in patients with coronary artery disease. İncidence of normal coronary anatomy increased as the frequency of sexual intercourse increased. P - value was 0.037 and the result was statistically significant. The frequency of sexual intercourse was found to be 4.2/per month. The relationship between the Syntax score and frequency of sexual intercourse was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion: As a result of the study, it was seen that patients with more frequent sexual intercourse had more normal coronary artery anatomy, and those with coronary artery disease had single coronary artery disease than multiple vascular disorders. it was concluded that the incidence of coronary artery disease and coronary artery disease severity decreased as the frequency of sexual intercourse increased. Sexual intercourse might be a preventive factor in the development of coronary artery disease.
Published: 25 June 2016
World Neurosurgery, Volume 93, pp 413-420; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2016.06.071

Abstract:
From Luessenhop's early clinical experience until the present day, experimental methods have been introduced to make progress in endovascular neurosurgery. A personal historical narrative, spanning the 1980s to 2010s, with a review of past opportunities, current problems, and future perspectives. Although the technology has significantly improved, our clinical culture remains a barrier to methodologically sound and safe innovative care and progress. We must learn how to safely practice endovascular neurosurgery in the presence of uncertainty and verify patient outcomes in real time.
Miguel Bertelli Ramos, Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira, Mark C. Preul, Robert F. Spetzler,
Published: 15 June 2019
World Neurosurgery, Volume 129, pp 261-268; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2019.06.048

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, P.E. Burrows
Published: 1 October 2006
American Journal of Neuroradiology, Volume 27, pp 1927-1929

Abstract:
SUMMARY: Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are a rare feature of Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS). Palencia et al reported a case of intracranial arteriovenous malformation in a child with BRRS in a Spanish journal in 1986. However, the occurrence of dural AVM in a patient with BRRS has not since been addressed in the literature. Advancements in imaging and therapeutic embolization, and the ability now to screen for phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) mutations allow us to detect and manage these patients sooner. Early detection of intracranial AVMs is necessary because of the risk for progression to venous ischemia and resultant neurologic damage. We present the case of a child with headaches and periorbital venous congestion due to a dural AVM with bilateral venous outflow occlusion who was treated with multiple embolizations, now with interval remission of headache symptoms.
Takaharu Hatano, , Ayaka Deguchi, Heishiro Fujikawa, Shusaku Maeda
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.1097/gox.0000000000002186

Abstract:
The treatment for arterial venous malformation (AVM) of functionally and aesthetically important parts such as the hand is considered to be challenging.AVM existed in the right forearm and the thenar region of 55-year-old man. Combined method with free omentum flap and split-thickness skin flap was performed for hand reconstruction after radical excision of an AVM. The postoperative course was good. Seven years have passed postoperatively, and functional but aesthetical results are satisfying with no recurrence. Our operative procedure with complete resection of AVM with placement of the free omental flap to the resected area and placing back the original skin as a skin graft is considered to be an ideal curative surgical treatment of the AVM. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.
Surgical Neurology International, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.25259/sni_760_2020

Abstract:
Background: Radiosurgery is an effective, alternative treatment modality in managing patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The present study aims to highlight the scholarly impact of the top-100 most cited articles on the radiosurgical management of AVMs. Methods: A title-specific search using the keyword “arteriovenous malformation” was conducted in the Scopus database. The outcome of the search was rearranged based on the citations count. Articles were categorized into four entities; clinical, gamma knife radiosurgery, linear accelerator (LINAC) radiosurgery, and proton beam radiosurgery. The exclusion criteria were applied to spinal or non-intracranial AVM, conference papers, non-English articles predominantly discussing the endovascular or microsurgical management. Results: The top-100 articles on the radiosurgical management of AVM were published between 1972 and 2016. Approximately one-third of the publications were produced between 1995 and 2000. The average citations per year for all papers were seven. The most-studied entity was pertinent to the clinical application of gamma knife radiosurgery in AVM (68%). The United States was the most active country in studying the radiosurgical application in AVM. The Journal of Neurosurgery published approximately one-third of the most-cited articles in the list. The top-3 most contributing authors, publishing 80% of articles in the list, were Lunsford et al. Conclusion: The radiosurgical management of AVMs evolved significantly throughout the years. Identifications of the publication trends facilitate the acquisition of evidence-based articles for authors investigating various radiosurgical techniques in the treatment of AVMs.
, Mike Male
Published: 1 November 2011
Journal of Consumer Marketing, Volume 28, pp 484-490; https://doi.org/10.1108/07363761111181464

Abstract:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss the main reasons driving the anti-vaccination movement (AVM) and relate similarities and differences of the AVM with the anti-consumption of other products. Design/methodology/approach – The paper conducts thematic analysis of various online sources, including medical journals, blogs, science articles and business/social science databases. Findings – First, the paper outlines the main themes (religion, freedom of choice, risk, and uncertainty) driving the anti-consumption of vaccines. Second, it explains why the AVM is a unique and paradoxical form of anti-consumption. Third, although much anti-consumption behaviour is motivated by the belief that rejecting certain acts of consumption may be beneficial to society, the paper uses the AVM to show that not all anti-consumption behavior has clear-cut benefits for society. Research limitations/implications – While this is predominately a conceptual paper, a commentary on the AVM has never been attempted by business scholars. This is surprising since business scholars are able to bring a more impartial viewpoint to the debate than both the medical establishment and proponents of natural therapy. As this paper is not associated with medical interests, nor the AVM, the focus is on the welfare of consumers and as such, a more detached perspective may be useful in this controversial area. Practical implications – Since the AVM debate is filled with much uncertainty, the paper recommends a more balanced/respectful approach by the medical community, pro-vaccinators and the AVM. Originality/value – Unlike previous work in the area, this research intersects commercial, societal, and medical interests. It also highlights AVM as an interesting case where large groups of people sharing similar anti-consumption behaviours are actually incompatible with one another.
Amira Alolyani, Horia Alotaibi, May Adel AlHamid, Faisal Alabbas,
The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology, Volume 4, pp 092-095; https://doi.org/10.4103/ajir.ajir_11_20

Abstract:
Background: Cerebrovascular malformations are encountered frequently in clinical practice, but not much is known about the pattern of publication in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries. We aim to evaluate the status and pattern of publications of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and cavernomas in the MENA. Materials and Methods: PubMed database was searched for publications on cerebral AVM and cavernomas in the MENA between 2009 and 2019. Results: We found only 94 publications in the MENA region out of 31,333 publications pertaining to AVMs (0.3%). The highest publishing country was Turkey, with 50 (53.1%) studies. The case report was the study design used most by authors with 59 (62.7%) studies. The majority of publications were by neurosurgeons with 42 of 94 (42.4%) papers. European journals ranked first in the number of published articles with 42 of 94 (46.1%) articles. Conclusions: We found a limited number of publications on cerebral AVMs and cavernomas by MENA countries in the past decade. Research support and national/regional registries are important factors to improve the academic output on AVMs and cavernomas in the MENA region.
, G.K. Ricciardi, E. Piovan, P. Zampieri, A. Pasqualin, A. Nicolato, R. Foroni, F. Sala, L. Bassi, M. Gerosa
Published: 1 September 2009
Interventional Neuroradiology, Volume 15, pp 266-274; https://doi.org/10.1177/159101990901500303

Abstract:
The most important issue when dealing with a patient with a brain AVM is the decision whether to treat or not. Only after this decision has been made, taking into consideration a number of factors depending on both the patient and the specific type of AVM, can the best option for treatment be chosen. An operative classification of brain AVMs, previously adopted in the Department of Neuroradiology and Neurosurgery of Verona (Italy) and published in this journal, was subjected to validation in a consecutive group of 104 patients clinically followed for at least three years after completion of treatment. This classification, slightly modified from the original version concerning the importance of some specific items, allowed us to assess the indication to treat in each case, whatever type of treatment was offered to the patient.
Michael G. Hennerici
Published: 10 September 2019
Cerebrovascular Diseases, Volume 47, pp 205-206; https://doi.org/10.1159/000502991

Abstract:
In this journal, several authors discuss current issues of acute stroke management and stroke prevention compared with recently published trials of still uncertain clinical significance, for example, what impact on clinical practice has occurred from the large exciting ARUBA study. Reynolds et al. [1] from New York, USA, present their analysis for intervention for brain arteriovenous malformation before and after the publication of ARUBA in the United States (Unruptured Brain Arteriovenous Malformations – AVM; ARUBA). Based on a Nationwide Readmissions Database to assess trends in interventional AVM management in patients ≥18 years of age from 2010 through 2015, they did not observe a significant U.S. population-level change in unruptured brain AVM intervention rates before versus after ARUBA (p = 0.59). The incidence of AVM intervention ranged from 8.0 to 9.2 per 10 million U.S. residents before the trial publication to 7.7–8.3 per 10 million afterwards. The authors discussed carefully the pros and cons of their observation and needs for further investigations.
S.B. Kerchelaeva, V.V. Dergunova, N.Yu. Ivannikov, O.Yu. Yushina, Moscow F.I. Inozemtsev City Clinical Hospital
Russian Journal of Woman and Child Health, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.32364/2618-8430-2022-5-2-153-156

Abstract:
Extragenital diseases currently hold one of the leading positions among the causes of maternal death. Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a congenital anomaly of the vascular system, which is a pathological direct connection between small arteries and small veins without an interim capillary network. This phenomenon is a prerequisite for vessel rupture and hemorrhage that is potentially lethal or results in severe disability. Brain AVMs cause intracranial hemorrhages in 23% of pregnant women and maternal death in 5–12%. The authors share their experience with brain AVM in a pregnant woman with favorable maternal and fetal outcomes. Management approaches are discussed. Timely diagnosis of AVM during pregnancy, multimodal management approach to pregnancy, delivery, and postnatal period, and the development of medical care algorithm reduce the rate of maternal death and morbidity and improve perinatal outcomes. KEYWORDS: pregnancy, delivery, postnatal period, arteriovenous malformation, hemorrhage, multimodal approach. FOR CITATION: Kerchelaeva S.B., Dergunova V.V., Ivannikov N.Yu., Yushina O.Yu. Multimodal approach to the management of pregnant women with brain arteriovenous malformation. Russian Journal of Woman and Child Health. 2022;5(2):153–156 (in Russ.). DOI: 10.32364/2618-8430-2022-5-2-153-156
New version
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.cd003436.pub3

