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(searched for: doi:10.1126/*)
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Mark A. Skylar-Scott, Sebastien G. M. Uzel, Lucy L. Nam, John H. Ahrens, Ryan L. Truby, Sarita Damaraju, Jennifer A. Lewis
Science Advances, Volume 5; doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaw2459

Abstract: Engineering organ-specific tissues for therapeutic applications is a grand challenge, requiring the fabrication and maintenance of densely cellular constructs composed of ~108 cells/ml. Organ building blocks (OBBs) composed of patient-specific–induced pluripotent stem cell–derived organoids offer a pathway to achieving tissues with the requisite cellular density, microarchitecture, and function. However, to date, scant attention has been devoted to their assembly into 3D tissue constructs. Here, we report a biomanufacturing method for assembling hundreds of thousands of these OBBs into living matrices with high cellular density into which perfusable vascular channels are introduced via embedded three-dimensional bioprinting. The OBB matrices exhibit the desired self-healing, viscoplastic behavior required for sacrificial writing into functional tissue (SWIFT). As an exemplar, we created a perfusable cardiac tissue that fuses and beats synchronously over a 7-day period. Our SWIFT biomanufacturing method enables the rapid assembly of perfusable patient- and organ-specific tissues at therapeutic scales.
Judy Lieberman, Hao Wu, Jonathan C. Kagan
Science Immunology, Volume 4; doi:10.1126/sciimmunol.aav1447

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Rachael A. Clark
Science Immunology, Volume 4; doi:10.1126/sciimmunol.aaz2438

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Xuejian Wu, Zachary Pagel, Bola S. Malek, Timothy H. Nguyen, Fei Zi, Daniel S. Scheirer, Holger Müller
Science Advances, Volume 5; doi:10.1126/sciadv.aax0800

Abstract: Mobile gravimetry is important in metrology, navigation, geodesy, and geophysics. Atomic gravimeters could be among the most accurate mobile gravimeters but are currently constrained by being complex and fragile. Here, we demonstrate a mobile atomic gravimeter, measuring tidal gravity variations in the laboratory and surveying gravity in the field. The tidal gravity measurements achieve a sensitivity of 37 μGal/Hz (1 μGal = 10 nm/s2) and a long-term stability of better than 2 μGal, revealing ocean tidal loading effects and recording several distant earthquakes. We survey gravity in the Berkeley Hills with an uncertainty of around 0.04 mGal and determine the density of the subsurface rocks from the vertical gravity gradient. With simplicity and sensitivity, our instrument paves the way for bringing atomic gravimeters to field applications.
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