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Yoshihiro Watanabe, Yukihiro Asami, Satomi Narusawa, Shohei Hashimoto, Masato Iwatsuki, Kenichi Nonaka, Yasuo Shinohara, Takahiro Shiotsuki, Naoya Ichimaru, Hideto Miyoshi, et al.
Published: 11 October 2017
The Journal of Antibiotics, Volume 71, pp 146-148; https://doi.org/10.1038/ja.2017.118

Abstract:
A new lanostane-type triterpenoid, ascosteroside D, was isolated from a fungus, Aspergillus sp. FKI-6682. It inhibited insect ADP/ATP carrier protein (AAC)-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae in glycerol-containing medium, but did not inhibit Δaac S. cerevisiae in glucose-containing medium. It is hypothesized that ascosteroside D inhibits ATP production in mitochondria.The Journal of Antibiotics advance online publication, 11 October 2017; doi:10.1038/ja.2017.118.
Charmian Brinson, Marian Malet, Sally Crawford, , Jaś Elsner
Published: 9 March 2017
Abstract:
Rudolf Olden was one of the best-known journalists and lawyers of the Weimar Republic; because of his anti-Nazi stance, he was compelled to flee Germany in 1933. Contacts with the AAC led to Olden being offered a cottage in the grounds of Gilbert Murray’s house, on the outskirts of Oxford, and to some lecturing at Oxford University. This chapter examines Olden’s activities during the five years he spent in Oxford, when he attempted to warn the British through his journalism, books, teaching, and speaking engagements of the dangers of National Socialism. Through his honorary secretaryship of German PEN (Poets, Essayists, Novelists) in Exile, he was also able to help a number of writers wishing to come to Britain. He played a significant role in campaigns on behalf of fellow journalists held in German concentration camps, such as Berthold Jacob and Carl von Ossietzky, drawing on his Oxford connections.
Published: 25 August 2010
Journal of Cancer Education, Volume 25, pp 273-274; https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-010-0150-6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sina Jasim
Published: 1 January 2022
Aace Clinical Case Reports, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aace.2021.12.004

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 9 January 2007
Journal: Cheminform
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sina Jasim
Published: 28 August 2021
Aace Clinical Case Reports, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aace.2021.08.003

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
George E. Saulnier, Janna C. Castro,
Published: 1 March 2014
Endocrine Practice, Volume 20, pp 207-212; https://doi.org/10.4158/ep13186.or

Abstract:
Rapid Electronic Articles in Press are preprinted manuscripts that have been reviewed and accepted for publication, but have yet to be edited, typeset and finalized. This version of the manuscript will be replaced with the final, published version after it has been published in the print edition of the journal. The final, published version may differ from this proof. DOI:10.4158/EP13186.OR © 2013 AACE
Published: 1 October 2009
At – Automatisierungstechnik, Volume 57, pp 535-536; https://doi.org/10.1524/auto.2009.9072

Abstract:
Article Advances in Automotive Control AAC 2010 was published on October 1, 2009 in the journal at - Automatisierungstechnik (volume 57, issue 10).
Published: 1 January 2004
Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Volume 20, pp 194-208; https://doi.org/10.1080/07434610400010960

Abstract:
This metadata relates to an electronic version of an article published in Augmentative and alternative communication, 2004, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 194-208. Augmentative and alternative communication is available online at informaworldTM at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/07434618.asp
Clémence Simon, Corentin Spriet, Simon Hawkins, Cedric Lion
Published: 26 January 2018
Journal of Visualized Experiments; https://doi.org/10.3791/56947-v