Abstract:
Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the single most common cause of intracerebral haemorrhage in young adults. Brain AVMs also cause seizure(s) and focal neurological deficits (in the absence of haemorrhage, migraine or an epileptic seizure); approximately one fifth are incidental discoveries. Various interventions are used in an attempt to eradicate brain AVMs: neurosurgical excision, stereotactic radiotherapy/'radiosurgery' (using gamma knife, linear accelerator, proton beam, or 'Cyber Knife'), endovascular embolisation (using glues, particles, fibres, coils, or balloons), and staged combinations of these interventions. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2006. To assess the clinical effects of interventions to treat brain AVMs in adults (with the aim of either partial obliteration or total eradication), using data published in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched November 2009), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009), MEDLINE (1966 to November 2009) and EMBASE (1980 to November 2009). We searched international registers of clinical trials, the contents pages of relevant journals, and bibliographies of relevant articles (November 2009). We also contacted manufacturers of interventional treatments for brain AVMs (March 2005). We sought randomised trials of any or all of the interventions for brain AVMs, compared against each other or against usual medical therapy, with relevant clinical outcome measures. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and reviewed the relevant studies. One ongoing RCT fulfils the selection criteria for this review: A Randomized trial of Unruptured Brain Arteriovenous malformations (ARUBA, www.arubastudy.org), comparing interventional treatment versus medical management for brain AVMs that have never bled. We also found two RCTs which tested the equivalence of two embolic agents for the pre-operative embolisation of brain AVMs (one published, one unpublished), but none of the primary or secondary outcome measures in these trials met our desired criteria. We also excluded a third RCT which studied three different blood pressure lowering treatments to induce deliberate hypotension during surgical resection of brain AVMs because the intervention was not the focus of this review. There is no evidence from randomised trials with clear clinical outcomes comparing different interventional treatments for brain AVMs against each other or against usual medical therapy to guide the interventional treatment of brain AVMs in adults. One such trial (ARUBA) is ongoing.
, Charles P Warlow
Published: 25 January 2006
Abstract:
Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the single most common cause of intracerebral haemorrhage in young adults. Brain AVMs also cause seizure(s) and focal neurological deficits (in the absence of haemorrhage, migraine or an epileptic seizure); approximately one fifth are incidental discoveries. Various interventions are used in an attempt to eradicate brain AVMs: neurosurgical excision, stereotactic radiotherapy/'radiosurgery' (using gamma knife, linear accelerator or proton beam), endovascular embolisation (using glues, particles, fibres, coils, or balloons), and staged combinations of these interventions. To assess the clinical effects of interventions to treat brain AVMs in adults (with the aim of either partial obliteration or total eradication), using data published in randomised controlled trials. We searched: (1) the Cochrane Stroke Group Register (last searched December 2004); (2) medical literature databases (MEDLINE 1966 to 31 December 2004 and EMBASE 1980 to 31 December 2004); (3) on-line and paper journal surveillance; (4) the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2005); (5) international registers of clinical trials; (6) bibliographies of relevant articles identified by (1) to (5); and (7) we sought unpublished data from manufacturers of interventional treatments for brain AVMs. We sought randomised trials of any or all of the interventions for brain AVMs, compared against each other or against usual medical therapy, with relevant clinical outcome measures. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and reviewed the relevant studies. We did not find any randomised trials meeting our selection criteria. We found two randomised trials which tested the equivalence of two embolic agents for the pre-operative embolisation of brain AVMs (one published, one unpublished), but none of the primary or secondary outcome measures in these trials met our desired criteria; although important clinical outcomes were reported, meaningful comparison of the two treatment arms was impossible. We also excluded a third RCT which studied three different blood pressure lowering treatments to induce deliberate hypotension during surgical resection of brain AVMs, because the intervention was not the focus of this review. There is no evidence from randomised trials with clear clinical outcomes, comparing different interventional treatments for brain AVMs against each other or against usual medical therapy, to guide the interventional treatment of brain AVMs in adults. One such trial (ARUBA), comparing interventional versus conservative management for unruptured brain AVMs, is being planned.
Maksim Zagura, Heleri Konik, Helgi Padari, Tuuli Metsvaht, Toomas Hermlin, Liis Salumäe, Tiiu Tomberg
Published: 18 December 2015
by 10.15157
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Ahmed Attia Ahmed Hassan, Ali Hassan Elmokadem, Ahmed Bahaa Elden Elserwi, Mohamed Metwally Abo El Atta, Talal Ahmed Youssef Amer
Published: 1 February 2020
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 04; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1729057

Abstract:
Objectives: (1) To report our institutional initial technical experience in the endovascular management of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). (2) To detect the clinical outcome involving efficacy and complications of the endovascular management of cerebral AVMs. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study involving 14 cases diagnosed as having cerebral AVMs, who underwent diagnostic angiography and planned after written consent for a attempt of endovascular embolization. Our standard technique will be performed under a general anesthesia and get through transfemoral artery approach Microcatheter will be advanced through a guiding catheter to the arterial feeders supplying the cerebral AVMs. Onyx or Histoacryl was used as embolizing agent for successfully navigated cerebral AVMs by microcatheter Immediate follow-up conventional angiography was done to assess the size of residual AVM. Continuous clinical and radiological follow-up of our cases is still running every 6 months. Results: Technical results involved successful microcatheter navigation and embolization in 9 of 14 cases (64%) with failed microcatheter navigation in 2 of 4 cases (14%) and failed embolization in 3 cases (22%). Clinical results involved controlled recent intracranial hemorrhage on 2 of 3 cases (67%), controlled seizure on 2 of 5 cases (40%), and complicated hemorrhage on 2 of 9 cases (22.2%) with one reported death. Anatomical results more than 50% decreased size of 4 of 9 cases (44.4%) and less than 50% decreased size in 5 of 9 cases (55.5%). Conclusion: Endovascular embolization of cerebral AVMs by transfemoral artery approach using microcatheter navigation and embolization has some technical difficulties with success rate for navigation and embolization (64%). It is an effective treatment method to control hemorrhagic cerebral AVMs, to decrease associated seizures, and to decrease the size of cerebral AVMs. Publication Date: 26 April 2021 (online) © 2020. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
Sk Sader Hossain, Abdullah Alamgir, Ferdous Ara Islam, Misbahuddin Ahmed, Shafiul Alam, Amir Mohammad Khan
Journal of National Institute of Neurosciences Bangladesh, Volume 3, pp 62-66; https://doi.org/10.3329/jninb.v3i1.36275

Abstract:
Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a rare congenital condition of the brain. In majority of cases AVMs remain asymptomatic and silent till it ruptures. But it can be a cause of cerebral haemorrhage, stroke, seizures, moderate to severe headache, loss of vision, aphasia, numbness or weakness of limbs. In current study, revealed a 25 years age patient of AVM admitted in Department of Neurosurgery at National Institute of Neurosciences (NINS) on December, 2013 with the complaints of loss of consciousness two times before admission, history of generalized seizure started over left side, headache for 2 years and vertigo for 1 year. Following admission the patient was evaluated clinically including all neurological examinations. All routine investigations were done. The patient was further evaluated by MRI, CT scan, CTA. Arteriovenous malformation was found in left frontal region. Under G/A nidus was excised totally in a single mass. Post MRI had shown the total removal of the AVM. Histopathological findings also revealed arteriovenous malformations. The post-operative period was uneventful and patient improved satisfactorily. He was found neurologically stable in follow up after 3 months. These researchers reported this case for its rarity and effective diagnosis and treatment by surgery.Journal of National Institute of Neurosciences Bangladesh, 2017;3(1): 62-66
Jennifer H. Gill, Judith M. Redwin, Jan A. Van Wyk, Ernest Lacey
Published: 30 November 1991
International Journal for Parasitology, Volume 21, pp 771-776; https://doi.org/10.1016/0020-7519(91)90144-v

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
L Pan, W Xiang, Y Zhao
Published: 24 August 2021
by BMJ
ESMINT 2021 – Abstract book, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2021-esmint.29

Abstract:
Introduction Accurate diagnosis is essentially important for treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are limited due to the complex vessel overlapping. 4D DSA with both temporal and spatial resolution is able to reveal AVM angioarchitecture. Objective We compared the performance of 4D imaging with the conventional method for visualizing AVM. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic performance of 4D DSA and 4D prototype. Methods 37 patients were selected. The standard medical records were based on the conventional 2D and 3D DSA combination method. 2 independent experienced surgeons recorded assessments based only on 4D datasets. The evaluation results were then compared with the medical records using agreement analysis. Results Using either 4D DSA or 4D prototype, both reviewers reached a complete agreement with the medical records for Martin-Spetzler Scores and the presence of intracranial aneurysm. Assessing the number of feeding arteries, the agreement between 4D DSA and the medical records was 0.888 for both Reviewer A and B; the agreement between 4D prototype and the medical records was 0.917 for both reviewers. Determining the number of draining veins, the agreement between 4D DSA and the medical records was 0.97 for both reviewers; the agreement between 4D prototype and the medical records was 0.943 for Reviewer A and 0.941 for Reviewer B. Conclusion The diagnostic performance of both 4D DSA product and prototype software were largely equivalent to the combination method for cerebral AVM. 4D prototype further optimized the temporal resolution and image quality compared to 4D product. References Lang S, Gölitz P, Struffert T, Rösch J, Rössler K, Kowarschik M, Strother C, Doerfler A. 4D DSA for dynamic visualization of cerebral vasculature: a single-center experience in 26 cases. AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology 2017;38(6):1169–1176. Ognard J, Magro E, Caroff J, Ben Salem D, Andouard S, Nonent M, Gentric JC. A new time-resolved 3D angiographic technique (4D DSA): description, and assessment of its reliability in Spetzler-Martin grading of cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Journal of Neuroradiology = Journal de Neuroradiologie 2018;45(3):177–185. Disclosure Nothing to disclose
Hany Eldawoody, Mohamed Mostafa Aziz, Wasem Aziz
Published: 1 February 2019
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 03; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1730531

