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Paolo Baldo, Sara Cecco, Diana Crestan, Sara Francescon, Elisa Giacomin, Liana Dalmas, Paola Molin, Fabio Puglisi
Published: 18 May 2020
Abstract:
On 11/3/2020, the World Health Organization declared that COVID-19 is a pandemic emergency. In this scenario, cancer patients are to be considered at higher risk, being fragile and often with disease-related or treatment-induced immunodepression. Furthermore, this health emergency generates a harmful psychological impact on these patients, who fear a lot about losing the continuity of cancer therapy. This fact must be carefully considered by health personnel, especially in countries where heavy risk containment and social distancing measures, the only epidemiological strategies currently considered adequate, are in force. In short, this is a very delicate challenge for health professionals engaged in oncology. Here, we report some insights and challenges that healthcare professionals face daily in caring for cancer patients.
Psychological Insights for Understanding COVID-19 and Media and Technology; doi:10.4324/9781003121756

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Psychological Insights for Understanding COVID-19 and Families, Parents, and Children; doi:10.4324/9781003136811

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Nicolien Van Der Poel, Anne-Laure Mansbach, Nathalie Loundon, John Russell, Olivier M. Vanderveken, An Boudewyns
Published: 16 June 2020
B-ENT, Volume 16, pp 59-62; doi:10.5152/b-ent.2020.20130

, S.K.S.T. Silva, T.P. Bandara, W.M.P.C. Weerasinghe, T.M.P.D.M. Thennakoon
Published: 26 January 2021
Abstract:
Background The COVID-19 pandemic outbreak is placing insurmountable challenges and burden on health systems and authorities demanding responses with effective and appropriate policies and interventions. Wrong decision making, lack of foresightedness and preparation in the acute and transition phases can threaten the gains collectively achieved. Understanding the behaviours, perceptions and feelings of the population is imperative in management decisions. Not much evidence is available on such behavioural insights to inform the COVID-19 response in countries. This study is expected to contribute to the evidence-informed understanding on effective management of the outbreak.Methods This was a cross sectional observational study with entirely voluntary online participation. The study protocol and the questionnaire, originally prepared by a WHO collaboration, were adjusted to match the local setting and resource availability. The study explored 14 variables including perceptions, trust and behaviours in relation to COVID-19. Data was collected during the first wave of COVID-19 in early May 2020 and statistically analysed to see the associations and comparisons between chosen variables.Results N = 1001 with 65.63% from the age range 18–29 years and 65% from the non -health care worker category. Basic or postgraduate degree holders were 64.7%. Participants were from 23 out of the 25 districts in SL with 34.07% from high-risk districts. They were in general, knowledgeable (e.g., > 95% correctly identified common symptoms of COVID19) and majority (99.5%) reported conforming to the health recommendations. They trusted government health bodies including hospitals (90.8%) but majority (63.8%) had poor confidence in media in the ability to manage the outbreak. Stigma around COVID-19 was not a concern for the majority of 78.9%. Participants less than 30 years believed in conspiracies around COVID-19 more than older counterparts.Conclusion The perceptions, affect and behaviour of the study population gives insights on information dissemination, gaps in health message delivery, alternative approaches in responding and policy making helping to improve the pandemic response.
Ahmad Arslan, Ismail Golgeci, Zaheer Khan, Omar Al-Tabbaa, Pia Hurmelinna-Laukkanen
Published: 14 December 2020
Multinational Business Review, Volume 29, pp 21-42; doi:10.1108/mbr-07-2020-0153

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 7 September 2020
Social Work Education, Volume 39, pp 1002-1009; doi:10.1080/02615479.2020.1819974