Abstract:
Lignin is one of the most prevalent biopolymers on the planet and a major component of lignocellulosic biomass. This phenolic polymer plays a vital structural and protective role in the development and life of higher plants. Although the intricate mechanisms regulating lignification processes in vivo strongly impact the industrial valorization of many plant-derived products, the scientific community still has a long way to go to decipher them. In a simple three-step workflow, the dual labeling protocol presented herein enables bioimaging studies of actively lignifying zones of plant tissues. The first step consists in the metabolic incorporation of two independent chemical reporters, surrogates of the two native monolignols that give rise to lignin H- and G-units. After incorporation into growing lignin polymers, each reporter is then specifically labeled with its own fluorescent probe via a sequential combination of bioorthogonal SPAAC/CuAAC click reactions. Combined with lignin autofluorescence, this approach leads to the generation of three-color localization maps of lignin within plant cell walls by confocal fluorescence microscopy and provides precise spatial information on the presence or absence of active lignification machinery at the scale of plant tissues, cells and different cell wall layers.
The Asha Leader, Volume 20, pp 18-18; https://doi.org/10.1044/leader.rib2.20042015.18

Abstract:
Children with severe, congenital speech impairments who use augmentative and alternative communication may benefit from direct intervention involving yes/no questions, shows new research published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention, Volume 7, pp 52-56; https://doi.org/10.1080/17489539.2013.809900

Abstract:
Gadberry, A. L. (2011). A survey of the use of aided augmentative and alternative communication during music therapy sessions with persons with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Music Therapy, 48, 74–89. Source of funding and disclosure of interest: No source of funding reported, and no conflicts of interest reported by the original authors of this research report.
Joseph O'Donnell
Published: 17 May 2007
Journal of Cancer Education, Volume 21, pp 196-197; https://doi.org/10.1080/08858190701353026

Abstract:
Providing researchers with access to millions of scientific documents from journals, books, series, protocols and reference works.
Moritz Lönhoff, Hamid Sadegh Azar
International Journal of Masonry Research and Innovation, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.1504/ijmri.2020.106304

Abstract:
Inderscience Publishers: publishers of distinguished academic, scientific and professional journals.
Jennifer Kent-Walsh,
Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Volume 34, pp 93-103; https://doi.org/10.1080/07434618.2018.1456560

Abstract:
Since its inception in 1985, the AAC journal has been publishing scientific articles related to the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) that (a) report research concerning assessment, treatment, rehabilitation, and education of people who use or have the potential to use AAC systems and (b) cover theory, technology, and systems development relevant to AAC. The journal has maintained a consistent focus on the science and practice of AAC while also advancing in varied and impressive ways. Among the many developments apparent in AAC over the years, methodological advancements emerge as pivotal within the evolution of the science of AAC. This report examines the state of the science in behavioral AAC research with specific regard to changes and opportunities in research methodology. Illustrations from articles published in Volume 1 (1985) and Volume 32 (2016) of AAC are used in this paper to frame commentary on (a) contextual consideration in conducting AAC research, (b) types of research design, (c) considerations of procedural rigor, and (d) future methodological directions and resources. If the AAC field is to meet the goal of ensuring that all individuals with complex communication needs achieve their full potential, meaningful questions must be posed to address key problems, and rigorous scientific methods must be employed to answer these questions.
Innovations in Education and Training International, Volume 36, pp 351-360; https://doi.org/10.1080/1355800990360411

Abstract:
The Journal of Interactive Learning Research (JILR)is published by the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). AACE is based in Charlottesville, USA (http://www.aace.org) and produces a number of journals relating to applications of computing and telecommunications within education. Recently, a special double‐issue of JILRwas produced (Volume 8, Issues 3/4, 1997) which was devoted to the topic of ‘concept mapping’. This paper analyses and critically reviews the ten papers contained in that special issue.
Ian Phillips, Kevin Shannon
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Volume 3, pp 621-621; https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/3.6.621

Abstract:
IAN PHILLIPS, KEVIN SHANNON; AAC (2) versus AAC (6), Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Volume 3, Issue 6, 1 November 1977, Pages 621, https://doi.org/10.1
Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Volume 31, pp 261-270; https://doi.org/10.3109/07434618.2015.1099736