Abstract:
Background: Posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are complex neurovascular lesions, relatively infrequent and difficultly is encountered not uncommonly during their treatment. Although they represent less than 15% of all AVMs, studies showed that they have more aggressive natural history. The authors present their initial experience with multimodality management of 20 posterior fossa AVMs, with an emphasis on endovascular treatment in Egypt. Method(s): From January 2012 to august 2015; twenty patients with posterior fossa AVMs treated with endovascular techniques, radiosurgery and/or surgery were analyzed. Result(s): Out of the twenty cases; 15 cases were treated with onyx embolisation through 27 sessions, one case with glue NBCA. Out of these cases 3 were embolised over 90%, the rest of cases were partially embolised and referred for complementary treatment with surgery or gama knife. The most frequent difficulties encountered during endovascular treatment were catheter navigation in the tortuousity of SCA (2 territories), AICA (2 territories), PICA (1 territory). Identification of onyx flow to the vein in the working angle (3 cases), extravasation of onyx (2 cases). The average occlusion rate of the AVM embolised after an average 1.8 (range 1-7) procedure per case was 52.66%. The average size of AVM embolised was 2.6 cm in maximum diameter. 4 cases (20%) complicated by cerebellar tremors and ataxia 2 of them were transitory and 2 were permanent, one case died from pulmonary embolism. Pod2 and two cases with hemihypothesia, one was permanent. Conclusion(s): Considering our early experience, onyx embolisation to posterior fossa AVMs is feasible and can lead considerable obliteration rate when the AVM has single feeder, although the consideration of deep supply to the cerebellar nuclei and brain stem perforators is of utmost importance to diminish the possible untowarded consequences. Publication Date: 11 May 2021 (online) © 2019. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
, Muneyoshi Yasuda, Kentoaro Furusho, Hiroyuki Asakawa, Yuji Matsumaru, Masayuki Noguchi, Tadao Nose
Nepal Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 2, pp 81-84; https://doi.org/10.3126/njn.v2i1.20001

Abstract:
Spontaneous intracerebral hematomas usually produce the sudden onset of devastating neurological symptoms. We describe a case showing slowly progressive clinical symptoms followed by a sudden deterioration caused by two different types of intracerebral hematomas coexisting in the adjacent area. A 72-year-old female with a 2-year history of Alzheimer’s disease and a 3-month history of occasional headache and vomiting was admitted after she experienced the sudden onset of right hemiparesis and a speech disturbance. Neuroradiological examinations demonstrated two different types of intracerebral hematomas coexisting in the left temporal lobe. The patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy. A solid hematoma was found immediately below the cortex and a large hematoma cavity, which contained degraded bloody fluid, was found below the solid hematoma. Histological study demonstrated an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The AVM may have been responsible for the pathogenesis of these two different types of intracerebral hematomas. Initially, a silent intracerebral hemorrhage from the AVM and liquefaction of the hematoma probably formed the cavity and repeated small subclinical hemorrhages into the cavity during a prolonged period of time may have caused the growth of the inner hematoma. The sudden rupture of the AVM most likely caused the outer solid hematoma, resulting in the abrupt onset of hemiparesis and speech disturbance. This is the first case to demonstrate two different types of intracerebral hematomas coexisting in the adjacent area. A possible mechanism for this rare condition is discussed. Nepal Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 2, Number 1, 2005
Virendersingh Kapoorsingh Sheorain, Manju Bharath Nr
Published: 1 February 2019
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 03; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1730545

Abstract:
Background: Embolization of high flow pAVMs is a technical challenge. ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymer is a safe and effective liquid embolic agent routinely used in intracranial AVMs and its use is recently reported in peripheral AVMs as well. Most important technical challenge during ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymer injection is control of reflux. Modified Pressure Cooker Technique (mPCT) is a medthod to prevent reflux of EVOH which is well described in intracranial AVMs, however not reported in peripheral AVms. In Modified Pressure Cooker Technique a glus plug is created proximal to the devilary tip of detachable microcatheter in a unique way. We describe successful use of modified Pressure Cooker Technique (mPCT) in peripheral AVMs to control reflux and achieve adequate embolization. Method(s): Three patients with high flow peripheral AVMs were treated with ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymer (MENOX 18) embolization using modified Pressure Cooker Technique. We used Ultrasound guided Femoral access in all 3 cases. We used coaxial sytem using 7F 70 cm long Guiding sheath and intermediate catheter DAC 070. We used Combination of EVOH compatible detachable microcatheter (APOLLO 3 cm tip) and a non detachable microcatheter (Echelon 10) for nBCA glue plug creation needed for mPCT. We injected EVOH copolymer (Menox 18) via detachable APOLLO micro catheter and NBCA injection via the proximal catheter to create a glue plug to prevent EVOH copolymer reflux during injection of EVOH copolymer. Result(s): We achieved 100% Technical success: ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymer did not refluxed proximal to the glued segment of the detachable microcatheter and we had safe removal of detachable microcatheter post embolisation. Satisfactory embolization of the target nidus in all. No intra-operative complications. Conclusion(s): Use of modified Pressure Cooker Technique (mPCT)in peripheral AVMs is: (1) Safe and effective for ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymer injection. (2)Prevents reflux and allows forward progression of ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymer into nidus. (3) Can be applied in peripheral AVMs whenever ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymer is used as the embolic agent. Publication Date: 11 May 2021 (online) © 2019. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
Maria Benoy, Karthik Vadamalai, , Todd Sheppard
Published: 1 October 2015
Chest, Volume 148, pp 885A-885A; https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.2230349

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Theresa Deisher, Peter Jarzyna, Kendra Poulin, Yumna Zahid, Arya Ashok, Spencer Sawas, Manisha Pathak, Colleen Rylatt, Vaishnavi Parthasarathy
Journal of Clinical Oncology, Volume 40; https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2022.40.16_suppl.e14545

Abstract:
E14545 Background: Glucocorticoids (GC) are a common component of blood cancer regimens, at doses 40 mg or lower due to concerns of pancreatitis and hepatotoxicity (Walasik-Szemplińska et al. Thyroid Research (2019) 12:13; Ataallah et al. Cureus. 2020 Jul; 12(7)) and neuropsychiatric effects. AVM Biotechnology has developed a high concentration, high volume, preservative-free, patent pending formulation of dexamethasone (Dex) (AVM0703), allowing administration up to 21 mg/kg (1470 mg for 70 kg) in one-hour IV infusion. Prophylactic use of physiologic hydrocortisone reduces the risk of GC neuropsychiatric side-effects (Warris, L. T. et al. J. Clin. Oncol. (2016) 34:2287; Meijer & de Kloet Endocrinology (2017) 158:448). At supra-pharmacologic doses (>6 mg/kg) AVM0703 mobilizes endogenous bispecific gamma delta invariant TCR+ Natural Killer T-like cells (AVM-NKT) (PCT/US21/19773), via a non-GC receptor, that rapidly home to cancer in tumor models and are directly related to tumor killing. GCs have been reported to induce biological responses independent of GCRs: corticosterone has been shown to bind a G-protein coupled receptor that does not bind either Dex or aldosterone (Mitre-Aguilar, et. Al International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology (2015) 8:1; Powell, C. E., et. Al. Endocrine (1999) 10: 271) and the non-GCR mineralocorticoid receptor has high affinity for prednisone but not Dex. Methods: a) Mouse splenocytes or human whole blood were incubated with Dex from 1nM to 1mM. Apoptosis was measured for human whole blood by CBCs and for mouse splenocytes by flow cytometry 4 to 6 hours later. RU486 was used to block expected transmembrane (tm)GCR activity. b) Naïve, tumor bearing and humanized mice were dosed with AVM0703 at human equivalent doses (HED) >18 mg/kg. Depending on the disease state of the mice, novel AVM-NKT were observed in the blood between 3 and 96 hours later, determined by flow cytometry. Results: a) Apoptosis via the tmGCR was observed at expected concentrations between 10nM and 100uM and was blocked by the GCR antagonist RU486. At concentrations above 250uM, which correspond to in vivo peak blood levels from acute 7mg/kg and greater, no Dex-induced apoptosis was observed. b) Acute supra-pharmacologic AVM0703 induced the appearance of CD3+, CD56+, gdTCR+, invariant TCR+ bi-specific Natural Killer T-like cells, that in a cancer setting also expressed activation markers like CD16 and NKp44. Intriguingly, the AVM-NKT also express B220 in certain settings, and CD3+ B220+ DP has been indicative of IL-2 or IL-12 lymphoma killing (Masztalerz, A, et. Al. Anticancer Res (2004) 24(5A):2633). Conclusions: CBC’s and clinical chemistries from enrolling clinical trial confirmed the in vitro non-GCR findings.
New version
Susanna M Zuurbier,
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Volume 9; https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.cd003436.pub4