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Jasmine Harju-Seppanen, Rebecca Lane, Lewys Beams, , ,
Published: 6 November 2020
Abstract:
IntroductionWhile evidence has emerged concerning the impact of Covid-19 on the general population and the challenges facing health services, much less is known regarding how the pandemic has directly affected the delivery of mental health nursing care.AimThis paper aims to explore how Covid-19 has affected the ability of mental health nurses to deliver care in community and inpatient mental health services in the UK.MethodWe investigated staff reports regarding the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on mental healthcare and mental health service users in the UK, using a mixed methods online survey. A total of 897 nurses across a range of inpatient and community settings participated.DiscussionKey themes within the data explore: new ways of working; remote working; risks of infection/infection control challenges; and the impact on service users. Targeted guidelines are required to support mental health nurses providing care and support during a pandemic to people in severe mental distress, often in unsuitable environments.Implications for PracticeService developments need to occur alongside tailored guidance and support for staff welfare supported by clear leadership. These findings identify areas requiring attention and investment to prepare for future crises and the consequences of the pandemic.Accessible SummaryWhat is known on the subject?During the Covid-19 pandemic there has been research considering the impact on medical healthcare professionals and the mental health needs of the general population. However, limited focus has been placed on mental health services or mental health staff providing care in the community and in hospitals. Whilst nurses make up the largest section of the mental health workforce in the UK, the impact that this pandemic has had on their work has been largely ignored.What the paper adds to existing knowledge?This paper provides a unique insight into the experiences and impact that the Covid-19 pandemic has had on mental health nurses across a range of community and inpatient settings to understand what has changed in their work and the care they can and do provide during this crisis. This includes exploring how services have changed, the move to remote working, the impact of the protective equipment crisis on nurses, and the difficult working conditions facing those in inpatient settings where there is minimal guidance provided.What are the implications for practice?By understanding the impact the pandemic has had on mental health nursing care, we can understand the gaps in guidance that exist, the challenges being faced, and the impact the crisis has had on care for mental health service users. By doing so we can plan for the ongoing nature of this pandemic as well as the aftermath that the crisis may leave for our service users and workforce alike.Relevance StatementThis paper provides insight into the impact that the Covid-19 pandemic has had on the service and care that mental health nurses are expected to and can provide. As a workforce that often requires ongoing face to face contact with service users, many in serious distress, in inpatient and community settings, it is important that we understand their experiences and the challenges and risks that face this workforce. This will enable us to ensure that future planning, guidance, support and safeguarding can take place during the ongoing and future crises.
Sheree Lloyd, , Ani Goswami
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management, Volume 15, pp 23-28; doi:10.24083/apjhm.v15i3.473

Abstract:
Global health systems are under immense pressure with the exponential growth and spread of COVID-19. Public health and health system responses to the pandemic have relied on health information reporting, visualisation, and projections of incidence, morbidity, and mortality. This commentary aims to explore how health information has been used to inform the public, manage risk, understand capacity, prepare the health system and to plan public health strategy. We also aim to share the health information challenges and our insights to inform future debate and strategic investment. This paper will be relevant to health service and health information managers wanting to understand vulnerabilities and focus for future health information initiatives.
, , Mia Bloom, , Sarah Zukerman Daly, Chappell Lawson, Zoe Marks, , Kacie Miura, Richard Nielsen, et al.
PS: Political Science & Politics pp 1-6; doi:10.1017/s1049096520001754

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Yuliana Yuliana
(JKG) JURNAL KEPERAWATAN GLOBAL, Volume 5, pp 100-109; doi:10.37341/jkg.v5i2.156

Abstract:
Background: COVID-19 pandemic condition made the consultation shifted from face to face consultation to telemedicine for mild, stable, and follow up cases. In stabile condition of pregnant patients, telemedicine implementation will be beneficial to reduce the COVID-19 transmission risk. The problems are not all patients can implement telemedicine and the reimbursement procedure was hard. The aim of this paper is to describe about challenges in telemedicine implementation for pregnancy care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: this paper is a literature review, Literature was identified from the archives of PubMed, Scopus, and Elsevier. All the literature was published in 2020. The inclusion criteria were the literature should be peer-reviewed and related to the topic of the paper. Keywords were challenges, COVID-19, opportunities, pregnancy, and telemedicine. Results: from 18 articles in this literature review, it was found that challenges in telemedicine are reimbursement, infrastructure, confidentiality, and unfamiliarity for the pregnant patients. Conclusion: Telemedicine can be used for pregnant patient control consultation during the stable condition to minimize the risk of COVID-19 transmission. The implication of this paper is to give insight that telemedicine can be done for stable pregnancy condition to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission during the pandemic. The benefits of reducing COVID-19 risk transmission for baby and mother outweigh the challenges and problems such as reimbursement, confidentiality, and technical issues.
, Pablo-David Rojas, Joscha Hofferbert, Alvaro Valera Sosa, Anastasiya Lebedev, , , , ,
Journal of Medical Internet Research, Volume 23; doi:10.2196/25283