Abstract:
For the past 30 years, the Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) journal has both documented and instigated change in the field of AAC. We reviewed the papers published in the AAC journal from1985–2014 in order to identify trends in research and publication activities. Intervention research made up the largest proportion of the four types of research (i.e., intervention, descriptive, experimental, and instrument and measurement development) reported in the journal. Intervention research has most commonly focused on the individual with complex communication needs, and most frequently on younger individuals (aged 17 and younger) with developmental disabilities. While much has been learned in the past 30 years, there continues to be a need for high quality research in a large number of areas. There is a special need for reports of interventions with older individuals with complex communication needs as a result of acquired disabilities, and for information on effective interventions for the communication partners of persons with complex communication needs.
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Volume 39, pp 1755-1756; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-009-0781-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Catia Walter
International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, Volume 67, pp 263-279; https://doi.org/10.1080/1034912x.2018.1515424

Abstract:
The effectiveness of using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) with individuals with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is well documented in descriptive reviews and meta-analytic investigations published in international journals in the last decade. Most of these analyses include researches conducted in North-American or European countries, where AAC has become an evidence-based practice. Little is known, however, about the use of AAC for individuals with ASD in developing countries. The purpose of this descriptive review was to elucidate how AAC has been used with individuals with ASD in Brazil. Nineteen studies, including dissertations, theses and journal articles, published in the last five years, were analysed. Results revealed the prevalence of low-technology AAC, with a significant portion using picture-exchange communication methods. The use of higher-technology devices was limited and none of the investigations used manual signs. Most were intervention studies that used primarily quasi-experimental designs to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention packages on school-aged children in natural settings. Strengths/weaknesses of the studies, overall limitations, and recommendations for future research are discussed.
Xenia Ribaya Emperador Garnace
People: International Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 3, pp 1320-1332; https://doi.org/10.20319/pijss.2018.33.13201332

Abstract:
This study presents a systematic literature review focusing on the Interrelationship of Language and the Brain and Language Disorders in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) based on a number of published researches in several refereed international journals available in various online databases. A repertory grid was utilized to plot the responses to the research questions posted. The data on the grid were analyzed to be able to identify the various gaps in the researches conducted. Consequently, this study yields the following concepts: the Role of Assistive Technology and Mediation, Interventions in AAC, and Focus on AAC Outcomes. It is concluded that these concepts should form part of the compendia to be used by language teachers, especially those specializing in psycholinguistics and AAC. Finally, the paper presents suggestions for further research into AAC and psycholinguistics per se.
Travis Threats
Perspectives of the Asha Special Interest Groups, Volume 1, pp 61-62; https://doi.org/10.1044/persp1.sig12.61

Abstract:
This Part of Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups concerns the use of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) with individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Serving as guest editor was a challenging task, considering the excellent special issue dealing with the ICF and AAC in a 2012 special edition of the journal Augmentative and Alternative Communication, with guest editors Drs. Melanie Fried-Oken and Mats Granlund. Readers interested in a comprehensive description of the use of the ICF with AAC are encouraged to read the articles in that issue. The articles in this Part further expand upon the implications of applying this framework in AAC.
, Miechelle McKelvey, , , Sarah Blackstone, , Julia Fischer, Kathryn Garrett, Lewis Golinker, Amber Thiessen, et al.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication pp 1-5; https://doi.org/10.1080/07434618.2022.2077831

Abstract:
On February 5, 2022, the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) lost a giant when Dr. David “Dave” Beukelman passed away. As the readership of this journal is aware, Dave was one of the principal founders of the AAC field and devoted his career to providing a voice to those without one. Before AAC became a field, people who could not talk were invisible or seldom noticed, unless they were in the way. For more than 40 years, he was a catalyst for change in AAC clinical practice, research, dissemination, teaching, and public policy development. This tribute aims to honor Dave’s lifelong mission of serving others by sharing some of his most timeless and valued lessons. Each lesson begins with one of Dave’s most enduring quotes that is then followed by a brief synopsis of the lesson Dave hoped to convey.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Volume 31, pp 181-202; https://doi.org/10.3109/07434618.2015.1064163