Abstract:
Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the single most common cause of intracerebral haemorrhage in young adults. Brain AVMs also cause seizure(s) and focal neurological deficits (in the absence of haemorrhage, migraine or an epileptic seizure); approximately one-fifth are incidental discoveries. Various interventions are used in an attempt to eradicate brain AVMs: neurosurgical excision, stereotactic radiosurgery, endovascular embolization, and staged combinations of these interventions. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2006, and last updated in 2009. To determine the effectiveness and safety of the different interventions, alone or in combination, for treating brain AVMs in adults compared against either each other, or conservative management, in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The Cochrane Stroke Group Information Specialist searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 7 January 2019), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2019, Issue 1) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid (1980 to 14 January 2019), and Embase OVID (1980 to 14 January 2019). We searched international registers of clinical trials, the contents pages of relevant journals, and bibliographies of relevant articles (November 2009). We also contacted manufacturers of interventional treatments for brain AVMs (March 2005). We sought RCTs of any intervention for brain AVMs (used alone or in combination), compared against each other or against conservative management, with relevant clinical outcome measures. One author screened the results of the updated searches for potentially eligible RCTs for this updated review. Both authors independently read the potentially eligible RCTs in full and confirmed their inclusion according to the inclusion criteria. We resolved disagreement by discussion. We assessed the risk of bias in included studies and applied GRADE. We included one trial with 226 participants: A Randomized trial of Unruptured Brain Arteriovenous Malformations (ARUBA), comparing intervention versus conservative management for unruptured brain AVMs (that had never bled). The quality of evidence was moderate because we found just one trial that was at low risk of bias other than a high risk of performance bias due to participants and treating physicians not being blinded to allocated treatment. Data on functional outcome and death at a follow-up of 12 months were provided for 218 (96%) of the participants in ARUBA. In this randomized controlled trial (RCT), intervention compared to conservative management increased death or dependency (modified Rankin Scale score ≥ 2, risk ratio (RR) 2.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28 to 4.98; 1 trial, 226 participants; moderate-quality evidence) and the proportion of participants with symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (RR 6.75, 95% CI 2.07 to 21.96; 1 trial, 226 participants; moderate-quality evidence), but there was no difference in the frequency of epileptic seizures (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.06; 1 trial, 226 participants; moderate-quality evidence). Three RCTs are ongoing. We found moderate-quality evidence from one RCT including adults with unruptured brain AVMs that conservative management was superior to intervention with respect to functional outcome and symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage over one year after randomization. More RCTs will help to confirm or refute these findings.
V Rahimi-Movaghar,
East African Medical Journal, Volume 83, pp 393-400; https://doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v83i7.9452

Abstract:
Objectives: To determine the physics, biology, outcomes and risks of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in treating brain tumours, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), pain and movement disorders. Data sources: A retrospective MEDLINE search was used to find all gamma knife radiosurgery studies published from 1967 to 12th March 2005 and strict inclusion criteria were applied. Study selection: Limited to the review articles in the human study with the key word of gamma knife radiosurgery. Data extraction: In each subject, both authors reviewed related articles separately. Data synthesis: Adding up data and compare the results. Conclusions: The GKRS represents one of the most advanced means available to treat brain tumours, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), pain and movement disorders safely and effectively. At present, the long-term results after GKRS procedures remain to be documented. The physics, biology, current indications and expected outcomes after GKRS are discussed. East African Medical Journal Vol. 83(7) 2006: 393-400
Yam Bahadur Roka, Mohan Karki
Nepal Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 14, pp 46-48; https://doi.org/10.3126/njn.v14i3.20527

Abstract:
Chronic encapsulated intracerebral hematoma (CE-ICH) is an uncommon pathology that presents with headache, seizure, focal neurological deficits, or as a tumor. Trauma as a cause for CE-ICH is even rare and we believe this is the first case report as “trauma causing chronic encapsulated intracerebral hematoma “search in PubMed did not reveal any results. Repeated micro-hemorrhages in the CM or AVM are supposed to cause this lesion which progress from an earlier encapsulated phase to a thick capsulated stage with edema and clinical symptoms. CT or MRI is the diagnostic modality and it mimics, tumor, AVM, CM, angiomableed, cerebral abscess, metastatic mass or neurocysticercosis. Burr hole, mini-craniotomy, craniotomy, CT guided stereotactic aspiration or endoscopic excision are some options with equally good results. The present case with history of trauma was managed successfully with craniotomy with no recurrence for past one year. Nepal Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 14, Number 3, 2017, page: 46-48
G W Kitonyi, P M Wambugu, H O Oburra, J M Ireri
East African Medical Journal, Volume 85; https://doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v85i8.9659

Abstract:
Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia, (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder that is characterised by telangiectasias, (small vascular malformations), in mucocutaneous tissues and arterial venous malformations, (AVMs), in various internal organs. Although HHT is relatively common in whites, the disorder has been reported to be rare in people of black African descent. Majority of HHT patients present with recurrent epistaxis, which in a significant proportion of patients is severe, warranting repeated blood transfusions and iron supplementation. Telangiectasias are most frequent on the tongue, hands, nose, lips and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). AVMs occur in internal organs, particularly the lungs, brain, and the liver. Early and correct diagnosis of HHT is crucial as patients derive benefit from certain specific treatment modalities. Besides, AVMs which occur in various organs pose serious complications that may lead to death and therefore require early detection. We report a 55 year old black African male with HHT who presented with severe recurrent epistaxis and haematochezia leading to severe anaemia requiring repeated blood transfusions. His son, daughter and a maternal uncle experience milder recurrent epistaxis. The management of this patient and a brief review of the clinical features and management of HHT is presented. Our aim is to raise awareness of the occurrence of HHT in Kenya, in order to enhance early diagnosis and appropriate management. East African Medical Journal Vol. 85 (8) 2008: pp. 412-416
, Abdelmadjid Habba, Mounir Tabouche, Chafa Aimeur, Sidahmed Faraoun, Boudjema Mansouri
Published: 1 February 2019
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 03; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1730549

Abstract:
Background: Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and fistulas (AVFs) are rare vascular disorders, in which embolization is the first line treatment frequently associated to an adjunctive surgery for superficial and facial localizations. The aim of this study was to report our experience in embolization of high flow peripheral AVMs with onyx. Method(s): 5 women and 4 men were treated by percutaneous embolization with onyx, in our institute from January 2016 to June 2017 for superficial facial high flow vascular malformation. 3 patients were treated for acute bleeding and 6 patients for esthetic purpose. Patients were followed at 1, 3 and 12 months. Clinically symptoms, bleeding and esthetic improvement were assessed. Result(s): During this period we have embolized in our department 1 AVFs (Houdart type I) and 8 AVMs: 6 type ii and 2 type III (Houdart classification). Complete occlusion of the malformation in one session was achieved in 5 patients, and 1 patient needed a second session. 2 patients suffered from bruits which had totally disappeared immediately after embolization. Bleeding was controlled in all patients, and esthetic improvement was achieved at one month in 3 patients (labial AVM), and the 3 other at 3 months. None of our patients underwent surgery after embolization. No major complications were recorded. Conclusion(s): Onyx embolization for superficial facial high flow malformation is an effective and safe therapy, could be an option for first and only line treatment in non-complex lesions. Publication Date: 11 May 2021 (online) © 2019. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
S Patwari, A K Verma, Alok K Srivastava, Rc Shukla
Nepalese Journal of Radiology, Volume 1, pp 27-29; https://doi.org/10.3126/njr.v1i1.6319

Abstract:
Acute or subacute myelopathy with spontaneous thrombosis of the veins in a patient with a spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) has been referred to as "Foix-Alajouanine syndrome (FAS)". A previously healthy 35-year-old man developed neurological illness with progressive lower extremity weakness and low back pain. MRI demonstrated diffuse swelling of the thoracic spinal cord, suggesting myelopathy with few intradural extramedullary serpeginous flow voids. We report a case of Foix-Alajouanine syndrome with a review of the literature. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/njr.v1i1.6319 Nepalese Journal of Radiology Vol.1(1): 27-29
D. Nath, M. Kumath
Published: 26 June 2010
British Dental Journal, Volume 208, pp 549-549; https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2010.544

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Asim Shah
Published: 1 February 2020
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 04; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1729099

Abstract:
Objectives: Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) are structurally abnormal vessels that provide direct capillary-free communication between the pulmonary and the systemic circulations and hence an anatomic right to left shunt. They are commonly caused by hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Treating these lesions is of high clinical priority as they can increase the incidence of developing stroke and cerebral abscesses. The main indication to treat these lesions is when the feeding artery measures more than 4 cm. Here, we present our experience in treating 18 patients with endovascular embolization in Nottingham University Hospitals. Methods: A retrospective review of all the PAVMs underwent endovascular embolization between October 2014 and November 2019 (5 years) was conducted. We reviewed the number of treatments, clinical success, complications, and the recanalization rates. Results: A total of 18 patients with PAVMs treated with endovascular embolization over 5 years. There were 12 males and 6 females with mean age of 56 years. The documented and genetically proven underlying cause was found to be HHT in most cases (15 patients). A total of 25 treatments were performed (4 patients had multiple AVMs treated in separate occasions and two patients had recanalization of previously treated AVMs which were then re-treated). One patient with AVM underwent angiogram which showed multiple small AVMs which were not treated. One patient had difficult embolization with migration of coil into the pulmonary vein and the right ventricle which was then retrieved using a vascular snare with resolution of ectopics and no late complications developed. No major or minor postembolization complications developed; one patient was admitted postembolization with pleuritic pain which was treated conservatively. No patients suffered a stroke or cerebral abscess since treatment. Sixteen treatments had documented successful improvement in their oxygen saturations on respiratory review. Three patients developed recanalization (defined as persistent perfusion through a previously placed coil). Two patients had further treatments and one patient did not have further treatment. Conclusion: Endovascular embolization is a minimally invasive treatment for PAVMs with high technical and clinical success and low complication rate. The most common persistent pattern in our series was found to be recanalization. Publication Date: 26 April 2021 (online) © 2020. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
Published: 26 February 2017
Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Volume 39, pp 45-48; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2017.02.016

Abstract:
The knowledge of reporting compliance of systematic reviews with PRISMA guidelines may assist in improving the quality of secondary research in brain AVM management and subsequently application to patient population and clinical practice. This may allow researchers and clinicians to be equipped to appraise existing literatures based on known deficit to look for or expect. The objective of this study was to assess the compliance of systematic reviews and meta-analysis in the management of brain AVM. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses articles published in medical journals between 1st of May 2011 and 30th April 2016 (five-year period) were examined. Exclusion criteria were articles that were not systematic reviews and not meta-analyses, narrative literature reviews, historical literature reviews, animal studies, unpublished articles, commentaries and letter to the editor. Electronic database search performed through Medline PubMed on 20th September 2016. This systematic review examined seven systematic review articles on intracranial arteriovenous malformation compliance with PRISMA statement guidelines. The mean percentage of applicable PRISMA items across all studies was 74% (range 67-93%). Protocol registration and declaration, risk of bias and funding sources were the most poorly reported of the PRISMA items (14% each). A significant variance in the total percentages was evident between studies (67-93%). Systematic review reporting in medical literature is excessively variable and overall poor. As these papers are being published with increasing frequency, need to fully adhere to PRISMA statement guide for systematic review to ensure high-quality publications. Complete reporting of PRISMA items within systematic reviews in cerebral arteriovenous malformation enhance quality assessment, robust critical appraisal, better judgement and ultimately sound application to practice thereby improving research standards and patients care.
- Md Shahidullah, Suvash Kanti Dey, Anis Ahmed, Nahid Sultana
Bangladesh Journal of Neuroscience, Volume 30, pp 62-68; https://doi.org/10.3329/bjn.v30i2.57388

