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, , Noël Palomo-Lovinski Noël Palomo-Lovinski Associate Professor at Kent State University. Noël's research focuses on the intersections of technology craft sustainability and the visual zeitgeist of contemporary culture and the implications of design pedagog, Kim Hahn Kim Hahn Associate Professor at Kent State University. Dr Hahn has been involved in research and creative scholarship that have focused on exploring the influences of cultural factors. khahnkent.edu
Published: 1 May 2014
Fashion Practice, Volume 6, pp 87-106; https://doi.org/10.2752/175693814x13916967094911

Abstract:
Sustainable practices in clothing have not, thus far, created a significant impact and instead continue to be largely marginalized within the fashion industry. The fashion industry continues to work in an inefficient manner that creates massive waste, exploits workers, and makes it increasingly difficult to make a substantial profit. There is wide disagreement among design environmentalists where energies must be focused to solve these problems. Many believe that consumers are primary instigators in change. Consumers do not understand any of the logistical or practical considerations of clothing design. Designers are, however, responsible for as much as 80 percent of any product that is introduced and have the ability to influence how fabric is sourced and how clothing is produced, cared for, and then discarded. This article explores professional fashion designers’ understanding and awareness of the current best practices in sustainable design. Thirty-five design professionals were surveyed about sustainability in fashion to assess what was missing in their education. The results are interpreted and analyzed as a basis for a new focus on curricula within the American college system and to create lasting and substantive change in the fashion industry.
J. Mukherjee, J. Parry, W. Dai, P. Roblin, S. Bibyk, J. Lee
Proceedings 2003 IEEE International Conference on Microelectronic Systems Education. MSE'03 pp 76-76; https://doi.org/10.1109/mse.2003.1205262

Abstract:
This paper describes the use of the newly developed Cadence toADS dynamic link in loadpull simulations for BiCMOS RFICdesign in a University environment. The process described herehelps a designer achieve an integrated design environment whereboth RF design and traditional VLSI design principles can beapplied in an integrated manner.
Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention, Volume 13, pp 107-135; https://doi.org/10.1080/17489539.2019.1597444

Abstract:
Research into intervention with people with speech and language needs often takes the form of single-case/case series experimental studies (SCEDs) or randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This paper explores the nature of these designs, including their strengths/weaknesses and highlights the value of understanding the intervention outcomes for individual participants. An online survey gathered information on speech and language therapists’ views on their use of the different research designs. We conclude that both research designs are used to inform practice. SCEDs, in particular, are used in developing theories of intervention and informing therapy with individuals. Sound experimental intervention studies of both designs are needed.
M. Best, A. Dearden, S. Dray, A. Light, J. C. Thomas, Celeste Buckhalter, Daniel Greenblatt, Shanks Krishnan, Nithya Sambasivan
Published: 1 January 2007
by 10.1007
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Harshada Patel, Oliver Stefani, , Hilko Hoffmann, Ioannis Karaseitanidis, Angelos Amditis
International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, Volume 64, pp 207-220; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhcs.2005.08.010

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Mark Denford, , Tim O. Neill
Proceedings. 11th IEEE International Conference and Workshop on the Engineering of Computer-Based Systems, 2004. pp 168-168; https://doi.org/10.1109/ecbs.2004.1316696

Abstract:
Architecture based refinement is an importanttechnique for ensuring efficiency, effectiveness andcorrectness in the practical design of complex computerbased systems. With a few exceptions, current methods ofarchitectural refinement focus on functional behaviourand fail to address non-functional requirementsthroughout the refinement process. A best practicesapproach to refinement would address both functionaland non-functional requirements such that the refinementof an abstract into a concrete (implementation)architecture ensures that both sets of requirements aremet.We propose a method that focuses on the non-functionalrequirements while still addressing thefunctional requirements throughout refinement. Themethod has a formal underpinning in abstract data types(based on term rewriting) which are used to represent thearchitectures throughout the refinement process and toplace pre and post conditions on the refinements. Inaddition to this, the method uses non-functionalrequirement calculators to check the non-functionalqualities of the architecture as refinement proceeds.Reflection on the practice of the method suggests that itmay be possible to extend the architectural style idea toprovide reusable refinement schema for the design ofcertain non-functional qualities into architecturalpatterns. The example considers reliability andperformance in the refinement of a client serverarchitectural pattern.The method does not aim to replace or fully automatethe work of the designer. It aims to augment the designprocess and aid the designer in performing their tasks. Itseeks to provide certain guidance for the designer thatwill help them make the right design decisions, andcorrect certain classes of errors.
T J King
Published: 1 January 1998
BT Technology Journal, Volume 16, pp 9-15; https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1009638520063