Abstract:
This article provides an overview of early intervention and AAC over the 30-year period since the founding of the journal Augmentative and Alternative Communication in 1985. It discusses the global context for early intervention and addresses issues pertaining to young children from birth to 6 years of age. It provides a narrative review and synthesis of the evidence base in AAC and early intervention. Finally, it provides implications for practice and future research directions.
Mohei Menul Islam, Muhammad Harunur Rashid, Aqib Muntasir
Journal of Engineering Science, Volume 12, pp 11-17; https://doi.org/10.3329/jes.v12i3.57475

Abstract:
Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) prepared by the mixing of ordinary Portland cement, lime powder, sand, aluminium powder and water. This study covers the variation of physical, mechanical and functional properties of autoclaved aerated concrete with autoclaving temperature and aluminium content and compared with that of normal weight cement mortar sample. In this work, two dosage of aluminium content of 0.4% and 0.8% of the dry weight of ordinary Portland cement and three different autoclaving temperature of 160oC, 180oC and 200oC were used. AAC sample with 0.8% aluminium and 160oC temperature had unit weight of 1490kg/m3 which was lowest among all samples including the control or normal weight cement blocks. Weight reduction of AAC sample was 31.53%. AAC sample with 0.4% aluminium and 200oC autoclaving temperature gave maximum compressive and tensile strength of 19.4MPa and 1.81MPa respectively which were close to that of normal weight concrete and strength of AAC increased with autoclaving temperature and decreased with aluminium content. In this research, the functional propertiesof AAC, absorption capacity was much higher than normal weight concrete and this capacity was increased with aluminium content and with decreasing autoclaving temperature and unit weight of AAC. For AAC with 0.8% aluminium and 160oC temperature gave maximum water absorption capacity (=9.93%). Again, surface absorption rate was higher for first 12hours and with time it would be constant because of its saturated position. Journal of Engineering Science 12(3), 2021, 11-17
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Volume 31, pp 2900-2919; https://doi.org/10.1044/2022_ajslp-21-00396

Abstract:
Introduction: Access to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems in languages other than English and multilingual AAC systems remains limited for many people with complex communication needs, despite a growing interest in this field, and an acknowledged need for culturally responsive AAC practice. Purpose: The purpose of this scoping review was to identify published research that has reported on the development of components or whole AAC systems in languages other than English, and the linguistic and cultural factors that influenced research methods and AAC system development. Method: Nine databases were systematically searched for published research that presented development of components or whole AAC systems in languages other than English. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool was used to assess the quality of studies. Charted data from studies included journal and publication date, research team, language of AAC system, aims of the study, study methodologies, study participants, and type of AAC systems developed. An analytical framework was developed to identify the cultural and linguistic factors that influenced research methods and or AAC system outcomes. Results: A total of 22 studies were included (13 qualitative, one quantitative nonrandomized, six quantitative descriptive, and two mixed-methods studies). Overall quality of studies was high. Some qualitative studies were of lower quality due to limited analysis or interpretation of results. Linguistic factors were extensively reported in the existing literature, whereas cultural factors were rarely explicitly reported. Conclusion: Factors contributing to lack of reporting of cultural considerations are posited with suggestions for future research. Supplemental Material: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.21482607
Comment
R. Vanhoof, , H. J. Nyssen, E. Hannecart-Pokorni
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Volume 34, pp 595-596; https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/34.4.595

Abstract:
R. VANHOOF, E. NULENS, H. J. NYSSEN, E. HANNECART-POKORNI; The utility of the PCR method to study aacA gene heterogeneity in Serratia marcescens, Journal of An
, Ahmad Ghasemi, , Kamran Dastehgoli, Maryam Rezaei
Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology, Volume 6; https://doi.org/10.5812/jjm.6244

Abstract:
Virulence Gene’s Relationship With Biofilm Formation and Detection of aac (6’)/aph (2”) in Enterococcus faecalis Isolated From Patients With Urinary Tract Infection - Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology - - Kowsar
, Roberto Pereira, Luciano Silva
Journal on Interactive Systems, Volume 9; https://doi.org/10.5753/jis.2018.704