Abstract:
Background The COVID-19 outbreak has affected the lives of millions of people by causing a dramatic impact on many health care systems and the global economy. This devastating pandemic has brought together communities across the globe to work on this issue in an unprecedented manner. Objective This case study describes the steps and methods employed in the conduction of a remote online health hackathon centered on challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. It aims to deliver a clear implementation road map for other organizations to follow. Methods This 4-day hackathon was conducted in April 2020, based on six COVID-19–related challenges defined by frontline clinicians and researchers from various disciplines. An online survey was structured to assess: (1) individual experience satisfaction, (2) level of interprofessional skills exchange, (3) maturity of the projects realized, and (4) overall quality of the event. At the end of the event, participants were invited to take part in an online survey with 17 (+5 optional) items, including multiple-choice and open-ended questions that assessed their experience regarding the remote nature of the event and their individual project, interprofessional skills exchange, and their confidence in working on a digital health project before and after the hackathon. Mentors, who guided the participants through the event, also provided feedback to the organizers through an online survey. Results A total of 48 participants and 52 mentors based in 8 different countries participated and developed 14 projects. A total of 75 mentorship video sessions were held. Participants reported increased confidence in starting a digital health venture or a research project after successfully participating in the hackathon, and stated that they were likely to continue working on their projects. Of the participants who provided feedback, 60% (n=18) would not have started their project without this particular hackathon and indicated that the hackathon encouraged and enabled them to progress faster, for example, by building interdisciplinary teams, gaining new insights and feedback provided by their mentors, and creating a functional prototype. Conclusions This study provides insights into how online hackathons can contribute to solving the challenges and effects of a pandemic in several regions of the world. The online format fosters team diversity, increases cross-regional collaboration, and can be executed much faster and at lower costs compared to in-person events. Results on preparation, organization, and evaluation of this online hackathon are useful for other institutions and initiatives that are willing to introduce similar event formats in the fight against COVID-19.
Darshan Gandhi, Rohan Sukumaran, Priyanshi Katiyar, Alex Radunsky, Sunaina Anand, Shailesh Advani, Jil Kothari, Kasia Jakimowicz, Sheshank Shankar, Sethuraman T. V., et al.
Published: 3 December 2020
by ArXiv
Abstract:
The COVID-19 Pandemic has left a devastating trail all over the world, in terms of loss of lives, economic decline, travel restrictions, trade deficit, and collapsing economy including real-estate, job loss, loss of health benefits, the decline in quality of access to care and services and overall quality of life. Immunization from the anticipated vaccines will not be the stand-alone guideline that will help surpass the pandemic and return to normalcy. Four pillars of effective public health intervention include diagnostic testing for both asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals, contact tracing, quarantine of individuals with symptoms or who are exposed to COVID-19, and maintaining strict hygiene standards at the individual and community level. Digital technology, currently being used for COVID-19 testing include certain mobile apps, web dashboards, and online self-assessment tools. Herein, we look into various digital solutions adapted by communities across universities, businesses, and other organizations. We summarize the challenges experienced using these tools in terms of quality of information, privacy, and user-centric issues. Despite numerous digital solutions available and being developed, many vary in terms of information being shared in terms of both quality and quantity, which can be overwhelming to the users. Understanding the testing landscape through a digital lens will give a clear insight into the multiple challenges that we face including data privacy, cost, and miscommunication. It is the destiny of digitalization to navigate testing for COVID-19. Block-chain based systems can be used for privacy preservation and ensuring ownership of the data to remain with the user. Another solution involves having digital health passports with relevant and correct information. In this early draft, we summarize the challenges and propose possible solutions to address the same.
Michael James Fell, Laura Pagel, Chien-Fei Chen, Matthew H. Goldberg, Mario Herberz, Gesche Huebner, Siddharth Sareen, Ulf J.J. Hahnel
Published: 6 May 2020
Abstract:
Measures to control the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are having unprecedented impacts on people’s lives around the world. In this paper, we argue that those conducting social research in the energy domain should give special consideration to the internal and external validity of their work conducted during this pandemic period. We set out a number of principles that researchers can consider to give themselves and research users greater confidence that findings and recommendations will still be applicable in years to come. Largely grounded in existing good practice guidance, our recommendations include collecting and reporting additional supporting contextual data, reviewing aspects of research design for vulnerability to validity challenges, and building in longitudinal elements where feasible. We suggest that these approaches also bring a number of opportunities to generate new insights. However, we caution that a more systemic challenge to validity of knowledge produced during this period may result from changes in the kinds of social research that it is practicable to pursue.
, Dean McDonnell, Bin Liang, Jennifer Kue, Xiaoshan Li, Sabina Šegalo, Shailesh Advani, Bertha E Flores, Jing Wang
Published: 19 January 2021
Abstract:
Background: Cancer patients are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19, partially owing to their compromised immune systems and curbed or cut cancer healthcare services caused by the pandemic. As a result, cancer caregivers may have to shoulder triple crises: the COVID-19 pandemic, pronounced healthcare needs from the patient, and elevated need for care from within. While technology-based health interventions have the potential to address unique challenges cancer caregivers face amid COVID-19, limited insights are available. Thus, to bridge this gap, we aim to identify technology-based interventions designed for cancer caregivers and report the characteristics and effects of these interventions concerning cancer caregivers' distinctive challenges amid COVID-19. Methods: A systematic search of the literature will be conducted in PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Scopus from the database inception to the end of March, 2021. Articles that center on technology-based interventions for cancer caregivers will be included in the review. The search strategy will be developed in consultation with an academic librarian who is experienced in systematic review studies. Titles, abstracts, and full-text articles will be screened against eligibility criteria developed a priori. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses procedures will be followed for the reporting process. Conclusions: COVID-19 has upended cancer care as we know it. Findings of this study can shed light on evidence-based and practical solutions cancer caregivers can utilize to mitigate the unique challenges they face amid COVID-19. Furthermore, results of this study will also offer valuable insights for researchers who aim to develop interventions for cancer caregivers in the context of COVID-19. In addition, we also expect to be able to identify areas for improvement that need to be addressed in order for health experts to more adequately help cancer caregivers weather the storm of global health crises like COVID-19 and beyond. Study Protocol Registration: PROSPERO CRD42020196301
Diego Pacheco
Published: 1 January 2020
SSRN Electronic Journal; doi:10.2139/ssrn.3564390