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
ASCE Task Committee on Thrust Restraint Design of Buried Pipelines
Abstract:
The practice of thrust restraint design within the water/wastewater pipeline industry has continuously evolved over the years, benefiting from both theoretical and experimental research. Many of these research activities have primarily originated within the pipe manufacturing industry, thus the research and the resulting practice changes have essentially been reflected in the design practice of the pipe material. Widely varying material properties and joint configurations have made it difficult to have coordinated practice changes, which have resulted in a lack of consensus on a common design approach amongst different pipe materials. This results in not only significantly different guidance from AWWA design manuals for different pipe materials and agency requirements, but also widely varying design practices and company specific best practice approaches amongst the consulting engineering community. Recognizing the need to develop consensus amongst practicing engineers, the members of the ASCE Technical Committee on Pipeline Installation and Location have formed a special task committee "Thrust Restraint Design of Buried Pipelines" to prepare a white paper on the subject. The objective of this task committee in preparing this white paper is: 1) To document current design practices of thrust restraint systems for various pipe materials; and compare current practices with theory. 2) To document the historical evolutions of the different design approaches, collect and compile field tests completed for different pipe materials. 3) To explore improvements to current practice, develop consensus, and propose recommendations for the development of a manual of practice. Preliminary findings of this white paper are presented in a series of three companion papers: Part 1, Current Practice; Part 2, Historical Development; and Part 3, Roadmap for Unified Approach. This is the third paper presenting the road map for unified approach. This paper presents a preliminary approach and recommendations to improve current design practice. It is the objective of this paper to determine if a more unified approach would benefit the pipeline manufacturing and design community and improve the integrity of pipeline design in general. The final recommendations from the white paper will form a basis for the development of a Manual of Practice on the subject.
ASCE Task Committee on Thrust Restraint Design of Buried Pipelines
Abstract:
The practice of thrust restraint design within the water/wastewater pipeline industry has continuously evolved over the years, benefiting from both theoretical and experimental research. Many of these research activities have primarily been originated by the pipe manufacturing industry, thus the research and the resulting practice changes have essentially been reflected in the design practice of these pipe materials. Widely varying material properties and joint configurations have made it difficult to have coordinated practice changes, which have resulted in a lack of consensus on a common design approach amongst different pipe materials. This results in not only significantly different guidance from AWWA design manuals for different pipe materials and agency requirements, but also widely varying design practices and company specific best practice approaches amongst the consulting engineering community. Recognizing the need to develop consensus amongst practicing engineers, the members of the ASCE Technical Committee on Pipeline Installation and Location have formed a special task committee "Thrust Restraint Design of Buried Pipelines" to prepare a white paper on the subject. The objective of this task committee in preparing this white paper is: 1) To document current design practices of thrust restraint systems for various pipe materials; and compare current practices with theory. 2) To document the historical evolutions of the different design approaches, collect and compile field tests completed for different pipe materials. 3) To explore improvements to current practice, develop consensus, and propose recommendations for the development of a manual of practice. Preliminary findings of this white paper are presented in a series of three companion papers: Part 1, Current Practice; Part 2, Historical Development; and Part 3, Roadmap for Unified Approach. This is the first paper presenting current practice. This paper documents the various methods currently used to calculate and mitigate thrust for common pipeline materials including concrete, ductile iron, fiberglass, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), and Steel. Also, this paper utilizes the current design approaches to quantitatively summarize the similarities and differences in the thrust calculations for each material and provide tabular and graphical comparisons of each design approach.
K. Verbert, , M. Derntl, M. Wolpers, , E. Duval
Published: 1 December 2012
Computers & Education, Volume 59, pp 1257-1272; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.06.005