Abstract:
Background: Spinal Arterio-Venous Shunts are rare but treatable diseases. AVF has a direct shunt between artery and vein. AVM has a nidus between artery and vein. Differentiation is necessary because, the clinical presentation, angiographic architecture, and treatment options are different. Rationale: Presenting clinical features are nonspecific and vary in age and sex. MR images raise the suspicion of diagnosis. For proper understanding of disease and planning of treatment DSA is necessary. Objectives: To evaluate the nature of clinical feature, angiographic findings, and initial outcome after embolization in patients of spinal arterio-venous shunt. Materials & Methods: It was prospective study. Patients were referred for spinal DSA. Risk of complication was properly discussed with the patient and attendant and informed written consent was taken. Results: Among 9 patients, 5 were female and 4 were male. Male female ratio was 1: 1.25. Three patients were diagnosed as type I, three as type II, and three as type IV. All 3 patients (100%) of dural fistula were male, all 3 patients (100%) of pial fistula were female. Average age at presentation was 36 yrs. And mean age of dural AVF was 60.33 yrs, pial AVF was 18.33 yrs and spinal AVM was 29.33 yrs. Spinal DAVF occurred in patients ranging from 57 to 64 years of age, with an average age of 60.33 years. The average length of time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis was 16.44 months (ranging from 3 to 36 month). All 9 patients (100%) of patients had motor weakness, sensory disturbance was found in 66.66% (six of nine patients) and urinary disturbance was found in 77.77% (seven of nine patients). Progressive clinical course was followed in 100% of patients (all of nine patients). MRI findings revealed flow void in 77.77% of patients (seven of nine patients). Increased T2 signal in the spinal cord was present in 88.88% of patients (eight of nine patients). After DSA total 77.7% (seven of nine patients) feeder was located in low thoracic and lumbar region. Conclusion: Spinal AVM & AVF remain undiagnosed for a long period. They should be treated early for prevention of progressive morbidity and disability. MRI features of cord edema, contrast enhancement, and peri-medullary vessels may lead to the diagnosis of these vascular lesions. Bangladesh Journal of Neuroscience 2014; Vol. 30 (2): 62-68
, Awais Ashfaq
Published: 20 July 2021
Pediatric Cardiology, Volume 42, pp 1483-1487; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00246-021-02682-2

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Forhad Hossain Chowdhury, Mohammod Raziul Haque, Afm Momtazul Haque
Journal of Surgical Sciences, Volume 16, pp 106-109; https://doi.org/10.3329/jss.v16i2.43658

Abstract:
Patient presenting as a case of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) are usually resistant to antiepileptic drugs and surgery is the treatment of choice. This type of epilepsy may be due to Mesial Temporal Sclerosis (MTS), tumors [i.e. low grade glioma, Arterio-venous Malformation (AVM) etc], trauma, infection (Tuberculosis) etc. Here we report a case of surgically treated TLE that was due to a large tuberculoma in medial temporal lobe. Intractable epilepsy caused by tuberculoma is rare. The only presenting symptoms was Complex partial seizure (Psychomotor epilepsy) for which the patient underwent scalp EEG (Electro Encephalography) and MRI (Magnetic resonance imaging) of brain. The patient was managed by amygdalohippocampectomy with lesionectomy plus standard anterior lobectomy. Postoperatively she was on anti-tubercular therapy and on carbamazepine. The case was seizure and disease free till last follow up. Journal of Surgical Sciences (2012) Vol. 16 (2) : 106-109
Comment
B. H. Gerald Rogers
Archives of Internal Medicine, Volume 164, pp 678-679; https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.164.6.678-b

Abstract:
This letter is in response to the article by Batur et al, "Increased Prevalence of Aortic Stenosis in Patients With Arteriovenous Malformations of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Heyde Syndrome," that appeared in the August 11/25, 2003, issue.1 I would like to congratulate Drs Batur, Stewart, and Isaacson for showing a relationship between aortic stenosis and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the gastrointestinal tract. The large number of patients in their retrospective review and their use of objective data from endoscopy, angiography, and echocardiography should make their conclusion convincing. However, I strongly object to describing it as the "Heyde syndrome." In a 1-paragraph Letter to the Editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1958, Heyde2 noted that he had seen 10 patients in the previous 10 years with calcific aortic stenosis who had gastrointestinal bleeding for which he could discover no cause. Nowhere did he describe the bleeding to be coming from an AVM. Galloway and associates3 were among the first to angiographically demonstrate vascular malformations in the right large bowel in patients who had aortic stenosis and lower intestinal bleeding of obscure cause. I was the first to perform colonoscopy in the Chicago area, so early in my career many patients were referred to me with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. In a short time I had seen 5 patients who had an acquired vascular abnormality of the cecal area. I was able to control the bleeding by electrocoagulation in all 5 patients. None had "pure" aortic stenosis but all had cardiovascular disease.4 Baum and associates5 were instrumental in bringing this lesion to the attention of angiographers. Boley and associates6 did an injection study of resected colon specimens and found the vascular abnormalities quite frequent, even in apparently healthy patients. In my practice I accumulated more patients with bleeding vascular abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract and published 27 of the cases in 1980.7 Twenty-four patients had the lesions in the colon and 3 in the stomach. Only 4 had aortic stenosis. Shortly after publishing this article I found typical bleeding vascular abnormalities in the jejunum at peroral enteroscopy in an elderly patient with advanced coronary artery disease. The problem with this syndrome is that it is not clear-cut. Not all patients with aortic stenosis develop an AVM lesion. Many incidental vascular abnormalities are found in the gastrointestinal tract not related to any other obvious diagnosis. My own theory is that acquired vascular abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract are related to localized ischemia. It is generally accepted that ischemia induces the formation of angiogenesis factors. The lesions would have a predilection for the cecal area because that part of the anatomy is supplied by end arteries from the long superior mesenteric. In addition, the mucosa is exposed to the large volume of anaerobic content in the cecum, which acts as an oxygen sink. Localized ischemia can be caused by many factors, both local and ischemic. Thus, we have inconsistencies in the relationship between aortic stenosis and other conditions associated with acquired vascular abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract.
Troels Hvelplund, Bibi Lange, Susanne Djernes Bird, Malene Korsholm,
Published: 11 October 2021
Abstract:
Background Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by several clinical symptoms including epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations (AVM), and telangiectasia. In 2018, European Reference Network for Rare Vascular Diseases (VASCERN) recommended five outcome measures for HHT-patients to guide health care providers, some with limited experience in treating HHT, and thereby maximizing the number of HHT-patients receiving good care. The outcome measures cover the following aspects: 1) 90% of the patients should receive a pulmonary AVM (PAVM) screening; 2) 90% of the patients should receive written advice on nosebleed; 3) 70% should be assessed for iron deficiency; 4) 100% of the patients should receive written advice on antibiotic (AB) prophylaxis prior to dental and surgical procedures, and; 5) 100% of relevant patients should receive written advice on pregnancy. We have introduced the outcome measures as Benchmarks in our HHT-centre and wanted to evaluate the extend of implementation we have achieved. We constantly struggle to secure the best possible treatment of our HHT-patients.Methods The study was a non-interventional retrospective study. All data was collected from medical journals and from the Danish HHT-database. Results A total of 180 HHT-patients were included, all diagnosed in the period from January 1st 2016 to December 31st 2020. All patients were screened for PAVM. We could confirm that 66% of patients who had epistaxis received thoroughly advice. Assessment for iron deficiency was performed in 80 % of the adult patients. Thoroughly advice on antibiotic prophylaxis was documented in 75%. Thoroughly advice on pregnancy was documented in 80% of female patients 15-45 years of age. There were no significant differences over time for any of the outcome measures. Conclusions The Danish HHT-centre reached the target threshold for outcome measures 1 and 3. We could not document reaching the target thresholds for outcome measures 2, 4, and 5. As information and education is a very important part of HHT care, we will focus on and document that all patients receive the relevant advice and as part of our care, we will in the near future implement an electronic solution with advice for HHT patients.
, Yutaka Kai, Motohiro Morioka, Kiyoshi Kazekawa, Yasuji Ishimaru, Hiroo Iwata, Yukitaka Ushio
Journal of Neurosurgery, Volume 97, pp 889-895; https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.2002.97.4.0889

Abstract:
Object. The authors have developed a mixture of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVAL) and iopamidol, which is dissolved in ethanol, as an alternative solvent to provide a safe means of embolizing arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods. A two-stage delivery technique is required to prevent premature precipitation in the catheter when using this material: the catheter is first infused with 30% ethanol and this is followed by the delivery of the EVAL—ethanol mixture. Acute angiographic changes were analyzed after superselective delivery of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 30% ethanol into the renal artery of rabbits. Histological changes following the embolization of the renal artery achieved using the EVAL—ethanol mixture were recorded at 1 hour and at 2 and 16 weeks after the procedure. Although DMSO always produced severe, rapidly progressive vasospasm in the renal artery during a 1- to 60-minute postinfusion, 30% ethanol did not. Microscopically, the lumens of embolized vessels examined 1 hour after embolization with EVAL—ethanol appeared to be filled with EVAL sponges, leaving almost no open spaces. The space between the EVAL sponges and the inner surface of the vessels was filled with fresh thrombus. In the vessel walls of specimens examined 2 weeks after embolization there was no or a slight inflammatory reaction. Scattered in the EVAL sponges were almost equal numbers of neutrophilic granulocytes and mononuclear cells, indicative of a mild inflammatory response. In specimens examined 16 weeks postembolization, the changes noted at 2 weeks were intensified. There was no definite histopathological evidence of mural hemorrhage, perivascular extravasation of the mixture, or perivascular hemorrhage in any specimen that was examined. Conclusions. Although the degree of permanence of this embolization material is yet unknown, the mixture was easy to handle, and appeared safe and effective for AVM embolization. Its nonadhesive characteristic and its ability to be infused by repeated injections make it an attractive alternative to currently available materials. The good results obtained in this study led us to undertake a clinical trial, the results of which are contained in a companion article in this issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery.
Published: 26 April 2017
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 01; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1729831