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Kushal Mansatta, Garry Mallett, Victoria Harris, Katherine R W Emary, Andrew J Pollard
Published: 1 February 2021
The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 21; doi:10.1016/s1473-3099(20)30773-8

Abstract:
Summary The novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused more than 1 million deaths in the first 6 months of the pandemic and huge economic and social upheaval internationally. An efficacious vaccine is essential to prevent further morbidity and mortality. Although some countries might deploy COVID-19 vaccines on the strength of safety and immunogenicity data alone, the goal of vaccine development is to gain direct evidence of vaccine efficacy in protecting humans against SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 so that manufacture of efficacious vaccines can be selectively upscaled. A candidate vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 might act against infection, disease, or transmission, and a vaccine capable of reducing any of these elements could contribute to disease control. However, the most important efficacy endpoint, protection against severe disease and death, is difficult to assess in phase 3 clinical trials. In this Review, we explore the challenges in assessing the efficacy of candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, discuss the caveats needed to interpret reported efficacy endpoints, and provide insight into answering the seemingly simple question, "Does this COVID-19 vaccine work?"
, Li Liu, , Yue Yang, ,
Published: 29 March 2020
Abstract:
BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been an unprecedented challenge to the global health care system. Tools that can improve the focus of surveillance efforts and clinical decision support are of paramount importance. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to illustrate how new medical informatics technologies may enable effective control of the pandemic through the development and successful 72-hour deployment of the Honghu Hybrid System (HHS) for COVID-19 in the city of Honghu in Hubei, China. METHODS The HHS was designed for the collection, integration, standardization, and analysis of COVID-19-related data from multiple sources, which includes a case reporting system, diagnostic labs, electronic medical records, and social media on mobile devices. RESULTS HHS supports four main features: syndromic surveillance on mobile devices, policy-making decision support, clinical decision support and prioritization of resources, and follow-up of discharged patients. The syndromic surveillance component in HHS covered over 95% of the population of over 900,000 people and provided near real time evidence for the control of epidemic emergencies. The clinical decision support component in HHS was also provided to improve patient care and prioritize the limited medical resources. However, the statistical methods still require further evaluations to confirm clinical effectiveness and appropriateness of disposition assigned in this study, which warrants further investigation. CONCLUSIONS The facilitating factors and challenges are discussed to provide useful insights to other cities to build suitable solutions based on cloud technologies. The HHS for COVID-19 was shown to be feasible and effective in this real-world field study, and has the potential to be migrated.
Michael T. Meehan, Diana P. Rojas, Adeshina I. Adekunle, , Jamie M. Caldwell, Evelyn Turek, Bridget M. Williams, Ben J. Marais, James M. Trauer,
Published: 1 September 2020
Paediatric Respiratory Reviews, Volume 35, pp 64-69; doi:10.1016/j.prrv.2020.06.014

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Abu Naser Mohammad Saif, Mahfuzur Rahman, Asadul Islam, Paul Agu Igwe
International Journal of Quality and Innovation, Volume 1; doi:10.1504/ijqi.2021.10035030

Dana L. Crosby, Arun Sharma
Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Volume 163, pp 38-41; doi:10.1177/0194599820922502

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, R.C. Siriwardana, M.T.P.R. Perera, G. Narasimhan, S.C. Chan, A.S. Dassanayake
Published: 1 November 2020
Transplantation Proceedings, Volume 52, pp 2601-2606; doi:10.1016/j.transproceed.2020.05.032

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 November 2020
Cancer Cell, Volume 38, pp 629-646; doi:10.1016/j.ccell.2020.09.018

