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(searched for: doi:10.1001/*)
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Christianne L. Roumie, Jonathan Chipman, Jea Young Min, Amber J. Hackstadt, Adriana M. Hung, Robert A. Greevy, Carlos G. Grijalva, Tom Elasy, Marie R. Griffin
Published: 19 September 2019
JAMA pp 1-11; doi:10.1001/jama.2019.13206

Abstract: In 2012, there were approximately 30 million US adults diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes, of whom 20% also had impaired kidney function.1 Metformin is the initial recommended diabetes treatment based on the beneficial results reported in 1998 from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) 34.2,3 The UKPDS demonstrated that metformin reduced the incidence of macrovascular complications compared with sulfonylureas or insulin independent of glycemic control.2,4 Several large observational studies support the UKPDS findings.4-7
Deborah J. Wexler
Published: 19 September 2019
JAMA; doi:10.1001/jama.2019.14533

Julio Rosenstock, Steven E. Kahn, Odd Erik Johansen, Bernard Zinman, Mark A. Espeland, Hans J. Woerle, Egon Pfarr, Annett Keller, Michaela Mattheus, David Baanstra, et al.
Published: 19 September 2019
JAMA; doi:10.1001/jama.2019.13772

Abstract: When choosing medications to manage type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular safety, glucose-lowering potency, hypoglycemia risk, effect on body weight, and cost are important considerations.1-3 Most guidelines state that metformin should be first-line therapy followed by various options for second-line treatment if sufficient glycemic control is not achieved after metformin monotherapy.1-3 Sulfonylureas and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are the most commonly used second-line glucose-lowering treatments in many countries.4 Sulfonylureas are used mainly based on their low cost, well-established glucose-lowering action, and a long-standing experience in clinical practice. However, sulfonylureas are associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia1,3,5-7 and modest weight gain.1,5 In addition, there is an ongoing controversy regarding their long-term cardiovascular safety, based on early data from the University Group Diabetes Program in the 1960s8 and multiple observational and smaller studies indicating conflicting results.9,10
Mallory McKeon, Jocelyn Kohn, Daphne Munhall, Sarah Wells, Susan Blanchette, Rachel Santiago, Robert Graham, Roger Nuss, Reza Rahbar, Mark Volk, et al.
JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery; doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2019.2500

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Jeremy D. Prager, Christopher D. Baker
JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery; doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2019.2499

F. Christopher Holsinger, J. Scott Magnuson, Gregory S. Weinstein, Jason Y. K. Chan, Heather M. Starmer, Raymond K. Y. Tsang, Eddy W. Y. Wong, Christopher H. Rassekh, Nikita Bedi, Steven S. Y. Hong, et al.
JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery; doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2019.2654

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Donald R. Sullivan, Benjamin Chan, Jodi A. Lapidus, Linda Ganzini, Lissi Hansen, Patricia A. Carney, Erik K. Fromme, Miguel Marino, Sara E. Golden, Kelly C. Vranas, et al.
Published: 19 September 2019
JAMA Oncology; doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.3105

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Ryan Nipp, Areej El-Jawahri, Jennifer Temel
Published: 19 September 2019
JAMA Oncology; doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.3100

Abhijit V. Kshirsagar, Melina R. Kibbe, David A. Gerber
Published: 19 September 2019
JAMA Surgery; doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2019.4286

S. Andrew Josephson
Published: 19 September 2019
JAMA Neurology; doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2019.3056

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