Abstract:
Background: Post partum haemorrhage secondary to placenta accrete is a serious complication of childbirth. The current available treatment ranges from emergency hysterectomy to uterine artery embolisation. We describe a patient who presented with PPH in whom retained placenta accreta associated with vascular malformation was successfully treated with uterine artery embolisation together with review of literatures. Case Report: A 38-year old nulliparus presented with significant post partum haemorrhage of 3.6 Liters, intially controlled by packing. Five weeks post partum, the patient presented with recurrent unprovoked bleed. Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) were demonstrated retained placental tissue with dilated vessels and increased vascular flowconsistent with retained placenta accreta and vascular malformation. First session embolisation was performed using Embospheres particles 700-900 microns (Merit Medical Inc., USA). A second embolisation procedure was carried out via the left CFA using micro coils (Boston Scientific, Watertown, MA, USA) and gelfoam pledges until complete occlusion was achieved. Two months post-partum, the patient presented complaining of foul smelling vaginal discharge, due to necrotic placenta and received full course of antibiotics with dilatation and curettage. Follow-up US demonstrated no residual vascular malformation. Conclusions: Placenta accreta and uterine AVMs are recognised causes of uterine bleeding. Uterine artery embolization is an alternative treatment for uncontrolled postpartum haemorrhage and an effective treatment for acquired AVM's outside of pregnancy. Publication Date: 26 April 2021 (online) © 2017. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
, , Dimitrios Nikolaou, Julian Norman-Taylor, Mark Johnson, Meen-Yau Thum
American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, Volume 80; https://doi.org/10.1111/aji.13037

Abstract:
The female reproductive tract has an active microbiome, and it is suggested that these microbes could influence the outcome of assisted reproductive technologies (ART). This systematic review aimed to assess the vaginal/uterine microbiome, specifically with regard to improving the outcome of ART. English peer‐reviewed journals were searched for studies investigating the vaginal/uterine micriobiome and female reproductive tract, using PRISMA guidelines. Twenty‐six studies were included, 19 studying the vaginal and seven investigating the uterine microbiome. Studies using culture‐based technologies found an abnormal vaginal microbiome AVM was not associated with ART outcome. However, studies using sequence‐based technologies found an abnormal vaginal microbiome had a negative effect on ART. An abnormal uterine microbiome impacted ART outcome in all of the studies which used culture‐based methods and the most extensive of the two studies using metagenomic sequencing. This review has revealed a lack of translational data relating an abnormal vaginal/uterine microbiome to ART outcomes, with inconsistencies between the results of the different studies. Therefore the nature of the relationship between the vaginal/uterine microbiome and fertility remains unknown. As we better characterize this relationship using modern metagenomic techniques, the potential to manipulate the female reproductive tract microbiome to improve ART could be a reality.
Journal of Clinical Interventional Radiology ISVIR, Volume 5, pp 131-132; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1730759

Abstract:
Prof. Luc Picard, the pioneer French interventional neuroradiologist passed away in April 2021. Absence of his towering figure is a profound loss to neuroradiology, in particular, to the discipline of interventional neuroradiology. Luc Picard was born in Metz, Germany, on November 29, 1937. His father was a family doctor. He was the last of the four children (one brother and two sisters). He was educated in Nancy in Saint Sigisbert College (Catholic college) and then in the Faculty of medicine in Nancy. He is survived by his wife Françoise, a neuropsychiatrist and a brilliant analyst, three children (two daughters and a son who is a family physician near Nancy), nine grandchildren and a great grandchild. He started his training as a clinical neurologist in the early 1960s. Realizing the importance of radiology in neurological diagnosis, he completed additional specialization with a diploma in neuroradiology. He was closely associated with Dr. Rene Djindjan, a pioneer and authority on spinal vasculature and angiography before joining the Department of Radiology in Nancy, France, in 1970. Soon after, he set up an independent division of neuroradiology, thereafter upgraded it to a full-fledged department in 1977, and served as its Director (1977–1980), Professor (1980–1984), and Chairman (1984–2004). He spent his entire career working at this institution until his retirement. In his long career spanning five decades, Prof. Picard held many notable positions—the Professor of Neuroradiology, President of the World Federation of Neuroradiological Societies, and Honorary President of the World Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology. He was also a founder member of the French Society of Neuroradiology in 1970 and became its President in 1989. He was the Editor of the Journal of Neuroradiology from 1978 to 2002. A detailed biographical sketch of this pioneer is available in the following links (htpp://www. sfrnet.org).[1] [2] My first interaction with Prof. Picard was in 1986when he visited Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (SCTIMST), Thiruvananthapuram ([Fig. 1]). Dr. Picard delivered guest lectures and demonstrated the techniques of superselective embolization, balloon occlusion, and other techniques that had just become current in the practice of neurointervention in the 1980s. His visit was the impetus and catalyst for transforming our fledgling Interventional Neuroradiology program at SCTIMST into a full-fledged state-of–the-art clinical service. Prof. Picard taught me and my colleagues the use of Ingenor microcatheters, the injection chamber for propelling the catheters under hydrostastic pressure into the cerebral circulation, creating a calibrated leak in the microballoons and mounting them in the microcatheters using latex ligatures. He also demonstrated the correct technique of preparing isobutyl cyanoacrylate (2-IBCA), the then available liquid polymerizing embolic agent, with Myodil and tantalum powder. He performed superselective angiography in a patient with cerebral arterovenous malformation (AVM), deftly navigating the microcatheter into the feeding branch of the middle cerebral artery. Having almost approached the nidus using the Balt Pursil microcatheter in another AVM, he abandoned the procedure, a great lesson to us when and why not to deliver 2-IBCA in the given circumstance. He treated two other patients, one with a peripheral vascular malformation in the leg and the other with an aneurysm of the internal carotid artery near the skull base. He would often quote his first-time experience of witnessing seizures following intra-arterial injection of papaverine in a young female patient for the relief of vasospasm, while demonstrating the procedure at our Institute. His lectures illustrated with excellent, glass-mounted 35-mm slides on a range of topics from treatment of cerebral AVMs, aneurysms, carotid-cavernous fistulae, and spinal AVMs revealed the phenomenal amount of work that this pioneer had undertaken to advance the field of neurointerventional radiology. Current concept of transvenous approach to cerebral AVMs may be based on his simple anatomical drawings of flow dynamics. With profound gratitude, I presented him with ready to use sterilized packets of hydrogel microspheres synthesized at our Research and Development Wing, an embolic material he was unfamiliar with. It was indeed our great fortune to have been guided and tutored by Prof. Picard. Despite restrictions on short-term visits he took personal interest and facilitated my trip to his center at Nancy, France, in the late 1990s. I saw him meticulously noting down relevant and critical points before the procedure in every case file. Organization of his workflow, follow-up, and documentation were extraordinary to emulate. Off working hours Dr. Picard was a very friendly person with a subtle and wry sense of humor ([Fig. 2]). He spoke English with a charming continental accent that was special and amusing. He enjoyed Indian food and regaled us with stories of his visits to other parts of the world, including Shanghai (China had not yet opened up then). He was a fan of modern theatre and art with interest in geopolitics. The demise of Prof. Luc Picard is a great loss to the fraternity of radiologists, particularly the neuroradiologists. He will be missed and will never be forgotten by the interventional community of India. May his soul rest in peace. Publication Date: 14 June 2021 (online) © 2021. Indian Society of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon....
Saima Ahmad, Umair Rashid Chaudhry
Published: 1 February 2019
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 03; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1730530

Abstract:
Background: Direct puncture embolization with glue is an effective technique for pre-operative devascularisation of craniofacial arteriovenous malformations. Venous outflow and arterial inflow of the lesion need to be limited during injection of embolic material. Manual compression is the standard procedure for flow reduction, but when an AVM has multiple channels of venous drainage, achieving successful blockage of blood is technically difficult. This study demonstrates the use of a circumferential cookie cutter ring to reduce flow, with better results compared to manual compression. Method(s): This is a retrospective study of ten patients, over a period of two years, with craniofacial arteriovenous malformations who were treated with direct percutaneous injection of glue. Pre-embolization angiography was performed to see arterial feeders and venous draining veins. Adjunctive manoeuvres were used during embolization, including external compression of venous pouch with circular cookie cutter rings of different sizes varying based on lesion size. Glue cast was localized within and around the margins of circular cookie cutter ring without any distal migration. Result(s): No neurological complications secondary to the embolization procedure were observed. The arteriovenous shunts were successfully occluded in all cases. There was partial occlusion in two cases. Total occlusion achieved in five cases when embolization was followed by surgery. Only one case required a second session to achieve total occlusion. Post embolization, there was minimal residual flow in one patient, who declined further treatment due to mitigation of symptoms. The shape of glue cast was changed in two cases after removal of cookie cutter when low concentrated glue was used. No skin necrosis was seen post embolization. Conclusion(s): Percutaneous direct puncture embolization with glue saves time and is a safer method for superficial craniofacial AVMs with prominent venous pouch when external compression was applied with circumferential cookie cutters to reduce venous outflow. Publication Date: 11 May 2021 (online) © 2019. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
L Chilton, , I Ashworth, D Murdy, A K Burnett, D Grimwade, A V Moorman,
Published: 23 January 2017
Leukemia, Volume 31, pp 1234-1237; https://doi.org/10.1038/leu.2017.37

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 26 April 2017
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 01; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1729830