Abstract:
Verbal communication is essential for socialization, meaning construction and knowledge sharing in a society. When verbal communication does not occur naturally because of constraints in people’s and environments capabilities, it is necessary to design alternative means. Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) aims to complement or replace speech to compensate difficulties of verbal expression. AAC systems can provide technological support for people with speech disorders, assisting in the inclusion, learning and sharing of experiences. This paper presents a systematic mapping of the literature to identify research initiatives regarding the use of mobile devices and AAC solutions. The search identified 1366 potentially eligible scientific articles published between 2006 and 2016, indexed by ACM, IEEE, Science Direct, and Springer databases and by the SBC Journal on Interactive Systems. From the retrieved papers, 99 were selected and categorized into themes of research interest: games, autism, usability, assistive technology, AAC, computer interfaces, interaction in mobile devices, education, among others. Most of papers (57 out of 99) presented some form of interaction via mobile devices, and 46 papers were related to assistive technology, from which 14 were related to AAC. The results offer an overview on the applied research on mobile devices for AAC, pointing out to opportunities and challenges in this research domain, with emphasis on the need to promoting the use and effective adoption of assistive technology.
Nathalie Iannotti, Lidia Gazzola, Alessia Savoldi, Elisa Suardi, Viola Cogliandro, Francesca Bai, Alberto Magenta, Mauro Peri, Teresa Bini, Giulia Marchetti, et al.
Published: 2 November 2014
Journal of the International Aids Society, Volume 17, pp 19715-19715; https://doi.org/10.7448/ias.17.4.19715

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Maria Antonella Costantino,
Published: 13 March 2014
Journal: PLOS ONE
Abstract:
Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) is used for treating children with severe disorders of speech-language production and/or comprehension. Various strategies are used, but research and debate on their efficacy have remained limited to a specific area and have rarely reached the general medical community. To systematically evaluate outcomes of AAC interventions in children with limited speech or language skills. Searches were conducted (up to December 2012) in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, DARE, and Cochrane Library databases. Furthermore, relevant journals were searched by hand. References from identified studies were examined. Only RCTs were considered. Trial quality was assessed according to a standardized and validated set of criteria. Fourteen of 1661 retrieved papers met inclusion criteria. A total of 666 children were included in the review and 7 papers involved only children <5 years old. Papers were of average quality and all but one had been published during the previous 10 years by one of 8 research groups, 5 of which from the United States. Seven studies directly addressed AAC use by children with different disabilities. Seven studies enrolled typically developing children: 5 evaluated the use of AAC technologies by children without disabilities in order to obtain results that could be used to improve interventions in peers with disabilities, and 2 evaluated peers’ attitudes towards children who used AAC. Both interventions and outcome measures varied widely between studies. Overall findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the AAC interventions considered, but the focus on RCTs alone appears too restrictive. Solid evidence of the positive effects of AAC interventions in children with severe communication disorders must be generated, and different methods are needed besides RCTs. Moreover, it is important that knowledge, research, and debate extend to the medical community in order to ensure clinically effective AAC provision for these children (and their parents).
, Diane Nelson Bryen
Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Volume 29, pp 174-181; https://doi.org/10.3109/07434618.2013.784805

