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(searched for: 10.29328/journal.apmh.1001033)
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Tanwattanakul Jirawon, Pairojkul Sriveing, Kamnuansilpa Peerasit, Sritanyaratana Wanapa, Santiboon Toansakul Tony
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 033-041; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001033

Abstract:
According to raising teenage parents though their abusing and neglecting children at a rural community with the ethnographic qualitative research method was surveyed. All children have protected on violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation from their teenage parents. To investigate and emphasize the consequences of violence ranged from immediate to the impact of their development on physical injury, learning ability, and local child care performance to long-term harm that caregivers carry into adult life is affected for raising children. Administration to the 89-households’ families and household memberships, 10 house stakeholders, 8 community leaders, 36 children, 65 caregivers, teenage parents and grandparents, and 3 mentors. Using the ethnographic qualitative research participatory with observation, natural conversation and in-depth interviews were randomized in rural Northeastern Region, Thailand. There are 52% of children being sexually, physically, or psychologically abused, neglected per day. Most of the teenagers’ education is poor learning skills, low academic learning achievements, and independent freedom of their sexual behaviors. These sexual intercourses between their groups are normal. Adding gambling habits among friends and adult groups are amputated without parents to dissuade. Either lifestyles as freely with sexually and gambling and the basic education are stopped, experiences’ living skills are poorly. Teenage women are changed to pregnant and young mothers. The teenage men must be searched for the job without a lack of worker’s skills to look for children with whom they are conflicted family relationships to take care.
, Andrea McIlvena
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 53, pp 17-21; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20150622-03

Abstract:
Aging Matters Paul Sadler, MAPS, CCLP; Andrea McIlvena, RN, CMHN Community Aged Intensive Recovery (CAIR) programs are an integral part of Aged Persons Mental Health Services (APMHS); however, no study has investigated whether a rural-based intensive program benefits older clients with severe mental illness. The current sample comprised 119 older adults who were being managed by a CAIR program from July 2011 to June 2013. Three key results were found: (a) approximately three quarters of clients admitted to the CAIR program remained treated in the community; (b) the program assisted in significantly reducing the level of psychiatric symptom severity from CAIR entry to CAIR exit; and (c) the APMHS team with the CAIR program had a lower psychiatric inpatient rate compared to the APMHS team without the program. The current study highlights the importance of delivering effective rural-based CAIR programs to older adults experiencing severe mental illness. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(9), 17–21.] Mr. Sadler is Clinical Psychologist, and Ms. McIlvena is Mental Health Nurse and Team Leader, Latrobe Regional Hospital’s South West Gippsland Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Wonthaggi Hospital, Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia. Ms. McIlvena is the team leader of the Community Aged Intensive Recovery (CAIR) program, and Paul Sadler consults within Latrobe Regional Hospital’s Aged Persons Mental Health Service. The authors acknowledge the late Associate Professor Bruce Osborne (Psychogeriatrician) who pioneered and introduced the CAIR program to rural Victoria, Australia. The authors thank Latrobe Regional Hospital for supporting the CAIR program as well as the clients and their carers for participating. The authors also acknowledge the skill and dedication of each mental health practitioner who works in community rural aged psychiatry. Address correspondence to Paul Sadler, MAPS, CCLP, Clinical Psychologist, Latrobe Regional Hospital’s South West Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Wonthaggi Hospital, Graham Street, Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia, 3995; e-mail: [email protected] 10.3928/02793695-20150622-03 Community Aged Intensive Recovery (CAIR) programs are an integral part of Aged Persons Mental Health Services (APMHS); however, no study has investigated whether a rural-based intensive program benefits older clients with severe mental illness. The current sample comprised 119 older adults who were being managed by a CAIR program from July 2011 to June 2013. Three key results were found: (a) approximately three quarters of clients admitted to the CAIR program remained treated in the community; (b) the program assisted in significantly reducing the level of psychiatric symptom severity from CAIR entry to CAIR exit; and (c) the APMHS team with the CAIR program had a lower psychiatric inpatient rate compared to the APMHS team without the program. The current study highlights the importance of delivering effective rural-based CAIR programs to older adults experiencing severe mental illness. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(9), 17–21.] Mr. Sadler is Clinical Psychologist, and Ms. McIlvena is Mental Health Nurse and Team Leader, Latrobe Regional Hospital’s South West Gippsland Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Wonthaggi Hospital, Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia. Ms. McIlvena is the team leader of the Community Aged Intensive Recovery (CAIR) program, and Paul Sadler consults within Latrobe Regional Hospital’s Aged Persons Mental Health Service. The authors acknowledge the late Associate Professor Bruce Osborne (Psychogeriatrician) who pioneered and introduced the CAIR program to rural Victoria, Australia. The authors thank Latrobe Regional Hospital for supporting the CAIR program as well as the clients and their carers for participating. The authors also acknowledge the skill and dedication of each mental health practitioner who works in community rural aged psychiatry. Address correspondence to Paul Sadler, MAPS, CCLP, Clinical Psychologist, Latrobe Regional Hospital’s South West Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Wonthaggi Hospital, Graham Street, Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia, 3995; e-mail: [email protected]
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