Abstract:
Background: Uterine arteriovenous malformations are rare. However, they may present with life threatening bleeding. Traditionally hysterectomy is the mainstay therapy for these patients, however, increasing reports of successful control using endovascular techniques have recently surfaced using various embolic agents and techniques. Here we report two cases of acquired uterine arterio-venous malformations managed successfully using NBCA and PVA and their midterm follow up. Case Report: Two cases were refereed to our interventional radiology department diagnosed by Doppler US and MRI as having uterine AVMs. The first cases presented with menometrorrhagia and significant blood loss during menstruation which necessitated blood transfusion on two separate episodes and refused to undergo hysterectomy. The second case presented in a state of hemodynamic shock following an attack of bleeding and had failed surgery due to extensive pelvic adhesions. Using standard endovascular techniques both uterine arteries were catheterized; glue was injected into the dominant feeding side and PVA was injected in the contralateral side. Both patients returned to their normal menstrual cycle with good control of bleeding. Clinical and radiological follow up was maintained for 29 month and 14 month for the cases, respectively. Conclusions: Endovascular management is a viable alternative in the control of uterine arterio-venous malformations in patients not eligible for surgery. Publication Date: 26 April 2021 (online) © 2017. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
Laura Sauerbeck, Charles J Moomaw, Jonathan Hancher, Richard Hornung, Robert Brown, Joseph P Broderick, The FIA Study Group
Published: 1 February 2012
Abstract:
Background Meeting Recruitment goals in a research study can be challenging. Recruitment for pedigree-based research, in which data and DNA are collected from genetically important family members, is especially difficult. The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study is a multicenter international study whose goal is to identify genetic and other risk factors for the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). The chosen sites for the study are major referral centers for the diagnosis and treatment of IAs. In this analysis, we sought to determine what factors caused a recruited family to be incomplete, and what impact the methods used in identifying families had on the successful completion of family enrollment. Methods Three recruitment strategies were utilized to identify and enroll families: prospective monitoring of every new case of IA, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or intracranial hemorrhage; retrospective review of IA cases; and advertisement on the Internet, in scientific journals, and at professional meetings. An unexpected additional source of recruitment was exposure to the study through the news media. To help with public accessibility to the study, a web site and toll free number were established. Families were eligible for the study if they fit one of 4 patterns: [1] ≥2 living siblings affected with IA; [2] ≥2 affected siblings, 1 living and 1 genotype reconstructed from living spouse and children; [3] ≥3 affected members, 2 living and 1 reconstructed; [4] ≥ 3 affected members, 1 living, ≥1 reconstructed, and ≥1 living connecting relative. Exclusion criteria included fusiform-shaped IA; IA part of an AVM; family history of polycystic kidney disease; Ehlers-Danlos, Marfan, or moyamoya syndrome; fibromuscular dysplasia; or failure to obtain informed consent. Results Between 8/2002 and 10/2007, 3771 IA patients were screened for family history, and 681 potential families were identified, of which 441 successfully completed enrollment. There were 240 families which did not complete enrollment, due to refusal to participate (97), inability to locate needed relatives (87), exclusion criteria (50), no reason documented (5), and duplication (1 recruited at two sites). Completion of study enrollment was not significantly different by recruitment category (p=.17): 191 of 311 prospectively-recruited (61%), 66 of 89 retrospective (74%), 95 of 145 advertisement (66%), and 89 of 136 methods not documented (65%) families successfully completed enrollment. Conclusion In our study, the major reason for family exclusion was the inability to enroll needed family members, through refusal or failure to locate. All three methods used to identify potential families were successful in completing eligible families. The combination of recruitment strategies can be effectively implemented in future studies.
, Erik Bee
Published: 26 April 2017
Presentation Abstracts, Volume 01; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1729795

Abstract:
Background: The global cosmetic market has been on the rise with a recent surge in minimally invasive procedures. Cosmetic interventional radiology (IR) offers less risk, pain and recovery time. This translates into better care at lower cost when compared to traditional surgery. Medical care is evolving into a minimally invasive specialty which provides interventional radiologists the unique opportunity to take part in the rapidly growing cosmetic medicine marketplace. Methods: Comprehensive literature review was performed to identify the scope of IR within cosmetic medicine. Common cosmetic procedures performed by IR, techniques used and their effectiveness are investigated. Results: Varicose vein treatment, laser lipolysis and liposuction are frequently performed. Additional procedures such as botulinum toxin (Botox) injections, collagen fillers, arterio-venous malformation (AVM) sclerotherapy, laser skin resurfacing and hyperhidrosis treatment are also gaining popularity. Recent advances in endovenous techniques including endovenous laser therapy (EVLT), radiofrequency ablation and sclerotherapy have been revolutionary. EVLT has a 98% success rate and a long-term recurrence rate <7%, surpassing the results produced by traditional vein stripping. Laser lipolysis and liposuction are alternatives to invasive weight loss procedures. Lipolysis has gained popularity due to a study conducted by DiBernardo et al. (2009) where lipolysis was found to have significantly higher mean size shrinkage and skin tightening when compared to traditional liposuction. Conclusions: As radiology's most innovative branch, IR has a broad landscape; thus, it is at an advantageous position to expand into the emerging field of cosmetic medicine. Cosmetic IR offers equal value with no surgical scar, shorter recovery and lower morbidity when compared to open surgery. Advances developed by IR has dramatically changed medicine. In the near future, it will do the same for cosmetic medicine by creating both new and enhancing existing techniques through image guided approach in order to deliver optimal patient care. Publication Date: 26 April 2021 (online) © 2017. The Arab Journal of Interventional Radiology. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Pvt. Ltd. A-12, 2nd Floor, Sector 2, Noida-201301 UP, India
Sibel Alagöz Ergüden
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences; https://doi.org/10.35229/jaes.781394

Abstract:
Tr en Balık biyolojisinde boy-ağırlık ve boy-boy ilişkileri oldukça önemlidir. Bu parametreler, stok durumu ve büyüme çalışmaları hakkında bilgi sağlamak içindir. Bu çalışmada, Güneydoğu Anadolu'da (Hatay, Türkiye) bulunan Luciobarbus pectoralis’in uzunluk-ağırlık ve uzunluk-uzunluk ilişkileri tespit edilmiştir. Eylül 2015 ve Mart 2016 tarihlerinde Asi Nehri (Orontes Nehri)'nden solungaç ağları ile toplam 125 (65 dişi ve 60 erkek) örnek yakalanmıştır. Tüm bireyler için örneklerin total boyu ve ağırlığı 15.5-38.0 cm ve 35.0-855 g arasında değişim gösterdi. Verilerin-ağırlık ilişkilerinin (LWR'ler) b üssi katsayısı, dişiler için 3.441 ve erkekler için 3.443 hesaplandı. Üç farklı uzunluk ölçümler (TL-FL-SL) arasındaki uzunluk-uzunluk ilişkisi (LLR'ler) yüksek derecede korelasyon bulunmdu (R2> 0.99, P Length-weight and length-length relationships are very important in fish biology. These parameters can provide information on the stock condition and growth studies. In this study, we report the length-weight and length-length relationships for Luciobarbus pectoralis in the Southeastern Anatolia (Hatay, Turkey). A total of 125 (65 female and 60 male) specimens were captured from Asi River (Orontes River) basin using gill nets in September 2015 and March 2016. The total length and weight of both sexes varied from 15.5-38.0 cm and 35.0-855 g. The values of the exponent b of the length-weight relationships (LWRs) were 3.441 for females and 3.443 for males. The length-length relationship (LLRs) between the three-length measurements (TL-FL-SL) were highly correlated (R2>0.99, P Anahtar Kelimeler tr en Cyprinidae,, boy,, ağırlık,, regresyon parametreleri,, Asi Nehir Havzası,, Hatay İli, Cyprinidae,, length,, weight,, regression parameters,, Orontes River Basin,, Hatay Province, Kaynakça Almaça, C. (1986). On some Barbus species from western Asia (Cyprinidae, Pisces). Annalen des Naturhistorischen Museums in Wien, 87, 5-30. Alp, A., Kara, C.H. Büyükçapar, M. & Bülbül, O. (2005). Age, growth and condition of Capoeta capoeta angorae, Hanko 1924 from the upper water systems of the River Ceyhan, Turkey. Turkish Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, 29, 665-676. Bagenal, T.B. & Tesch, F.W. (1978). Age and growth, In: Bagenal, T.B. (Ed), Methods for assessment of fish production in freshwaters, 3rd edition, 101-136p, Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, UK. Basiacik, S., Sari, H.M., Ilhan, A. & Ustaoglu, M.R. (2012). Some growth features of barbel fish population (Luciobarbus kottelati Turan, Ekmekçi, İlhan & Engin, 2008) in Adıgüzel Dam Lake (Denizli). Journal of FisheriesSciences.com, 6(1), 32-38. Doi: 10.3153/jfscom.2012005 Coban, M.Z., Turkgulu, I., Yuksel, F., Celayir, Y., Yuce, S., Eroğlu M. & Şen, D. (2012). Some biological characteristics of Luciobarbus esocinus Heckel, 1843 living in Keban Reservoir. Turkish Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 12, 73-80. Doi:/10.4194/1303-2712-v12_1_09 Dartay, M. & Gul, M.R. (2013). Length-weight relationships for five fish species Caught in Keban Dam Lake, Turkey. Journal of Applied Ichthyology, 30(1), 233-234. https://doi.org/10.1111/jai.12208 Erguden, S.A. (2016). Length-weight relationships for six freshwater fish species from the Seyhan Reservoir (south-eastern Anatolia, Turkey). Journal of Applied Ichthyology, 32, 141-143. Doi: 10.1111/jai.12905 Fricke, R., Bilecenoglu, M. & Sari, H.M. (2007). Annotated checklist of fish and Lamprey species (Gnathostoma and Petromyzontomorphi) of Turkey, including a Red List of threatened and declining dpecies. Stuttgarter Beiträgezur Naturkende Seria A (Biologie), 706, 1-172. Froese, R. (2006). Cube law, condition factor and weight-length relationships: History, meta-analysis and recommendations. Journal of Applied Ichthyology, 22, 241-253. Doi: 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2006.00805.x Froese, R. & Pauly, D. (2020). Fishbase. Worldwide web electronic publication. https://www.fishbase.se/summary/54714. (11.07.2020). Freyhof, J. (2014). Luciobarbus pectoralis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2014:e.T19383495A19848388. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.20141.RLTS.T19383495A19848388.en. (10.07.2020). Geldiay, R. & Balık, S. (1999). Türkiye tatlısu balıkları, Ege Üniversitesi Su Ürünleri Fakültesi Yayınları, No: 46, Ders Kitabı Dizini, No: 16, Izmir, Turkey, 532p. Goncalves, J.M.S., Bentes, L., Lino, P.G., Ribeiro, J., Canario, A.V.M. & Erzini, K. (1997). Weight-length relationships for selected fish species of the small-Scale demersal fisheries of the south and south-west coast of Portugal. Fisheries Research, 30, 253-256 .Doi: 10.1016/S0165-7836(96)00569-3 Hedayati, S.A., Farsani, H.G. & Gerami, M.H. (2016). Length-weight relationships of two fish species from Gamasiab Reservoir, western Iran: Alburnus mossulensis Heckel, 1843 and Luciobarbus esocinus Heckel, 1843. 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Weight-length relationships for 50 selected fish species of the Algarve coast (southern Portugal). Fisheries Research, 59, 289-295. Doi: 10.1016/S0165-7836(01)00401-5 Tarkan, A.S.,Gaygusuz, O., Acipinar, H. Gürsoy, C. & Ozulug, M. (2006). Length-weight relationship of fishes from the Marmara region (NW-Turkey). Journal of Applied Ichthyology, 22, 271-273. Doi: 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2006.00711.x Tesch, F.W. (1971). Age and growth, In: Ricker W.E. (Ed), Methods for assessment of fish production in fresh waters, 98-130p. Oxford, Blackwell Scientific Publications, UK. Turan, D., Ekmekçi, F. G., İlhan, A. & Engin, S. (2008). Luciobarbus kottelati, A new species of barbel (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) from the Büyük Menderes River, Turkey, with Rediagnose of L. lydianus. Zootaxa, 1824, 35-44. Doi: 10.5281/zenodo.183072 Wootton, R.J. (1998). Ecology of teleost fishes, 2nd Edition, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, Boston, 386p. Ayrıntılar Birincil Dil en Konular Fen Yazarlar Orcid: 0000-0002-9061-9581Yazar: Sibel ALAGÖZ ERGÜDEN (Sorumlu Yazar) Kurum: Çukurova University, Imamoglu Vocational School, Fisheries Department, 01700, Imamoglu, Adana, TurkeyÜlke: Turkey Teşekkür I would like to thank Murat Devecili for his assistance. Tarihler Başvuru Tarihi : 17 Ağustos 2020 Kabul Tarihi : 10 Eylül 2020 Yayımlanma Tarihi : 12 Eylül 2020 Kaynak Göster Bibtex @araştırma makalesi { jaes781394, journal = {Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences}, issn = {}, eissn = {2548-0006}, address = {}, publisher = {Bülent VEREP}, year = {}, pages = { - }, doi = {10.35229/jaes.781394}, title = {Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey}, key = {cite}, author = {Alagöz Ergüden, Sibel} } APA Alagöz Ergüden, S . (). Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey . Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences , , . DOI: 10.35229/jaes.781394 MLA Alagöz Ergüden, S . "Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey" . Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences ( ): Chicago Alagöz Ergüden, S . "Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey". Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences ( ): RIS TY - JOUR T1 - Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey AU - Sibel Alagöz Ergüden Y1 - 2020 PY - 2020 N1 - doi: 10.35229/jaes.781394 DO - 10.35229/jaes.781394 T2 - Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - EP - SN - -2548-0006 M3 - doi: 10.35229/jaes.781394 UR - https://doi.org/10.35229/jaes.781394 Y2 - 2020 ER - EndNote %0 Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey %A Sibel Alagöz Ergüden %T Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey %D 2020 %J Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences %P -2548-0006 %R doi: 10.35229/jaes.781394 %U 10.35229/jaes.781394 ISNAD Alagöz Ergüden, Sibel . "Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey". Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences - . https://doi.org/10.35229/jaes.781394 AMA Alagöz Ergüden S . Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey. JAES. -. Vancouver Alagöz Ergüden S . Length-Weight and Length-Length Relationships of the Levantine Barbel Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel, 1843) in Asi River, Turkey. Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences. -.
Nguyen Thi Binh Phuong, Van Pham Dang Tri, Nguyen Ba Duy,
VIETNAM JOURNAL OF EARTH SCIENCES, Volume 39; https://doi.org/10.15625/0866-7187/39/3/10270