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Michael D. Cantor
NEJM Catalyst, Volume 1; doi:10.1056/cat.20.0351

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Comment
Anastasia Z. Kalea, Dorothy Klimis-Zacas
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care, Volume 23, pp 233-235; doi:10.1097/mco.0000000000000667

Emmanuel Mogaji
Published: 30 March 2020
SSRN Electronic Journal; doi:10.2139/ssrn.3564702

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Elisa Franco, George Mohler, Martin B. Short, Daniel Sledge
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume 117, pp 16732-16738; doi:10.1073/pnas.2006520117

Abstract:
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has placed epidemic modeling at the forefront of worldwide public policy making. Nonetheless, modeling and forecasting the spread of COVID-19 remains a challenge. Here, we detail three regional-scale models for forecasting and assessing the course of the pandemic. This work demonstrates the utility of parsimonious models for early-time data and provides an accessible framework for generating policy-relevant insights into its course. We show how these models can be connected to each other and to time series data for a particular region. Capable of measuring and forecasting the impacts of social distancing, these models highlight the dangers of relaxing nonpharmaceutical public health interventions in the absence of a vaccine or antiviral therapies.
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, Volume 16, pp 1-4; doi:10.1186/s13023-021-01734-3

Abstract:
This article describes my reflections of speaking with three patients and their families living with mastocytosis, who I was introduced to through the UK Mastocytosis Support Group. I discuss the various ways in which the condition affects their day-to-day lives and how this has changed during the Covid-19 pandemic. I have tried to give an insight into the particular difficulties that this patient group faces, both during and before the pandemic, whilst also considering how these challenges may resonate more widely with other patient groups in the rare disease community. Pseudonyms are used throughout to protect patient anonymity.
, Michael J. Neep, Tom Steffens, Adam Westerink
Published: 22 August 2020
by Wiley
Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, Volume 67, pp 345-351; doi:10.1002/jmrs.423

Abstract:
The purpose of this commentary was to outline several key considerations and challenges for medical imaging departments during a global pandemic. Five public hospital medical imaging departments were identified in South‐East Queensland, Australia, to provide insight into their response to the COVID‐19 pandemic. Common themes were identified, with the four considered most pertinent documented in this commentary. Similar operational considerations and challenges were identified amongst all sites. This commentary intends to serve as a starting point for medical imaging departments in considering the planning and implementation of services in a pandemic scenario.
Journal of International Business Studies, Volume 51, pp 697-713; doi:10.1057/s41267-020-00335-9

Abstract:
We show the relevance of extant international business (IB) research, and more specifically work on international human resources management (IHRM), to address COVID-19 pandemic challenges. Decision-makers in multinational enterprises have undertaken various types of actions to alleviate the impacts of the pandemic. In most cases these actions relate in some way to managing distance and to rethinking boundaries, whether at the macro- or firm-levels. Managing distance and rethinking boundaries have been the primary focus of much IB research since the IB field was established as a legitimate area of academic inquiry. The pandemic has led to increased cross-border distance problems (e.g., as the result of travel bans and reduced international mobility), and often also to new intra-firm distancing challenges imposed upon previously co-located employees. Prior IHRM research has highlighted the difficulties presented by distance, in terms of employee selection, training, support, health and safety, as well as leadership and virtual collaboration. Much of this thinking is applicable to solve pandemic-related distance challenges. The present, extreme cases of requisite physical distancing need not imply equivalent increases in psychological distance, and also offer firms some insight into the unanticipated benefits of a virtual workforce – a type of workforce that, quite possibly, will influence the ‘new normal’ of the post-COVID world. Extant IHRM research does offer actionable insight for today, but outstanding knowledge gaps remain. Looking ahead, we offer three domains for future IHRM research: managing under uncertainty, facilitating international and even global work, and redefining organizational performance.
Published: 12 October 2020
by IEEE
IEEE Access, Volume 8, pp 186821-186839; doi:10.1109/access.2020.3030090

Abstract:
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19), declared by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a global pandemic, has brought with it changes to the general way of life. Major sectors of the world industry and economy have been affected and the Internet of Things (IoT) management and framework is no exception in this regard. This article provides an up to date survey on how a global pandemic such as COVID-19 has affected the world of IoT technologies. It looks at the contributions that IoT and associated sensor technologies have made towards virus tracing, tracking and spread mitigation. The associated challenges of deployment of sensor hardware in the face of a rapidly spreading pandemic have been looked into as part of this review article. The effects of a global pandemic on the evolution of IoT architectures and management have also been addressed, leading to the likely outcomes on future IoT implementations. In general, this article provides an insight into the advancement of sensor-based E-health towards the management of global pandemics. It also answers the question of how a global virus pandemic has shaped the future of IoT networks.
, Nancy Davis Lewis
Eurasian Geography and Economics pp 1-19; doi:10.1080/15387216.2020.1786425

