Refine Search

New Search

Results: 140,500

(searched for: ("Covid-19") OR ("SARS-CoV-2") OR ("coronavirus") OR ("2019-nCoV"))
Save to Scifeed
Page of 14,051
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Sciprofile linkOlivia Levrini, Paola Fantini, Sciprofile linkEleonora Barelli, Laura Branchetti, Sara Satanassi, Sciprofile linkGiulia Tasquier
Science & Education pp 1-31; doi:10.1007/s11191-020-00159-x

Abstract:
The crisis due to the COVID-19 pandemic led most people all over the world to deal with a change in their perception and organization of time. This happened also, and mainly, within the educational institutions, where students and teachers had to rearrange their teaching/learning dynamics because of the forced education at a distance. In this paper, we present an exploratory qualitative study with secondary school students aimed to investigate how they were experiencing their learning during lockdown and how, in particular, learning of science contributed to rearranging their daily lifetime rituals. In order to design and carry out our investigation, we borrowed constructs coming from a research field rather unusual for science education: the field of sociology of time. The main result concerns the discovery of the potential of the dichotomy between alienation from time and time re-appropriation. The former is a construct elaborated by the sociologist Hartmut Rosa to describe the society of acceleration in the “era of future shock”. The latter represents an elaboration of the construct of appropriation that the authors had operationally defined, starting from Bakhtin’s original idea, to describe the nexus between physics learning and identity. Thanks to the elaboration of the notion of time re-appropriation as feature of the “era of present shock”, the study unveils how school science, instead of preparing the young to navigate our fast-changing and complex society, tends to create “bubbles of rituals” that detach learning from societal concern.
Robert L. Sautter, James Snyder
Journal of Clinical and Medical Case Reports, Volume 2020, pp 1-2; doi:10.31487/j.jcmcr.2020.03.04

Abstract:
The institution of laboratory testing is a difficult task that requires a multidisciplinary team and in particular “buy-in” by the laboratory as a whole [1, 2]. Often, the type of testing either in the main laboratory or in the point of care will be discussed over a significant amount of time [1-3]. In particular, when complex testing such as molecular testing is being brought on board, several things must be considered [4].
Anuradha Kishor Ingale, Sciprofile linkPooja Shrivastav
International Journal of Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Volume 11, pp 923-927; doi:10.26452/ijrps.v11ispl1.3163

Abstract:
The goal of Ayurveda is prevention is better than cure. There are a total of 9152 COVID-19 cases reported in India (till April 13, 2020), 308 people were died because of this disease, and 856 patients were treated successfully in our Country. This virus can easily affect or harm those individuals who have an infection, less immunity and especially who all have been aged more than sixty. Most of the countries are worried only for their people's life (health). In contrast, the developing countries like India that has a large population have to consider about the livelihood for people like Below Poverty Line (BPL) or those living in slum areas, equally with their life. The main aim of the article is to aware the people not only Urban but also among Rural and needy individuals to adopt the Ayurveda lifestyle during Covid19 outbreak. For this to study various methods which are described in Ayurveda for boosting immunity among various individuals. This study is a review type of article. All information and references have been collected and compiled from various available Ayurvedic classics texts. Research articles are also searched from various websites related to Covid19 outbreak and its effect on needy individuals. All matters have been analysed for some discussion, and an attempt has been made to rule out some conclusions. During this lockdown, people are mostly living a sedentary lifestyle which not only weakens their immune system but also make them more susceptible to infections. Hence Ayurveda is a science of life that is mainly focusing on strengthening persons by boosting their immune system through improving our lifestyle by using medicines, diets, meditation and activities like Yoga. This article will give insights about poor people and effective strategy to threat COVID-19 through Ayurveda in India.
Sciprofile linkMehmet Güray Güler, Ebru Geçici
Published: 25 September 2020
Computers & Industrial Engineering; doi:10.1016/j.cie.2020.106874

