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(searched for: ("Covid-19") OR ("SARS-CoV-2") OR ("coronavirus") OR ("2019-nCoV"))
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Sciprofile linkXianglei Liu, Aleksandra Drelich, Wei Li, Chuan Chen, Zehua Sun, Megan Shi, Cynthia Adams, John W. Mellors, Chien-Te Tseng, Sciprofile linkDimiter S. Dimitrov
Published: 27 October 2020
Vaccine, Volume 38, pp 7205-7212; doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.09.058

Abstract:
The development of an effective vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 is urgently needed. We generated SARS-CoV-2 RBD-Fc fusion protein and evaluated its potency to elicit neutralizing antibody response in mice. RBD-Fc elicited a higher neutralizing antibodies titer than RBD as evaluated by a pseudovirus neutralization assay and a live virus based microneutralization assay. Furthermore, RBD-Fc immunized sera better inhibited cell–cell fusion, as evaluated by a quantitative cell–cell fusion assay. The cell–cell fusion assay results correlated well with the virus neutralization potency and could be used for high-throughput screening of large panels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and vaccines without the requirement of live virus infection in BSL3 containment. Moreover, the anti-RBD sera did not enhance the pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2 infection of K562 cells. These results demonstrate that Fc fusion can significantly improve the humoral immune response to recombinant RBD immunogen, and suggest that RBD-Fc could serve as a useful component of effective vaccines against SARS-CoV-2.
Sciprofile linkJayanthi Wolf, Ryan Hansen, Kimberly Hassis, William Lapps, Emese Warmuth
Published: 27 October 2020
Vaccine, Volume 38, pp 7198-7200; doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.09.057

Yueying Wang, Gary Tse, Guangping Li, Gregory Y.H. Lip, Sciprofile linkTong Liu
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.07.068

Sciprofile linkJeffrey I. Mechanick, Robert S. Rosenson, Sean P. Pinney, Donna M. Mancini, Jagat Narula, Valentin Fuster
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 2024-2035; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.07.069

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Ashley Shew
Published: 27 October 2020
Human Affairs, Volume 30, pp 608-616; doi:10.1515/humaff-2020-0054

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Gennaro Giustino, Sciprofile linkSean P. Pinney, Anuradha Lala, Vivek Y. Reddy, Hillary A. Johnston-Cox, Jeffrey I. Mechanick, Jonathan L. Halperin, Valentin Fuster
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 2011-2023; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.08.059

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Sciprofile linkJiwon Kim, Alexander Volodarskiy, Razia Sultana, Meridith P. Pollie, Brian Yum, Lakshmi Nambiar, Romina Tafreshi, Hannah W. Mitlak, Arindam Roychoudhury, Evelyn M. Horn, et al.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1965-1977; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.08.066

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Sciprofile linkSean P. Pinney, Gennaro Giustino, Jonathan L. Halperin, Jeffrey I. Mechanick, Eric Neibart, Jeffrey W. Olin, Robert S. Rosenson, Valentin Fuster
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 76, pp 1999-2010; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.08.058

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Published: 26 October 2020
by MDPI
Pharmacy, Volume 8; doi:10.3390/pharmacy8040199

Abstract:
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is ongoing. The unprecedented challenges worldwide implore the urgent development of a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. Globally, pharmacists have been delivering important public health services as part of the COVID-19 response. It remains to be seen what role they will play once a vaccine is available. This review examines herd immunity and the potential role of the pharmacy profession in mass vaccination against COVID-19, particularly within the Australian context. Aim: A literature review was conducted to review the global development of COVID-19 vaccines, and the Australian healthcare workforce capability and existing policy for mass vaccination and the potential role of the pharmacist. Method: ScienceDirect, Scopus, The National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Wiley Online Library, PubMed, and Google Scholar were used to search for relevant literature using keywords COVID-19, vaccines, immunisation, herd immunity, pandemic, pharmacist and Australian healthcare. Results: A large portion of the literature was journal articles, and information from governmental and international bodies such as the World Health Organisation were often referenced. Over 20 million Australians need to be immunised through vaccination or acquire immunity through natural infection for the country to achieve herd immunity for COVID-19. When examining state and territory pandemic plans, pharmacists are underutilised. Modifying legislation to allow pharmacists to administer approved COVID-19 vaccines will enable a trained and skilled workforce to be deployed to increase the rate of mass vaccination. Conclusion: In preparation for a successful COVID-19 vaccine, the Australian Government must consider various elements in their vaccination policy. This includes the estimated herd immunity threshold, methods of vaccine delivery, vaccine clinic locations, staffing arrangements and training, and strategies for vaccine prioritisation. Pharmacists can and should play a key role in the roll out of mass COVID-19 vaccination.
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