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 17; doi:10.3390/ijerph17103666

Abstract:
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak is rapidly progressing globally, and Italy, as one of the main pandemic hotspots, may provide some hard lessons for other countries. In this paper, we summarize the current organizational capacity and provide a pragmatic and narrative account of strategies and activities implemented by the Department of Prevention (Dipartimento di Prevenzione)—the regional entity of the Local Health Authority of the Italian National Health Service in charge of public health—since the beginning of the outbreak. We conduct a preliminary analysis of general strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) of the response strategies from a local perspective. Furthermore, we provide firsthand insights on future directions and priorities to manage this unprecedented pandemic. Our case report gives a qualitative view of the healthcare response, based on the experience of frontline professionals, with the aim to generate hypotheses about factors which may promote or hinder the prevention and management of a pandemic locally. We highlight the importance of a public health approach for responding to COVID-19 and reshaping healthcare systems.
Derek John Ireland
Published: 5 August 2020
SSRN Electronic Journal; doi:10.2139/ssrn.3667699

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
International Journal of Community Well-Being, Volume 3, pp 417-424; doi:10.1007/s42413-020-00068-5

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 10 February 2021
Public Money & Management pp 1-3; doi:10.1080/09540962.2021.1880059

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 17; doi:10.3390/ijerph17207397

Abstract:
Disparities in dietary behaviors have been directly linked to the food environment, including access to retail food outlets. The Coronavirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to major changes in the distribution, sale, purchase, preparation, and consumption of food in the United States (US). This paper reflects on those changes and provides recommendations for research to understand the impact of the pandemic on the retail food environment (RFE) and consumer behavior. Using the Retail Food Environment and Customer Interaction Model, we describe the impact of COVID-19 in four key areas: (1) community, state, tribal, and federal policy; (2) retail actors, business models, and sources; (3) customer experiences; and (4) dietary intake. We discuss how previously existing vulnerabilities and inequalities based on race, ethnicity, class, and geographic location were worsened by the pandemic. We recommend approaches for building a more just and equitable RFE, including understanding the impacts of changing shopping behaviors and adaptations to federal nutrition assistance as well as how small food business can be made more sustainable. By better understanding the RFE adaptations that have characterized the COVID-19 pandemic, we hope to gain greater insight into how our food system can become more resilient in the future.
Rajesh R. Pai, Sreejith Alathur
International Journal of Health Governance, Volume 26, pp 42-50; doi:10.1108/ijhg-04-2020-0043

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Hannah C. Giunta, Bart L. Clarke, Yves Ouellette, Tamyra L. Armbrust, , R. Scott Wright
Published: 1 January 2021
Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Volume 96, pp 165-173; doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2020.10.021

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 18 June 2020
ACS Nano, Volume 14, pp 7783-7807; doi:10.1021/acsnano.0c04421

Abstract:
Biosensors and nanoscale analytical tools have shown huge growth in literature in the past 20 years, with a large number of reports on the topic of ‘ultrasensitive’, ‘cost-effective’, and ‘early detection’ tools with a potential of ‘mass-production’ cited on the web of science. Yet none of these tools are commercially available in the market or practically viable for mass production and use in pandemic diseases such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this context, we review the technological challenges and opportunities of current bio/chemical sensors and analytical tools by critically analyzing the bottlenecks which have hindered the implementation of advanced sensing technologies in pandemic diseases. We also describe in brief COVID-19 by comparing it with other pandemic strains such as that of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) for the identification of features that enable biosensing. Moreover, we discuss visualization and characterization tools that can potentially be used not only for sensing applications but also to assist in speeding up the drug discovery and vaccine development process. Furthermore, we discuss the emerging monitoring mechanism, namely wastewater-based epidemiology, for early warning of the outbreak, focusing on sensors for rapid and on-site analysis of SARS-CoV2 in sewage. To conclude, we provide holistic insights into challenges associated with the quick translation of sensing technologies, policies, ethical issues, technology adoption, and an overall outlook of the role of the sensing technologies in pandemics.
Vassilios Zoumpourlis, Maria Goulielmaki, , Demetrios A. Spandidos
Molecular Medicine Reports, Volume 22, pp 3035-3048; doi:10.3892/mmr.2020.11393

