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(searched for: 10.29328/journal.abse.1001012)
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C Nagendraswamy, Salis Amogh
Annals of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Volume 5, pp 013-014; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.abse.1001012

Abstract:
Artificial intelligence (AI) is the emulation of human intelligence in computers that have been trained to think and behave like humans. The word may also refer to any computer that exhibits human-like characteristics like learning and problem-solving. Artificial intelligence is intelligence demonstrated by machines, as opposed to natural intelligence, which involves consciousness and emotionality and is demonstrated by humans and animals [1].
Maria Do Socorro Furtado Veloso
Revista Extraprensa, Volume 1; https://doi.org/10.5841/extraprensa.v1i1e.67

Abstract:
The history reconstitution of Jornal Pessoal is the main goal of this paper. Considered as the most important and lasting experience of alternative journalism in Amazon, the newspaper has been leaded by the journalist Lúcio Flávio Pinto lonely, for 23 years. Created in 1987, in Belém (PA), it represents a model of counter-hegemonic press in Brazil in the post dictatorship period and proposes a new agenda refused by Para’s mainstream media. The Jornal Pessoal has the abse nce of advertising as one of its most important characteristics. Its editorial guideline is inspired in the I.F Stone’s Weekly, self-published for 19 years in U.S.A, by the journalist Isidore Stone. JP’s history, that survives in spite of coordinated justice trials, its interests fields, and his concerns about the foundations and practice of journalism are the axes of this investigation, that uses documental and bibliographic research, and interview. A reconstituição da trajetória do Jornal Pessoal é o objetivo central deste artigo. Considerado a mais importante e longeva experiência alternativa do jornalismo praticado na Amazônia brasileira, o periódico é conduzido solitariamente pelo jornalista Lúcio Flávio Pinto há 23 anos. Criado em 1987, em Belém (PA), busca impor uma agenda de debates recusada pela grande imprensa paraense. Tem na ausência de publicidade uma de suas principais características. A linha editorial é inspirada no I.F Stone’s Weekly, um semanário produzido durante 19 anos nos EUA, pelo jornalista Isidore Stone. A história do Jornal Pessoal, que sobrevive a despeito de uma intensa campanha de processos na Justiça, seus campos de interesse, e suas preocupações quanto aos fundamentos e ao exercício da profissão são os eixos de investigação do estudo, que utiliza como procedimentos metodológicos a pesquisa documental e bibliográfica, e entrevista.
T Abse
History Workshop Journal, Volume 42, pp 239-241; https://doi.org/10.1093/hwj/1996.42.239

Abstract:
T Abse; Review. Women and Italian fascism. The clockwork factory: women and work in fascist Italy, Perry R Wilson, History Workshop Journal, Volume 1996, Issue
Tobias Abse
History Workshop Journal, Volume 39, pp 230-232; https://doi.org/10.1093/hwj/39.1.230

Abstract:
TOBIAS ABSE; REVIEWS, History Workshop Journal, Volume 39, Issue 1, 1 March 1995, Pages 230–232, https://doi.org/10.1093/hwj/39.1.230
D Cameron
Published: 29 October 1994
by BMJ
BMJ, Volume 309, pp 1172-1173; https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.309.6962.1172a

Abstract:
Dannie Abse Seren (Poetry Wales Press), £14.95, pp 255 ISBN 1–85411–108–6 The last time I walked along the beach at Ogmore in South Glamorgan I was depressed by the muddy Bristol Channel and by the debris - a disposable nappy wallowing at the water's edge, and a slight oily film on the rock pools. My youngest child was entranced by a one clawed crab, a victim perhaps of senseless seagull brutality or a mutant tribute to pollution. But for Dannie Abse in Intermittent Journals the beach at Ogmore is a rainswept spiritual home, a place of secure memories …
Tobias Abse
History Workshop Journal, Volume 33, pp 263-264; https://doi.org/10.1093/hwj/33.1.263

Abstract:
TOBIAS ABSE; REVIEWS, History Workshop Journal, Volume 33, Issue 1, 1 March 1992, Pages 263–264, https://doi.org/10.1093/hwj/33.1.263
Richard Selzer
Published: 1 January 1991
Literature and Medicine, Volume 10, pp 34-41; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2011.0103