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Mark L. Poteet
Published: 3 April 2009
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Philip Philip S. Dunston, Purdue University, James James Monty, Purdue University
Practices for Seamless Transmission of Design Data from Design Phase to Construction Equipment Operation: A Synthesis Study; https://doi.org/10.5703/1288284314324

Abstract:
The Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT), in response to requests from the construction contracting community, has chosen to examine how to facilitate their contractors’ use of three-dimensional machine control (3D-MC) systems, especially GPS-based systems. INDOT recognizes that the prerequisite 3D project model, if available in its intelligent electronic form, may be leveraged by both INDOT and its project partners to automate the performance of tasks other than construction. Therefore, INDOT was compelled to initiate this study to investigate the state of technology and the experiences of other state transportation agencies (STAs) and to synthesize that information to formulate recommendations for INDOT to implement for utilizing the electronic design file (EDF). The emphasis of the study is to discern best practices for how to facilitate better collaborative work and how to advance the use of 3D-MC on INDOT projects while avoiding or mitigating any pitfalls associated with supporting the use of the new technology. The work plan conducted by Investigators from the Purdue University School of Civil Engineering involved a literature review to uncover information on performance of 3D-MC technologies and computer technologies and associated processes to enhance project team collaborations. Concurrently, the Investigators surveyed vendors of 3D-MC systems and contractors and designers to uncover critical lessons from their experience with these systems. A review of STA Web sites was conducted to gain an overview of STA requirements regarding design files and product offerings of two leading providers of project design and civil project management software were reviewed to assess the efficacy of EDF sharing. These reviews were compared against the INDOT Project Development Process to reveal opportunities to leverage electronic forms of the design files. Contacts established from the surveys and Web site reviews, yielded further contacts with engineering service providers and STA personnel who were primarily interviewed by phone. The STA contacts also provided or referenced documents that were valuable to the information gathering activity. The phone interviews and shared documents provided the greatest clarity regarding the progress of other STAs toward implementation. The study confirmed that there are accessible commercial products from the industry leaders that enable 3D design model creation, secure file sharing with version control. Digital terrain models (DTMs) from these products can be read and translated for input to the array of GPS-based 3D-MC system options that are capable of meeting typical standard construction tolerances. The companies also have incorporated enough interoperability to work across platforms, thus enabling seamless and collaborative 3D-model-based project delivery with the appropriate investment. INDOT is making the correct investment in software applications to realize this objective. With regard particularly to implementing 3D-MC, information from select STAs provided insight into options and considerations for project selection and specifications that clarify liability. STAs have assumed various positions of responsibility for making the DTM available to contractors, ranging from an official hands-off stance to one that prescribes GPS-based 3D-MC for certain projects. The Investigators encourage INDOT to pursue implementation through a program of pilot projects with special committee oversight responsible for assessing benefits and compiling lessons learned. A manageable set of objectives should be carefully set for each pilot project so that benefits can be convincingly demonstrated. Indiana design consultants seek leadership from INDOT and input from construction contractors regarding the critical data and information needs so that they can deliver the desired electronic design files with greatest efficiency and effectiveness.
Published: 1 January 2021
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 22 December 2008
Simulation & Gaming, Volume 40, pp 328-376; https://doi.org/10.1177/1046878108326734

Abstract:
Simulation-based training (SBT) is a methodology for providing systematic and structured learning experiences. The effectinvess of this methodology is dependent on the quality of performance measurement practices in place. Performance measurement during SBT must be diagnosed; that is, the causes of effective and ineffective performance must be determined. This diagonstic measurement drives the systematic decisions concerning corrective feedback and remediation. The purpose of this article is to provide a state of the science review of human performance measurement systems in SBT. To this end, three specific goals are addressed. First, a review of the theoretical foundations being used to drive performance measurement systems in SBT is provided. Second, an overview of the methodologies and approaches to measurement in SBT is provided. Third, a set of best practices for designing performance measurement systems for use in SBT are provided. These best practices are based on the scientific and practice-based literatures.
Published: 1 December 2009
PROSPECTS, Volume 39, pp 321-334; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11125-010-9136-8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
P. Hodgetts, Hodgetts P.
Agile Development Conference (ADC'05) pp 235-242; https://doi.org/10.1109/adc.2005.24