Abstract:
The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, has spread around the globe with unprecedented consequences for the health of millions of people. While the pandemic is still in progress, with new incidents being reported every day, the resilience of the global society is constantly being challenged. Under these circumstances, the future seems uncertain. SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has spread panic among civilians and insecurity at all socio-political and economic levels, dramatically disrupting everyday life, global economy, international travel and trade. The disease has also been linked to the onset of depression in many individuals due to the extreme restriction measures that have been taken for the prevention of the rapid spreading of COVID-19. First, the socio-economic, political and psychological implications of the COVID-19 pandemic were explored. Substantial evidence is provided for the consequences of the pandemic on all aspects of everyday life, while at the same time we unravel the role and the pursuits of national regimes during this unforeseen situation. The second goal of this review is related to the scientific aspect of the pandemic. Hence, we explain why SARS-CoV-2 is not a so-called ‘invisible enemy’, and also attempt to give insight regarding the origin of the virus, in an effort to reject the conspiracy theories that have arisen during the pandemic. Finally, rational strategies were investigated for successful vaccine development. We are optimistic that this review will complement the knowledge of specialized scientists and inform non-specialized readers on basic scientific questions, and also on the social and economic implications of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Ichiro Matsuoka
Pharmacy Education pp 91-94; doi:10.46542/pe.2020.202.9194

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Patrick Barth
Telemedicine in Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine pp 139-146; doi:10.1007/978-3-030-53879-8_13

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Yves Vandekerckhove, , Kelly De Jaegher, Marleen De Mul
Journal of Medical Internet Research, Volume 22; doi:10.2196/19771

Abstract:
During the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, cardiologists have attempted to minimize risks to their patients by using telehealth to provide continuing care. Rapid implementation of video consultations in outpatient clinics for patients with heart disease can be challenging. We employed a design thinking tool called a customer journey to explore challenges and opportunities when using video communication software in the cardiology department of a regional hospital. Interviews were conducted with 5 patients with implanted devices, a nurse, an information technology manager and two cardiologists. Three lessons were identified based on these challenges and opportunities. Attention should be given to the ease of use of the technology, the meeting features, and the establishment of the connection between the cardiologist and the patient. Further, facilitating the role of an assistant (or virtual assistant) with the video consultation software who can manage the telehealth process may improve the success of video consultations. Employing design thinking to implement video consultations in cardiology and to further implement telehealth is crucial to build a resilient health care system that can address urgent needs beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 17; doi:10.3390/ijerph17124279

Abstract:
(1) Introduction. A recent viral outbreak of novel coronavirus (CoVID-19) was declared as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) due to its global public health concern. There has been an aggressive growth in the number of emerging cases suggesting rapid spread of the virus. Since the first reported case of CoVID-19, there has been vast progress in understanding the dynamics of CoVID-19. However, there is an increasing evidence of epidemiological disparity in disease burden between urban and rural areas, with rural areas having minimal pandemic preparedness and their own healthcare challenges. Therefore, this review aims to provide insight on the pathogenesis and the transmission dynamics of CoVID-19 along with pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention strategies to mitigate the clinical manifestation of this virus. This review also aims to assess existing challenges of the CoVID-19 pandemic in rural areas based on past pandemic experiences and the effect on rural population. (2) Methods. A literature review was conducted using databases such as PubMed, Science Direct, Academic Search Premier, ProQuest, and Google Scholar, along with information from governmental organizations such as Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO). (3) Results. The causative virus, with its likely zoonotic origin, has demonstrated high pathogenicity in humans through increasing human-to-human transmission leading to extensive mitigation strategies, including patient quarantine and mass “social distancing” measures. Although the clinical manifestation of symptoms is mild in majority of the virus-inflicted population, critical patients may present with pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome, exacerbated by pre-existing comorbidities, eventually leading to death. While effective coronavirus disease (CoVID-19)-specific vaccines and drugs are under clinical trials, several pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been adapted to manage symptoms and curtail the effect of the virus to prevent increasing morbidity and mortality. Several persisting challenges have been noted for mitigating CoVID-19 in rural areas, including the poor healthcare infrastructure, health literacy, pandemic preparedness along with the fact that majority of rural population are frail subjects with pre-existing comorbidities. (4) Discussion. The increasing rate of incidence of CoVID-19 presents its own challenges, burdening healthcare institutions and the global economy, and impacting the physical and mental health of people worldwide. Given the clinical insights into CoVID-19 and the challenges presented in this review for the U.S. rural population, mitigation strategies should be designed accordingly to minimize the morbidity and mortality of this contagion.
, Mika Ruchama Moran, , Cecilia Anza-Ramirez,
Published: 1 January 2020
Cadernos de Saúde Pública, Volume 36; doi:10.1590/0102-311x00185820