Abstract:
The rapidly spreading COVID-19 pandemic has affected many people worldwide. Due to the high infectivity, countries make calls to stay at home or take measures such as lockdowns to ensure that people are least affected by the virus. Meanwhile, infected people are getting treatments: people who are slightly affected are quarantined at home, and those who are heavily affected are treated in hospitals. Hence there is an excessive increase in the hospital workload. This causes physical fatigue in healthcare professionals. Along with the increasing workload, the fear of being infected and infecting the environment causes psychological problems in healthcare professionals. It is important to protect healthcare professionals and provide them with suitable working conditions. For this reason, besides the provision of protective equipment such as gloves, overalls, mask, and glasses that are necessary for the protection of healthcare workers from the virus, healthcare services should also be planned very carefully. One of the critical issues is planning the shift schedules of the physicians. In this study, we handle the preparation of a physician shift schedule of a hospital in Turkey during the COVID-19 pandemic. The hospital has established three new COVID-19 related departments and the aim is to provide continuous service in the new departments while maintaining the workload in the existing departments. We propose a mixed integer programming (MIP) model to address the shift scheduling problem and transform it into a decision support system (DSS). The resulting schedules minimize the exposure of the physicians to the virus with a balanced workload while maintaining the healthcare service in all departments.
Sciprofile linkMohammad Sorowar Hossain, Enayetur Raheem, Mahbubul H. Siddiqee
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, Volume 15, pp 1-2; doi:10.1186/s13023-020-01543-0

Abstract:
South Asia is the hotspot of beta-thalassemia, with an estimated 200,000 patients whose lives depend on regular blood transfusion. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, many countries have adopted unprecedented lockdown to minimize the spread of transmission. Restriction of nationwide human mobility and fear of COVID-19 infection has put thalassemia patients in a life-threatening situation because of an acute shortage of blood supply. As a public health preparedness strategy during a crisis like COVID-19 pandemic, the plights of thalassemia patients should be considered. Government-sponsored community blood-banks needs to be established or coverage expanded as a safety net for the thalassemia patients in lower- and middle-income countries.
Richard Mpango, Jasmine Kalha, Donat Shamba, Mary Ramesh, Fileuka Ngakongwa, Arti Kulkarni, Palak Korde, Juliet Nakku, Sciprofile linkGrace K. Ryan
Globalization and Health, Volume 16, pp 1-4; doi:10.1186/s12992-020-00622-y

Abstract:
Background A recent editorial urged those working in global mental health to “change the conversation” on coronavirus disease (Covid-19) by putting more focus on the needs of people with severe mental health conditions. UPSIDES (Using Peer Support In Developing Empowering mental health Services) is a six-country consortium carrying out implementation research on peer support for people with severe mental health conditions in high- (Germany, Israel), lower middle- (India) and low-income (Tanzania, Uganda) settings. This commentary briefly outlines some of the key challenges faced by UPSIDES sites in low- and middle-income countries as a result of Covid-19, sharing early lessons that may also apply to other services seeking to address the needs of people with severe mental health conditions in similar contexts. Challenges and lessons learned The key take-away from experiences in India, Tanzania and Uganda is that inequalities in terms of access to mobile technologies, as well as to secure employment and benefits, put peer support workers in particularly vulnerable situations precisely when they and their peers are also at their most isolated. Establishing more resilient peer support services requires attention to the already precarious situation of people with severe mental health conditions in low-resource settings, even before a crisis like Covid-19 occurs. While it is essential to maintain contact with peer support workers and peers to whatever extent is possible remotely, alternatives to face-to-face delivery of psychosocial interventions are not always straightforward to implement and can make it more difficult to observe individuals’ reactions, talk about emotional issues and offer appropriate support. Conclusions In environments where mental health care was already heavily medicalized and mostly limited to medications issued by psychiatric institutions, Covid-19 threatens burgeoning efforts to pursue a more holistic and person-centered model of care for people with severe mental health conditions. As countries emerge from lockdown, those working in global mental health will need to redouble their efforts not only to make up for lost time and help individuals cope with the added stressors of Covid-19 in their communities, but also to regain lost ground in mental health care reform and in broader conversations about mental health in low-resource settings.
Sciprofile linkPratik Khanal, Navin Devkota, Minakshi Dahal, Kiran Paudel, Devavrat Joshi
Globalization and Health, Volume 16, pp 1-12; doi:10.1186/s12992-020-00621-z