Abstract:
Most significant software processes involve a wide range of disciplines, from programming to testing, and from documentation to database development. Unfortunately, agile processes are typically presented from the point of view of programmers, with the other disciplines often left feeling excluded and disenfranchised. One such discipline is that of user experience design (often abbreviated UED), a discipline encompassing several key specialties including user research, interface design, visual design and usability testing. UED activities span the full lifecycle of product development from early requirements analysis to construction and testing, spanning both large scale system issues and detailed components, with its work products forming key inputs and deliverables of many development activities. In this experience report, I discuss my coaching experiences integrating sophisticated UED practices into the agile process initiatives of several organizations. My background is initially that of a programmer and later that of an agile process coach, and I'll explore my journey understanding UED practices and how they map to popular agile processes, mainly Scrum [1] and Extreme Programming [2]. I'll chronicle the teams' struggles to come to grips with the often programming-centric orientation of agile processes, and their ongoing efforts to integrate their UED best practices into the incremental, collaborative world of agile processes.
Jonathan Arnowitz, Monica Heidelberg, Diana Gray, Michael Arent, Naomi Dorsch
CHI '05 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems pp 941-956; https://doi.org/10.1145/1056808.1056810

Abstract:
This paper discusses the redesign of PeopleSoft's Enterprise Expenses product from a product that was notorious for it's complexity into a product that was both usable and one of PeopleSoft's best selling products. The process used was a combination of best practices from user-centered design, business and marketing to deliver a usable application on a pure-html "no-code on the client" platform. The design effort was also a collaboration of design, usability engineers, business strategy, functional analysts and developers (and of course our customers!) At the same time, the process needed to track the competing interests of various stakeholders: clients, their end users, their business processes, our technical requirements, our limited resources and our internal stakeholders. The designed solution had to work within a framework that could not be re-written. A poorly working metaphor was redefined into a concept that would work better with the end-users.
Joseph Larry Jackson
Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, Volume 3, pp 294-297; https://doi.org/10.1108/17554211111162417

Abstract:
Purpose – This paper aims to review the question as to how academia and industry might work together to create research ideas that will result in methodologically sound research that also has pragmatic benefits for industry. Design/methodology/approach – The introduction of this article reviews industry panel reflections from the 2010 Hospitality Industry Diversity Institute (Hidi) conference. The main body of the article contains the author's perspective on what industry can gain from understanding and using the results of diversity research. Findings – The paper presents the findings of the 2010 Hidi conference and how research can be a valuable management tool. Practical implications – For researchers, the article gives industry research priorities for diversity research. For practitioners, it explains how research can be used to help manage organizations. Originality/value – The paper provides research priorities and gives an overview on the use of research by an industry leader. This approach is unique and will have value to the readers.
, Susan M Hubbard, Judy Y Huang
Published: 28 February 2003
Evaluation and Program Planning, Volume 26, pp 81-89; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0149-7189(02)00090-3

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Bob Little
Published: 1 September 2010
Abstract:
Learning technologists have stated innumerable times that delivery technology is irrelevant. What really matters is that the learning materials are designed and developed in line with accepted best practice in instructional design whichever formula that happens to be at the time. Yet, as soon as that statement is made, everyone becomes sidetracked by the latest piece of learning delivery technology. Do delivery technologies indeed matter, or is content really still king in e-learning?
Sergio Flores, Martin O. Gomez
Published: 1 March 2011
NASSP Bulletin, Volume 95, pp 65-79; https://doi.org/10.1177/0192636511406529

