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(searched for: (title:(Complications in Maxillary Local Anesthesia)
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Chisci Glauco
Global Journal of Anesthesiology, Volume 2, pp 036-036; doi:10.17352/2455-3476.000014

Abstract:
Global Journal of Anesthesiology is a peer reviewed, an open access, international, academic and elevated scope journal...
F Koumoura, G Papageorgiou
Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany : 1985), Volume 32

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Fritz-Ulrich Meyer
Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger, Volume 181, pp 105-106; doi:10.1016/s0940-9602(99)80110-1

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Sung Ho Yoon, Seunggon Jung, Taegu Kang, Hyung Chae Yang
Journal of Oral Implantology, Volume 45, pp 219-222; doi:10.1563/aaid-joi-d-18-00231

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, B. Keskin, S.C. Isler, E. Cansiz, A. Uzun, C. Keskin
Journal of Stomatology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Volume 118, pp 279-282; doi:10.1016/j.jormas.2017.06.008

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, Zydnia Echeverria,
Published: 1 October 2010
Dental Clinics of North America, Volume 54, pp 677-686; doi:10.1016/j.cden.2010.06.008

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Serge A. Steenen, , Peerooz Saeed, Jan de Lange
Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, Volume 113; doi:10.1016/j.tripleo.2011.07.032

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R. Brad Tanner, John A. E. Hubbell
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, Volume 36, pp 40-45; doi:10.1177/0898756419848165

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Journal of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Volume 14, pp 862-865; doi:10.1007/s12663-015-0756-7

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Seref Ezirganli, Hakki Oguz Kazancioglu
Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Volume 24, pp 2178-2179; doi:10.1097/scs.0b013e3182a2de1a

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, Pierre Bouletreau, , Badr Ibrahim, , Nicolas Sigaux
Scientific Reports, Volume 10, pp 1-9; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68968-2

Abstract:
Surgical site infections (SSI) occur in 1.4% to 33.4% of cases after orthognathic surgery. This type of complication is a major concern to surgical teams, but there is no consensus for the prevention and treatment of SSI in orthognathic surgery. The purpose of this descriptive study was to evaluate the severity and the consequences of postoperative infections. The charts of all the patients operated on by the orthognathic surgery team between January 2015 and July 2017 were collected. All types of orthognathic procedures (Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split mandibular osteotomy, and genioplasty) were screened, and patients diagnosed with SSI were included. Demographic data, timing and severity of the infection, as well as long-term complications were recorded. Five hundred and twelve patients were screened. Forty-one patients (8%) presenting with SSI were included. There were 18 men and 23 women. The site of the infection was mandibular for 38 patients (92.7%) and maxillary for 3 patients (7.3%). The average time between surgery and infection was 31.5 days. Twenty-four patients received isolated oral antibiotics for inflammatory cellulitic reaction (58.8%), 15 patients had a localized collection treated by incision and drainage under local anesthesia (36.6%), and 2 patients had an extensive collection requiring surgical drainage under general anesthesia (4.9%). Five patients (12.2%) needed hardware removal for plate loosening, and 2 patients (4.9%) developed chronic osteomyelitis. Infection following orthognathic surgery is easily treated most of the time with no long-term complications. In cases of patients with potential risk factors for severe infection, antibiotics may be given with curative intents.
, Nama Bhavana
Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Volume 23, pp 580-583; doi:10.4103/jisp.jisp_603_18

Abstract:
We report a case of palatal pyogenic granuloma following mucogingival surgery for alveolar socket preservation. A 24-year-old systemically healthy female underwent a pediculated palatal pedicle graft procedure to achieve soft tissue augmentation over a grafted maxillary anterior extraction site. After 1 month, a 15 mm × 20 mm exophytic growth extending from the palatal donor site to distance of 3-4 mm from the extraction socket was observed. After obtaining the subject's consent, local anesthesia was administered and the growth was excised from the base. On histopathological examination, the findings suggestive of pyogenic granuloma were seen. Palatal pyogenic granuloma occurs rarely and the authors were unable to find the reports of pyogenic granuloma originating in the vicinity of a surgical wound after a pediculated connective tissue mucogingival procedure. Healing plays a vital role in mucogingival procedures, and thus, it is very important to know about the complications affecting this important cascade of events. Failing to consider potential sources of irritation or trauma at the surgical site may lead to considerable morbidity even in sites that may heal without any untoward complications.
Ujwala Rohan Newadkar, Lalit Chaudhari, Yogita Khalekar
Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Volume 5, pp 785-788; doi:10.4103/2249-4863.201147

Abstract:
The upper jaw forms the floor of the maxillary sinus and the upper teeth are continuous with the whole midface and cranium, therefore while treating these teeth, it is important for the practitioner to consider the possibility of ocular complications. Ocular disturbances such as blurring of vision, mydriasis, ptosis, diplopia, enophthalmos, miosis, and blindness are rare complications due to intraoral local anesthesia. So far at present, the general population is having myths and misconceptions regarding the extraction of teeth and vision loss; hence, we evaluated the same. A cross-sectional prospective survey targeting the general public was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 300 standardized self-administered questionnaires were given and the data were analyzed. Out of 300 patients, 148 were educated and 152 were uneducated. The study population was analyzed based on their age, sex, and literacy, i.e. the level of education. Seventy-six percent of uneducated and 48% of educated groups had false belief of ocular complications followed by the removal of upper teeth and among them uneducated females of older age group showed higher prevalence. The general public's knowledge about ocular complications due to tooth extraction in our study group is not adequate and needs improvement. Although the practice of informing by dentists is satisfactory, there is a need for creating awareness in the general public against such complications.
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