Abstract:
^An Expostulation Richard Selzer In the seven years between my first reading of volume 3 of Literature and Medicine and my rereading of it now, the journal has reached its puberty, and I my crabby senescence. In 1984 the idea of an issue devoted to the work of physician-writers seemed a good one.1 It was only natural that teachers and scholars be drawn to the work of writing doctors. Here were the stories, poems, and essays of physicians who were alive and probably writing at that moment! The authors were not remote; they were almost present in the classroom. Since the subject of our writings was apt to be our work as doctors, medical students, we thought, would more easily relate to them. There would be the shock of recognition, the ring of authenticity. Too, there was the long history of doctor-writers that we reached out eagerly to claim; it was, after all, our heritage. And, let me be honest, it is tempting for us who are writing to see ourselves in the continuum of that tradition. One's heart was gladdened by a volume in which John Stone and Dannie Abse were getting the attention they so richly deserved, and in which the dashing, energetic Michael Halberstam, so tragically murdered, was being eulogized in noble language. In addition , there was yet another article on William Carlos Williams's "The Use of Force," and an assortment of essays on Walker Percy and Dannie Abse. Halberstam, Abse, and Stone were shown, each handsome as coin, in full-page smiling photographic portraits. What a feast for anyone laboring in the vineyard of literature and medicine! Why, then, does this volume, which seemed like such a prize seven years ago, seem now to be merely well-intentioned? Perhaps it is that the enthusiasms of childhood are no longer to be indulged in the teenager. Let us have a look: Of the 168 pages of text that volume 3 comprises, seventeen are taken up with a eulogy of Michael Halberstam and a brief exchange of letters between Halberstam and Russell Baker and one J. Willard Colston, an editor for the New York Times Syndicate, to whom Halberstam is presenting his credentials as a columnist. Michael Halberstam, by all accounts, was a brilliant doctor, an energetic, right-thinking man, and a charismatic figure. One should like to have known him. But is his literary output of the caliber that ought to be so large a concern—one-tenth of Literature and Medicine 10 (1991) 34-41 © 1991 by The Johns Hopkins University Press Richard Selzer 35 an issue, after all—to the primary organ of scholarship in the discipline? He wrote one novel, The Wanting of Levine, which I have recently read, and a number of timely articles on medicine, society, and ethics that are examples of feisty journalism. About the novel, I will not comment other than to say that it is a peppy, superficial, and stylish performance that simply cannot be taken seriously as a piece of literature. It was tactful of Howard Tucker in his eulogy to refrain from commentary and to settle for a brief outline of the plot of The Wanting of Levine. Likewise, a careful reading of Russell Baker's letter to Michael Halberstam shows him to be equally neutral. The novel "reads damn fast," he writes, and "this ... is good" (p. 96). Baker goes on to write the author encouragingly on the possibility of a movie. This is followed by a couple of mildly negative remarks and a descent into facetiousness. It is clear that Michael Halberstam was included in this volume precisely because he was a doctor who was writing. That is not a good enough reason. Just because kittens are born in an oven, that does not make them loaves of bread. If this journal is to remain the voice of criticism in the field for which it is named, it must dispense with the notion that being a doctor is anything but incidental to the making of art. Writers who are also doctors must be held as rigidly to account as all other writers. To think otherwise would surely, in time, invalidate...
Tobias Abse
History Workshop Journal, Volume 24, pp 187-191; https://doi.org/10.1093/hwj/24.1.187

Abstract:
TOBIAS ABSE; Migration, Class Formation and Radicalism in Nineteenth-Century France, History Workshop Journal, Volume 24, Issue 1, 1 October 1987, Pages 187–19
Published: 1 January 1984
Literature and Medicine, Volume 3, pp 167-168; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2011.0121

Abstract:
Contributors Dannie Abse, M.D., lives in London and reads his poems around the world. He continues to write in a variety of forms. Russell Baker, a Pulitzer Prize winner, as well as the recipient of numerous other awards, is a columnist with the New York Times. Barbara Currier Bell has taught at Wesleyan University, where she was co-founder of their Science in Society program. D. Heyward Brock, who conducted the Abse interview in London, is a member of the Department of English, University of Delaware, and an Associate Editor of Literature and Medicine. Michael Collins is Dean of the School of Summer and Continuing Education at Georgetown University. Michael Halberstam is survived, in Washington, D.C, by his wife Elliott Jones, and a host of friends and memories. Grace Herman, M.D., has read her poems widely. She is a graduate of Columbia's College of Physicians and Surgeons, and practices occupational medicine. Daniel Hoffman, the noted poet and scholar, is currently writing a book on William Faulkner on a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is a former Poet in Residence at the Library of Congress. Martin Kohn is coordinator of Human Values in Medicine at the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine. Norman Kreitman, Μ.Ό., a psychiatrist in Edinburgh, is also a well-known Scottish poet. Susan V. Lawrence, a graduate of St. John's College, lives and writes in Washington, D.C. Lewis A. Lawson, who has written extensively on Walker Percy, is a member of the Department of English at the University of Maryland. Jane Byers Moss, a prolific writer with a particular interest in Canadian Literature, is an Assistant Professor of Modern Languages at Colby College. William B. Ober, M. D., is Director of Laboratories, Emeritus, at Hackensack Hospital in New Jersey. He is a Contributing Editor of Literature and Medicine. Glenn Saltzman, Ph.D., participated in the selection of the medical students' poetry. John Stone, M.D., a Contributing Editor of Literature and Medicine, lives in Atlanta and works at the Emory University School of Medicine. 26S CONTRIBUTORS Howard McK. Tucker, an international investment authority, has written elsewhere on Michael Halberstam, and published articles in various journals, including the Washington Post. Delese Wear is a Program Associate, Human Values in Medicine, at the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine. ...
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