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(searched for: 10.29328/journal.apcr.1001027)
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, Nuruddin Murtuza
Archives of Pathology and Clinical Research, Volume 5, pp 037-041; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apcr.1001027

Abstract:
Purpose: To evaluate the presentation and outcome of periocular capillary hemangioma treated with low-dose oral propranolol. Method: Thirty cases of periocular capillary hemangioma prospectively studied from 1st June 2015 to 31st May 2017 who received oral propranolol on an outpatient basis. Hemangioma causing any threat to vision or disfigurement was included and age below 3 months and multiple lesions were excluded. Starting dose of propranolol was 1 mg/kg and increased to 2 mg/kg after 2 weeks as a maintenance dose. The tapering dose was 1 mg/kg of body weight before discontinuing the medication. Treatment was continued till the child is 1 year of age or no further change in color or size of the lesion in two successive follow-ups. Results: Presenting age was 6.36 ± 3.36 months (ranged 3–24 months) with female predominance (70%). In 86.6% of cases, the vision was Central Steady and Maintained and cycloplegic refraction showed marked astigmatism in 3 children which resolved after treatment. Forty-six percent of children showed color change as an initial response to treatment. Most children (33.3%) responded completely within 5 months after starting the treatment. One third patients (33.3%) showed 100% resolution, 50% showed 90% to 70% resolution. Pretreatment and post-treatment lesion size was1.60 ± 0.86 cm2 and 0.30 ± 0.40 cm2 respectively (p - value < 0.0005). None showed any significant adverse effect of oral propranolol. Conclusion: Low-dose oral propranolol is an effective and cost-effective treatment modality for periocular capillary hemangioma and is safe as an outpatient basis.
Journal of Environmental Engineering and Science, Volume 5, pp 335-348; https://doi.org/10.1139/s06-016

Abstract:
Air pollution control residues (APCR) from municipal waste incinerators are usually considered as hazardous wastes because of their high contents in easily soluble Pb and other toxic metal contaminants. The objective of this research was to compare various techniques using Pb adsorption on Sphagnum peat moss (MT) for the treatment of alkaline leachates produced during the decontamination of various types of APCR including used lime (CU), electrofilter ashes (CE), and boiler ashes (CC). Regeneration tests of saturated MT using hydrochloric and sulphuric acids have revealed that excessive acid consumption (>250 kg acid/metric ton of treated APCR) are necessary for the elution of metals. However, the incineration of the saturated MT and its possible valorization represents an interesting way to explore for the management of the adsorbent. This method allows to reduce by a factor of 3 or 4 the mass of residues and increases in the same proportion the Pb content in the incinerated MT. Finally, the present study has highlighted that ion exchange on the anionic functional groups of MT would be one of the most important mechanisms implied in the Pb fixation on this natural sorbent during the treatment of very alkaline leachates (pH > 11) of APCR.Key words: lead, leaching, incinerator, air pollution control residues (APCR), removal, peat, adsorption, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP).[Journal translation]
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