Abstract:
Some school leaders have viewed programs such as Advanced Placement (AP) as an attractive option to resolve the ongoing achievement gap problem. However, the ongoing debate in the field about maintaining the ostensible purity of the AP program versus diluting it with program expansion has hindered the full utilization of AP classes to close the achievement gap among student populations. School staff must stop buying into the notion that AP is only for the top students. The paradigm shift to opening up greater access to AP courses can only occur if school leaders support the active expansion of the AP program by creating the needed infrastructure to prepare students for AP rigor. In addition to presenting the authors’ reasons, the barriers they faced, the best practices that they have developed, and the schoolwide increased student achievement based on state measures, the authors present how AP expansion provides equitable and challenging educational opportunities for all students.
A.M. Ahmed, M. Zairi, S.A. Alwabel
Published: 1 January 2006
Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 13, pp 68-80; https://doi.org/10.1108/14635770610644583

Abstract:
Purpose – To examine issues related to the development of the internet and e-commerce (EC) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Design/methodology/approach – Two surveys were sent out following a pilot project to gather data on the validity and reliability of the questionnaires. The first survey was sent to 60 internet users, a total of 48 responded with a rate of 80 per cent. The second was sent to 60 managers and accountants within organisations in Saudi Arabia, a total of 44 responded with a rate of 73 per cent. Findings – The key challenges identified for Saudi's organisations are the continuing relying on face-to-face contact principles, problems with information overload, charges still expensive, the need for technical support and expertise, lack of a management commitment and understanding the potential role of information technology (IT) on the country's future and middle aged and older people were more reluctant to use IT. Research limitations/implications – Difficulties in reaching the right people to answer questions. This paper was relying on the subjective opinions and generlisability issues and it could benefited from further analysis. Practical implications – For executives, the implications of the findings are that those factors identified can be used as a checklist to assist companies in their effective adoption of e-business and the maximisation of opportunities. Originality/value – This paper is an initial phase of an on going research, which will contribute to the body of knowledge in the EC domain from different cultural perspectives.
, J. Kalina Hodges
Published: 23 December 2021
Frontiers in Nutrition, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2021.782703

Abstract:
Best practices for designing, conducting, documenting, and reporting human nutrition randomized controlled trials were developed and published in Advances in Nutrition. Through an example of the randomized clinical trial on blueberries and bone health funded by the National Institutes of Health, this paper will illustrate the elements of those best practices that apply specifically to plant-based intervention clinical trials. Unique study design considerations for human feeding interventions with bioactive plant compounds include the difficulty of blinding the intervention, background nutritional status of participants, carry-over effects of the intervention, benefits of a run-in period, lack of safety/tolerability data, and nutrition-specific regulatory policies. Human nutrition randomized controlled trials are the gold standard for establishing causal relations between an intervention and health outcome measures. Rigorous studies and documentation define the quality of the evidence-base to inform public health guidelines and to establish personalized dietary recommendations for the health-promoting plant components.
Derek H.T. Walker, Dale Christenson
Published: 1 June 2005
The Learning Organization, Volume 12, pp 275-291; https://doi.org/10.1108/09696470510592520

Abstract:
Purpose: This conceptual paper aims to explain how “project management centres of excellence (CoEs)”, a particular class of knowledge network, can be viewed as providing great potential for assisting project management (PM) teams to make wise decisions.Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents a range of knowledge network types and classifies them into a matrix using dimensions of social capital formation and learning levels. Examples were used of each identified type, drawn from the literature, to illustrate and clarify the capability maturity levels, from ad hoc isolated communities of interest to integrated and strategic CoEs that serve to propagate and transfer knowledge about an organisation's advanced project management skills and tools.Findings: The paper presens a useful framework for understanding this evolution and argues that CoEs can optimise, help coordinate and enhance the effectiveness of a range of knowledge networks operating within an inter‐organisational or intra‐organisational project team.Originality/value: The framework: facilitates PM organisational leaders to understand knowledge networks from a social capital formation and learning organisation perspective; highlights limitations of each of the identified knowledge network types from this perspective; and challenges PM leaders to strategically create and maintain a workplace environment that both encourages PM best practice and maximises organic learning development from which knowledge networks spring. PM leaders need to realise that sustaining CoEs is highly corporate resource intensive, however, derived benefits can include reduced wasted effort, poor project outcomes and increase organisational learning that facilitates continual PM process improvement. The framework provided here helps to justify that commitment.
Joyce Van Tassel‐Baska, ,
Published: 1 December 2006
Roeper Review, Volume 29, pp 84-92; https://doi.org/10.1080/02783190709554391

