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Results: 38

(searched for: Ecocycles)
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Sandy Smith-Nonini
Published: 1 January 2016
Anthropology in Action, Volume 23; doi:10.3167/aia.2016.230103

Sandor Nemethy, Tamas Komives
Published: 1 January 2016
Ecocycles, Volume 2, pp 44-46; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v2i1.55

Tamas Komives, Sandor Nemethy
Published: 1 January 2015
Ecocycles, Volume 1, pp 1-2; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v1i1.18

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kirsten Davies, Elisabeth Blik
Published: 7 October 2014
World Sustainability Series pp 103-118; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-08837-2_8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Prasun K. Roy, Minna Hakkarainen, Indra K. Varma, Ann-Christine Albertsson
Environmental Science & Technology, Volume 45, pp 4217-4227; doi:10.1021/es104042f

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Balan Pillai
5th IEEE International Conference on Digital Ecosystems and Technologies (IEEE DEST 2011) pp 349-357; doi:10.1109/dest.2011.5936588

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Guoqiang Zhang, Jinyue Yan, Hongguang Jin, Erik Dahlquist
International Journal of Green Energy, Volume 8, pp 275-293; doi:10.1080/15435075.2010.550077

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Diana Lee-Smith
Published: 25 October 2010
Environment and Urbanization, Volume 22, pp 483-499; doi:10.1177/0956247810377383

Abstract: For several decades, a diverse literature has claimed that urban agriculture has the potential for hunger and poverty alleviation. This article reviews empirical data from equatorial Africa that touch on this assertion, updating the work on the subject published in the mid-1990s. Research, largely from East Africa but also including Cameroon in West Central Africa, appearing in several recent and currently emerging publications is assessed and compared. The article attempts to quantify the extent of urban agriculture in several cities based on the proportion of urban households involved, and assesses its statistical and qualitative relationship to urban food and nutrition security as well as its complex relationship to poverty. The role of urban agriculture in closing
eco-cycles
is discussed in important new data from three cities on how organic solid waste is, or is not, being re-used. Recent efforts in policy-making in three East African cities are reviewed, prior to making a policy analysis. The article concludes that the scale and extent of urban agriculture is increasing with, or perhaps in excess of, urban growth according to available data, and that it is beneficial to human health as well as to hunger and poverty alleviation. Urban livestock production and land availability are particularly beneficial. Poverty alleviation through urban agriculture could be both better understood and supported by appropriate policy measures, since better-off households are currently benefiting more from urban agriculture than the majority of poor households. Nutrient cycling through urban agriculture is enhanced by small mixed crop—livestock farms, which are the “backbone of urban farming systems”. Recent policy measures emerging in the region suggest positive future direction.
Frederick Bird, Frances Westley, Marc Langlois
Voices From the Voluntary Sector; doi:10.3138/9781442699915-009

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