Abstract:
The vocabulary needs of individuals who are unable to spell their messages continue to be of concern in the fi eld of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Social validation of vocabulary selection has been suggested as one way to improve the effectiveness and relevance of service delivery in AAC. Despite increased emphasis on stakeholder accountability, social validation is not frequently used in AAC research. This paper describes an investigation of the social validity of a vocabulary set identifi ed in earlier research. A previous study used stakeholder focus groups to identify vocabulary that could be used by South African adults who use AAC to disclose their experiences as victims of crime or abuse. Another study used this vocabulary to create communication boards for use by adults with complex communication needs. In this current project, 12 South African adults with complex communication needs who use AAC systems used a 5-point Likert scale to score the importance of each of the previously identifi ed 57 vocabulary items. This two-step process of fi rst using stakeholder focus groups to identify vocabulary, and then having literate persons who use AAC provide information on social validity of the vocabulary on behalf of their peers who are illiterate, appears to hold promise as a culturally relevant vocabulary selection approach for sensitive topics such as crime and abuse.http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/07434618.asphb201
Betsybha Evangeline, Anitha
Published: 4 November 2022
Abstract:
This paper aims to analyse how innovative Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems for non-standard speech recognition may revolutionize Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC) technology for people with severe speech impairments. The AI-based system is personalized for each person's unique speech production and offers a real step forward in improving the efficiency of AAC. With impressive enhancements in recognizing non-standard natural language supported by Machine Learning and Deep Learning algorithms, AI is offering a turning point for personalized and customized Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC). However, there is a need of understanding the contextual needs of the user which enhances the experience while using AAC. To address this, a systematic review has been done to identify existing applications and the technologies behind them. Also, challenges are explored that can lead to the future directions of the research work. This paper presents the results of the systematic review, after filtering 62 journal articles that are more relevant to the context from a pool of 1088 papers, in the perspective of the existing AI technologies in speech generation, speech reconstruction and speech generation. AI based AAC applications are comprehended in term of input/output, cost, infrastructure and user background. The paper also highlights the future research directions in this domain by identifying the research gaps.
, Maryam Fazeli
Published: 1 May 2017
Shiraz E-Medical Journal, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.5812/semj.44498

Abstract:
Quinolone Resistance Determinants qnr , qep , and aac(6’)-Ib-cr in Extended-Spectrum Β-Lactamase Producing Escherichia coli Isolated From Urinary Tract Infections in Tehran, Iran - Shiraz E-Medical Journal - - Kowsar
Chaitanya Narisetty, Emiru Tsunoo, XuanKai Chang, Yosuke Kashiwagi, Michael Hentschel, Shinji Watanabe
Abstract:
Speech samples recorded in both indoor and outdoor environments are often contaminated with secondary audio sources. Most end-to-end monaural speech recognition systems either remove these background sounds using speech enhancement or train noise-robust models. For better model interpretability and holistic understanding, we aim to bring together the growing field of automated audio captioning (AAC) and the thoroughly studied automatic speech recognition (ASR). The goal of AAC is to generate natural language descriptions of contents in audio samples. We propose several approaches for end-to-end joint modeling of ASR and AAC tasks and demonstrate their advantages over traditional approaches, which model these tasks independently. A major hurdle in evaluating our proposed approach is the lack of labeled audio datasets with both speech transcriptions and audio captions. Therefore we also create a multi-task dataset by mixing the clean speech Wall Street Journal corpus with multiple levels of background noises chosen from the AudioCaps dataset. We also perform extensive experimental evaluation and show improvements of our proposed methods as compared to existing state-of-the-art ASR and AAC methods.
Chaitanya Narisetty, Emiru Tsunoo, XuanKai Chang, Yosuke Kashiwagi, Michael Hentschel, Shinji Watanabe
Published: 3 February 2022
Abstract:
Speech samples recorded in both indoor and outdoor environments are often contaminated with secondary audio sources. Most end-to-end monaural speech recognition systems either remove these background sounds using speech enhancement or train noise-robust models. For better model interpretability and holistic understanding, we aim to bring together the growing field of automated audio captioning (AAC) and the thoroughly studied automatic speech recognition (ASR). The goal of AAC is to generate natural language descriptions of contents in audio samples. We propose several approaches for end-to-end joint modeling of ASR and AAC tasks and demonstrate their advantages over traditional approaches, which model these tasks independently. A major hurdle in evaluating our proposed approach is the lack of labeled audio datasets with both speech transcriptions and audio captions. Therefore we also create a multi-task dataset by mixing the clean speech Wall Street Journal corpus with multiple levels of background noises chosen from the AudioCaps dataset. We also perform extensive experimental evaluation and show improvements of our proposed methods as compared to existing state-of-the-art ASR and AAC methods.
Alexander J Rodríguez, Kevin Leow, , David Scott, Peter Ebeling, , Germaine Wong, Wai H Lim, John T Schousboe, Douglas P Kiel, et al.
Published: 2 April 2019
by BMJ
Journal: BMJ Open
Abstract:
Introduction Abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) is associated with low bone mass and increased fracture risk. Two previous meta-analyses have investigated the association between AAC and fracture. However, these meta-analyses only identified articles until December 2016, undertook limited searches and did not explore potential sources of between-study heterogeneity. We aim to undertake a sensitive and comprehensive assessment of the relationship between AAC, bone mineral density (BMD) as well as prevalent and incident fractures. Methods We will search MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science core collection and Google Scholar (top 200 articles sorted by relevance) from their inception to 1 June 2018. Reference lists of included studies and previous systematic reviews will be hand searched for additional eligible studies. Retrospective and prospective cohort studies (cross-sectional, case–control and longitudinal) reporting the association between AAC, BMD and fracture at any site will be included. At least two investigators will independently: (A) evaluate study eligibility and extract data, with a third investigator to adjudicate when discrepancies occur, (B) assess study quality by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for each cohort/study. The meta-analysis will be reported in adherence to the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology criteria. AAC will be grouped as either: (1) AAC present or absent, (2) AAC categorised as ‘low’ (referent—lowest reported group) versus ‘high’ (all other groups) or (3) dose–response when AAC was assessed in ≥3 groups. Where primary event data were reported in individual studies, pooled risk differences and risk ratios with 95% CI will be calculated, from which, a summary estimate will be determined using DerSimonian-Laird random effects models. For the AAC and BMD pooled analyses, estimates will be expressed as standardised mean difference with 95% CI. We will examine the likelihood of publication bias and where possible, investigate potential reasons for between-study heterogeneity using subgroup analyses and meta-regression. Ethics and dissemination The study will be submitted to a peer- reviewed journal and disseminated via research presentations. PROSPERO registration number CRD42018088019.
, , Shane Erickson
Published: 1 September 2016
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, pp 2349-2361; https://doi.org/10.2147/ndt.s95967