Abstract:
To help teachers develop a repertoire of instructional strategies that will effect positive changes on students’ learning outcomes is essential for both general education and the field of gifted education. This article introduces readers to a classroom observation tool that is designed to help assess professional development needs of teachers of gifted learners in practicing differentiation best practices. The authors give an extensive review of the literature, discuss the blueprint for constructing the scale, and provide a detailed description of the scale development process, the technical adequacy data of the instrument, as well as how the instrument can be used in multiple settings. The authors also draw implications for using this tool to connect the instructional efficacy of teachers to student learning outcomes.
, Larry Stapleton, Gabriel J. Byrne
Published: 3 August 2007
AI & SOCIETY, Volume 22, pp 385-403; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-007-0149-7

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Markku Kuula, Antero Putkiranta, Jarmo Toivanen
International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Volume 32, pp 106-120; https://doi.org/10.1108/01443571211208597

Nancy R. Lee, Margaret Miller
Published: 10 February 2012
Journal of Social Marketing, Volume 2, pp 70-86; https://doi.org/10.1108/20426761211203265

Abstract:
Purpose – Influencing positive financial behaviors is the natural next frontier for social marketers to “get serious about”, as there are clear behaviors that, once adopted by target populations, will improve the quality of life for individuals as well as society. The purpose of this paper is to describe a study conducted on behalf of the Consultive Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP), an independent policy and research center dedicated to advancing financial access for the world's poor. Design/methodology/approach – The seven best practices presented in this paper are based on original research undertaken in 2009-2010 which examined more than 100 cases around the world where a social marketing approach was used to influence a financial behavior. Findings – Relevant behaviors identified, including those related to establishing a bank account, increasing savings, using credit wisely, avoiding over indebtedness, applying for micro finance loans, adopting new technologies, reducing chances of fraud, choosing the right insurance, reporting abuse, and shopping around and comparing offers. Potential target audiences were broad, ranging from sex workers in India, to farmers in “self-help” groups in Kenya, to girls aged 10-18 in Mongolia, to the homeless in San Francisco, to households on tea estates in India. Originality/value – The paper describes seven best practices essential for success when applying social marketing principles and techniques to influence desired financial behaviors. For each practice, case examples are then presented, ones that demonstrate the successful application of the highlighted best practice to influence a specific financial behavior. In total, ten cases have been chosen to provide a range of countries, behaviors, target audiences, and strategies.
Fernando Doglio
Published: 20 July 2018
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Fernando Doglio
Published: 1 January 2015
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Susan Hovorka
SECARB Stakeholders Briefing Atlanta, GA March 2014; https://doi.org/10.2172/1749848

Abstract:
Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB): Monitoring Best Practices
Published: 1 January 2021
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 January 2020
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, David Calfee, Scott K. Fridkin, Susan S. Huang, John A. Jernigan, Ebbing Lautenbach, Shannon Oriola, Keith M. Ramsey, Cassandra D. Salgado, Robert A. Weinstein, The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee
Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, Volume 29, pp 901-913; https://doi.org/10.1086/591741

Abstract:
Monitoring multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) and the infections they cause in a healthcare setting is important to detect newly emerging antimicrobial resistance profiles, to identify vulnerable patient populations, and to assess the need for and effectiveness of interventions; however, it is unclear which metrics are the best, because most of the metrics are not standardized. This document describes useful and practical metrics and surveillance considerations for measuring MDROs and the infections they cause in the practice of infection prevention and control in healthcare settings. These metrics are designed to aid healthcare workers in documenting trends over time within their facility and should not be used for interfacility comparison.
C J Tyrrell
Published: 1 January 2000
BT Technology Journal, Volume 18, pp 30-35; https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1026755829062

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Crispin Hales, Shayne Gooch
Published: 1 January 2004
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Miriam B. Larson,
Educational technology research and development, Volume 57, pp 1-24; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-006-9031-4

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