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(searched for: <p>The Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Pathophysiology of Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders</p>)
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Mental Health Clinician, Volume 6, pp 285-288; doi:10.9740/mhc.2016.11.285

Abstract: Schizophrenia is a severe
disorder
affecting approximately 1%
of
the
population. Historically, alterations
of
dopaminergic function were considered
the
primary cause
of
schizophrenia. However, for many patients, drugs that alter dopaminergic function do not consistently lead to resolution
of
the
symptoms
of
schizophrenia. Thus, there is an increased interest
in
pathophysiologic
processes that result
in
altered neurodevelopment and plasticity associated with schizophrenia.
Brain-derived
neurotrophic
factor
(BDNF) is a neurotrophin involved
in
neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, cognition, and neurotransmission. Genetic polymorphism, expression, and function
of
BDNF have been implicated
in
psychiatric
diseases, including schizophrenia. This review discusses BDNF, its
role
in
neurologic
processes, and
the
evidence implicating BDNF
in
schizophrenia.
Roland Ricken, Mazda Adli, Claudia Lange, Esther Krusche, Thomas J. Stamm, Sebastian Gaus, Stephan Koehler, Sarah Nase, Tom Bschor, Christoph Richter, et al.
Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, Volume 33, pp 806-809; doi:10.1097/jcp.0b013e3182a412b8

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