Abstract:
The role of augmentative and alternative communication for children with autism: current status and future trends Teresa Iacono,1 David Trembath,2 Shane Erickson3 1Living with Disability Research Centre, La Trobe University, Bendigo, VIC, Australia; 2Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 3Living with Disability Research Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Background: Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interventions are used for children with autism, often as stand-alone communication interventions for those who are minimally verbal. Our aim was to synthesize the evidence for AAC interventions for children (up to 21 years), and then consider the role of AAC within established, comprehensive, evidence-based autism interventions targeting learning across multiple developmental domains.Design: We completed a systematic search of three databases (OVID Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC) as well as forward citation and hand searches to identify systematic reviews of AAC intervention efficacy research including children with autism, published between 2000 and March 2016 in peer-reviewed journals. Data pertaining to the quality indicators of included studies, effect sizes for intervention outcomes, and evidence for effectiveness were extracted for descriptive analysis.Results: The search yielded 17 systematic reviews. Most provided indicators of research quality for included studies, of which only relatively few provided conclusive results. Communication targets tended to be focused on teaching children to make requests. Still, effect size measures for included studies indicated that AAC was effective to highly effective.Conclusion: There is growing evidence for the potential benefits of AAC for children with autism, but there is a need for more well-designed studies and broader, targeted outcomes. Furthermore, a lack of evidence for the role of AAC within comprehensive intervention programs may account for a tendency by autism researchers and practitioners to neglect this intervention. Attempts to compare evidence for AAC with other interventions for children with autism, including those in which the use of AAC is delayed or excluded in pursuit of speech-only communication, must take into account the needs of children with the most significant learning needs. These children pose the greatest challenges to achieving large and consistent intervention effects, yet stand to gain the most from AAC interventions. Keywords: autism, augmentative and alternative communication, intervention, research synthesis
, Pam Enderby, Philippa Evans,
Published: 31 May 2012
Folia Phoniatrica Et Logopaedica, Volume 64, pp 137-144; https://doi.org/10.1159/000338250