Abstract:
In this study, the method of Fault Movement Potential (FMP) proposed by Lee et al. (1997) is used to assess the Surface water resources played a fundamental role in sustainable development of agriculture and aquaculture. They were the main sectors contributing to economic development in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta. Monitoring surface water quality was also one of the essential missions especially in the context of increasing freshwater demands and loads of wastewater fluxes. Recently, remote sensing technology has been widely applied in monitoring and mapping water quality at a regional scale replacing traditional field-based approaches. The aims of this study were to assess the application of the Landsat 8 (OLI) images for estimating Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) as well as detecting spatial changes of the COD concentration in river reaches of the Binh Dai district, Ben Tre province, a downstream area of the delta. The results indicated the significant correlation (R=0.89) between the spectral reflectance values of Landsat 8 and the COD concentration by applying the Artificial Neuron Network (ANN) approach. In addition, the spatial distribution of the COD concentration was found slightly exceeded the national standard for irrigation according to the B1 column of QCVN 08:2015. References Ackerman S., Richard F., Kathleen S., Yinghui L., Chris M., Liam G., Bryan B., and Paul M., 2010. Discriminating clear-sky from cloud with MODIS algorithm theoretical basis document (MOD35). Ali Sheikh A.A., Ghorbanali A., and Nouri N., 2007. Coastline change detection using remote sensing. International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology 4(1), 61-66. Bonansea M., María C. R., Lucio P., and Susana F., 2015. Using multi-temporal Landsat imagery and linear mixed models for assessing water quality parameters in Río Tercero reservoir (Argentina). Remote Sensing of Environment 158, 28-41. 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, Guofeng Chen,
Published: 3 July 2020
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Corrigendum
Alja Lüdke, Georg Raiser, Johannes Nehrkorn, Andreas V. M. Herz, C. Giovanni Galizia, Paul Szyszka
Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3389/fncel.2018.00197

Abstract:
A corrigendum onCalcium in Kenyon Cell Somata as a Substrate for an Olfactory Sensory Memory in Drosophilaby Lüdke, A., Raiser, G., Nehrkorn, J., Herz, A. V. M., Galizia, C. G., and Szyszka, P. (2018). Front. Cell. Neurosci. 12:128. doi: 10.3389/fncel.2018.00128 In the original article, we did not indicate the number of analyzed animals and glomeruli/somata/ROIs. We provide this information below: Figures 2, 3, and 7: ORN axons: N = 9 flies, n = 85 glomeruli (glomeruli per fly: 11, 11, 10, 5, 10, 10, 7, 10, 11) PN dendrites: N = 10 flies, n = 88 glomeruli (glomeruli per fly: 9, 5, 8, 9, 11, 10, 10, 12, 7, 7) [In Figures 3C–F the N and n for the odors EACE (N = 3, n = 22) and MCH (N = 7, n = 66) in PN dendrites is lower, since these odors were used alternately]. Figure 4 and Supplementary Figure S2: (same flies as above, with one additional fly and thirteen additional glomeruli in ORN axons): ORN axons: N = 10 flies, n = 98 glomeruli (glom. per fly: 11, 11, 10, 6, 10, 10, 10, 9, 10, 11) PN dendrites: N = 10 flies, n = 88 glomeruli (glom. per fly: 9, 5, 8, 9, 11, 10, 10, 12, 7, 7) Figures 5, 6: PN somata: N = 10 flies, n = 108 somata (somata per fly: 18, 15, 13, 5, 13, 10, 9, 9, 12, 4) KC dendrites: N = 6 flies, n = 343 ROIs (ROIs per fly: 57, 35, 31, 60, 84, 76) KC somata: N = 9 flies, n = 339 somata (somata per fly: 47, 28, 26, 52, 44, 23, 3, 55, 61) (In Figures 6C–F and Supplementary Figure S3 the N and n in the PN somata and KC somata matrices vary for each odor pair, because not every odor was analyzable in every fly. PN somata: N = 4–10 flies, n = 47–108 somata; KC somata: N = 5–8 flies, n = 217–313 somata). Figure 7: PN somata: N = 2 flies, n = 25 somata (somata per fly: 13, 12) KC dendrites: N = 6 flies, n = 343 ROIs (ROIs per fly: 57, 35, 31, 60, 84, 76) KC somata: N = 5 flies, n = 217 somata (somata per fly: 47, 28, 26, 55, 61) (Note that for the SVM we could only use flies with complete data for the same set of odorants (ButL, AceA, ProL, ProA, MO), hence the lower N in PN somata and KC somata). In the original article the following reference was incorrectly cited as “unpublished”. The corrected reference appears below: Betkiewicz, R. L., Lindner, B., and Nawrot, M. P. (2017). Circuit and cellular mechanisms facilitate the transformation from dense to sparse coding in the insect olfactory system. BioRxiv [Preprint]. doi: 10.1101/240671 We apologize for this missing information and emphasize that this does not change the scientific conclusions of the article in any way. The original article has been updated. The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. Keywords: Drosophila melanogaster, olfaction, sensory memory, mushroom body, Kenyon cells, trace conditioning, calcium imaging Citation: Lüdke A, Raiser G, Nehrkorn J, Herz AVM, Galizia CG and Szyszka P (2018) Corrigendum: Calcium in Kenyon Cell Somata as a Substrate for an Olfactory Sensory Memory in Drosophila. Front. Cell. Neurosci. 12:197. doi: 10.3389/fncel.2018.00197 Received: 08 June 2018; Accepted: 18 June 2018; Published: 03 July 2018. Edited and reviewed by: Dieter Wicher, Max-Planck-Institut für chemische Ökologie, Germany Reviewed by: Copyright © 2018 Lüdke, Raiser, Nehrkorn, Herz, Galizia and Szyszka. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. *Correspondence: Alja Lüdke, [email protected]
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