Abstract:
Parks and “green spaces” offer psychological restoration and ease mental health challenges (stress, anxiety, and depression), which are currently rising due to the pandemic and quarantine policies 1. Parks also provide opportunities for physical activity practices in social distancing, which can increase resilience to the COVID-19 by preventing and controlling chronic conditions such as obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases 2,3. However, parks can also provide hubs for community transmissions.
, Pranjal J. Goswami, , Satya Prakash
Published: 1 February 2021
Heliyon; doi:10.1016/j.heliyon.2021.e06313

Abstract:
The outbreak of COVID-19 has engendered a global health crisis along with diverse impacts on economy, society and environment.Effortsto combat this pandemic have also significantly shot-up the quantity of Bio-medical Waste (BMW) generation.Safe disposal of large quantity of BMW has been graduallyposinga major challenge.BMW management is mostly implemented at municipal level following regulatory guidelines defined by respective states and the Union. This article is a narrative of the status of BMW generation, management and regulation in India in the context of COVID-19 crisis. The article is based on comparative analysis of data on BMW generation and management from authentic sources, a systematic literature review and review of news reports. In the current pandemic situation where media has been playing a significant role in highlighting all the concerns related to COVID-19 spread and management. Assessing the ground situation regarding effectiveness of prevailing BMW management facilities, requirement and suggestions can provide insights to the subject with policy implications for India and countries as well.The discussion has been built on different dimensions of BMW management during the pandemic including existing infrastructures, capacity utilisation, policy guidelines, operational practices and waste-handlers aspects. The results on state-wise analysis of reported BMW quantity and active COVID-19 patients also reveal some non-linear relationship between the two variables. Delhi, the National Capital is situated at a better position in terms of BMW management as compared to other studied states. The findings are expected to provide valuable insights to the policy makers and other relevant authorities to evaluate adequateness as well as efficiency quotients of entire BMW management landscape. Some of the critical observations of this article are also expected to offer impetus for enhancing national disaster preparedness infuture.
Mohd Abdul Ahad, Mohd Abdul Ahad, Sara Paiva, Sara Paiva, Gautami Tripathi, Gautami Tripathi, Zeeshan Ali Haq, Zeeshan Ali Haq, Tabrez Nafis, Tabrez Nafis, et al.
Studies in Systems, Decision and Control pp 79-106; doi:10.1007/978-3-030-60039-6_4

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, Yves Vandekerckhove, , Kelly De Jaegher, Marleen De Mul
Published: 30 April 2020
Abstract:
UNSTRUCTURED During the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, cardiologists have attempted to minimize risks to their patients by using telehealth to provide continuing care. Rapid implementation of video consultations in outpatient clinics for patients with heart disease can be challenging. We employed a design thinking tool called a customer journey to explore challenges and opportunities when using video communication software in the cardiology department of a regional hospital. Interviews were conducted with 5 patients with implanted devices, a nurse, an information technology manager and two cardiologists. Three lessons were identified based on these challenges and opportunities. Attention should be given to the ease of use of the technology, the meeting features, and the establishment of the connection between the cardiologist and the patient. Further, facilitating the role of an assistant (or virtual assistant) with the video consultation software who can manage the telehealth process may improve the success of video consultations. Employing design thinking to implement video consultations in cardiology and to further implement telehealth is crucial to build a resilient health care system that can address urgent needs beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.
Iza Gigauri
Published: 21 November 2020
Archives of Business Research, Volume 8, pp 1-18; doi:10.14738/abr.811.9313

Abstract:
Purpose - The paper aims to clarify the implications of COVID-19 on organizations and Human Resource Management. The study proposes organizational responses to the pandemic, and outlines how to adapt HRM practices to the new normal. It aims to explore how human resource managers support employees and whether top management has a strategic focus on employee wellbeing during the crisis. Design/methodology/approach - The paper opted for quantitative research method using descriptive research design. The data was collected with the survey. Questionnaires were distributed to the HR managers through the Internet. The response rate is 32%. The gathered data was analyzed through SPSS. Findings - The research provides empirical insights on the challenges organizations are facing due to the pandemic. It sheds light on the decisions Georgian managers took in times of Covid-19. The paper suggests that changes in HR policies will lead to successfully overcome emerged difficulties with remote working, flexible schedule, and employee wellbeing. Research limitations/implications - The research results may lack generalizability due to the small amount of participants in the survey. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to conduct future larger-scale research. Practical implications - The paper includes implications for the development of HRM strategy to adapt to the new reality shaped by the pandemic, and for managing remote working systems considering the employee perspectives. Social implications - The paper contributes to decisions of policymakers and governments regarding the workforce, and to the society for responding the changes. Originality/value - This paper studied the role of HR managers in employee adaptation to the pandemic state, their perceptions towards organizational response to the crisis, and supportive behavior.
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