Abstract:
Background/Aims: In the last 20 years the range of high-technology augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) aids has rapidly expanded. This review aimed to provide a ‘state of the art’ synthesis, to provide evidence-based information for researchers, potential users and service providers. Methods: Electronic databases were searched from 2000 to 2010, together with reference lists of included papers and review papers. The review considered work of any design which reported an intervention using high-tech AAC with people who have communication difficulties (excluding those with solely hearing or visual loss) published in peer-reviewed journals. Results: Sixty-five papers reporting interventions using high-tech AAC were identified. There was evidence that high-technology AAC may be beneficial across a range of diagnoses and ages. The evidence, however, is currently drawn from studies using designs considered to be at high risk of bias. Conclusion: The review suggests that the high level of individual variation in outcome requires a greater understanding of characteristics of clients who may or may not benefit from this technology. Also, the wide range of outcomes measured requires further work in the field to establish what a ‘good outcome’ from intervention may be.
Sina Jasim
Published: 1 July 2022
Aace Clinical Case Reports, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aace.2022.06.003

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Eunike Cynthia Theresylle, Rehmadanta Sitepu, Chresiani Destianita Yoedistira
Published: 30 September 2022
Sainsbertek Jurnal Ilmiah Sains & Teknologi, Volume 3, pp 334-341; https://doi.org/10.33479/sb.v3i1.211

Abstract:
Resistance is the ability of bacteria to resist or stop antibiotics. However, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 23,000 people die per year from resistance. Resistance begins with exposure to antibiotics, initially there are only one or two bacteria that have a chance to live but can grow and spread. The spread through person to person, inappropriate use of antibiotics due to weak infection control. So the purpose of this study is to find out how the process of resistance by bacteria, as well as genes that play a role in antibiotic resistance of Aminoglycosides and Tetracyclines. Thus we can wisely use antibiotics,for the medical community, the community and help in efforts to reduce the level of resistance and the impact of other resistance. The research method used is the journal review method of 40 articles which is used as material to compare the results of several research articles. The articles used using Scholar and Pubmed searches were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. From the results of a journal review that Aminoglycoside and Tetracycline antibiotics have a high level of resistance. Aminoglycoside resistance is due to enzymatic inactivation by AAC,APH and ANT. The most common resistance is the Acetyltransferase (AAC) enzyme, namely the AAC(6')-I gene. Tetracycline resistance occurs by efflux pump mechanism, ribosome protection and enzymatic inactivation. The most common gene is tetM gene on ribosome protection mechanism which is expressed to mediate resistance to several antibiotics such as Doxycycline and Minocycline.
Published: 28 August 2018
Nusa: Jurnal Ilmu Bahasa Dan Sastra, Volume 13, pp 351-360; https://doi.org/10.14710/nusa.13.3.351-360

Abstract:
Research on the novel Ayat-Ayat Cinta (AAC) by Habiburrahman el Shirazy with ideological hegemony approach, the author's knowledge based on search on the internet, reference to the latest online journal (last 5 years), not found yet. Various related studies AAC most of them reviewed from the aspect of religiosity, da'wah and religious messages. This study aims to reveal ideological hegemony contained in the novel AAC. This literature study research, using the Gramsci hegemony approach. The research method used is descriptive analytic. The results showed Fahri's main character was constructed by the author with many positive attributes attached; handsome, smart, simple, obedient, and kind. These positive attributes and images make most female figures (Aisha, Maria, Nurul, Noura, Alicea) interested and admired Fahri, so Fahri also benefited and became a dominant class (hegemonic). Hegemony process these figures pan out, because one of them supported by religious ideology.
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