Abstract:
Background Health care workers exposed to COVID-19 might be at increased risk of developing mental health problems. The study aimed to identify factors associated with anxiety, depression and insomnia among health workers involved in COVID-19 response in Nepal. Methods This was a cross-sectional web-based survey conducted between April 26 and May 12, 2020. A total of 475 health workers participated in the study. Anxiety and depression were measured using a 14-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS: 0–21) and insomnia was measured by using a 7-item Insomnia Severity Index (ISI: 0–28). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was done to determine the risk factors of mental health outcomes. Results Overall, 41.9% of health workers had symptoms of anxiety, 37.5% had depression symptoms and 33.9% had symptoms of insomnia. Stigma faced by health workers was significantly associated with higher odds of experiencing symptoms of anxiety (AOR: 2.47; 95% CI: 1.62–3.76), depression (AOR: 2.05; 95% CI: 1.34–3.11) and insomnia (AOR: 2.37; 95% CI: 1.46–3.84). History of medication for mental health problems was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing symptoms of anxiety (AOR: 3.40; 95% CI:1.31–8.81), depression (AOR: 3.83; 95% CI: 1.45–10.14) and insomnia (AOR: 3.82; 95% CI: 1.52–9.62) while inadequate precautionary measures in the workplace was significantly associated with higher odds of exhibiting symptoms of anxiety (AOR: 1.89; 95% CI: 1.12–3.19) and depression (AOR: 1.97; 95% CI: 1.16–3.37). Nurses (AOR: 2.33; 95% CI: 1.21–4.47) were significantly more likely to experience anxiety symptoms than other health workers. Conclusion The study findings revealed a considerate proportion of anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms among health workers during the early phase of the pandemic in Nepal. Health workers facing stigma, those with history of medication for mental health problems, and those reporting inadequate precautionary measures in their workplace were more at risk of developing mental health outcomes. A focus on improving mental wellbeing of health workers should be immediately initiated with attention to reduction of stigma, ensuring an adequate support system such as personal protective equipments, and family support for those with history of mental health problems.
Published: 25 September 2020
Emerald Expert Briefings; doi:10.1108/oxan-es256492

Abstract:
Headline INT: COVID-19 exposes structural inequalities
Published: 25 September 2020
Emerald Expert Briefings; doi:10.1108/oxan-db256488

Abstract:
Significance Public health structures were developed and expanded over four decades of war and isolation, allowing them to mobilise effectively against COVID-19 despite the negative impacts of US sanctions. However, economic constraints have prevented full lockdowns that might control case numbers, leaving exhausted medical workers without respite. Impacts There is no sign of an immediate threat to political stability, especially while Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei remains in good health. Foreign media narratives on poor health sector performance will have a short-term psychological impact but are likely to lose credibility. If Iran ever joins the WTO, its pharmaceutical sector will suffer significantly from the loss of protective tariffs.
Published: 25 September 2020
Emerald Expert Briefings; doi:10.1108/oxan-db256486

Abstract:
Significance Long-standing weaknesses in governance and the public health system have left Libya unable to slow or prevent community transmission of COVID-19. Impacts Military decisions and commitments will remain unaffected by COVID-19 concerns. Public discontent will remain focused on broader issues affecting daily life. A major disruption to Libya's deteriorating water system, the Great Man-Made River, could affect hygiene as the pandemic gains pace.
Page of 14,051
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top